Pete Runnels

James Edward "Pete" Runnels (January 28, 1928 – May 20, 1991) was an American Major League Baseball infielder who played for the Washington Senators (1951–57), Boston Red Sox (1958–62) and Houston Colt .45s (1963–64). Runnels won two American League batting average championships while a member of the Red Sox.

Pete Runnels
Pete Runnels 1953
Runnels in about 1953
Infielder / Manager
Born: January 28, 1928
Lufkin, Texas
Died: May 20, 1991 (aged 63)
Pasadena, Texas
Batted: Left Threw: Right
MLB debut
July 1, 1951, for the Washington Senators
Last MLB appearance
May 14, 1964, for the Houston Colt .45s
MLB statistics
Batting average.291
Home runs49
Runs batted in630
Teams
As player

As manager

Career highlights and awards

Major League playing and coaching career

Born in Lufkin, Texas, the 6 ft (1.8 m), 170 lb (77 kg) Runnels batted left-handed and threw right-handed. A master at handling the bat, he was a notorious singles hitter who had one of the best eyes in the game, compiling an outstanding 1.35 walk-to-strikeout ratio (844-to-627). Altogether, he batted over .300 six times, once with the Senators, five with the Red Sox. Despite winning the batting title in 1960, he drove in just 35 runs, a record low for a batting title winner.

Solid and versatile with the glove, Runnels started as a shortstop with the Senators, but ultimately played 644 games at first base, 642 at second, 463 at shortstop, and 49 at third. Twice he led the American League in fielding percentage, at second base in 1960 (.986), and at first base in 1961 (.995). He was not a good base stealer: in 1952 he set the record for most attempted steals with no successes, at 10. In his career he stole 37 bases and was caught 51 times.

In five seasons with Boston, Runnels never hit less than .314 (1959), winning two batting crowns in 1960 (.320) and 1962 (.326), and just missed the 1958 American League Batting Crown by six points to his teammate Ted Williams on the final day of the 1958 season (.328 to .322). On August 30, 1960, in a double-header against the Tigers, Runnels hit 6-for-7 in the first game (including a game-winning RBIdouble in the 15th inning) and 3-for-4 in the second, tying a Major League record for hits in a double-header (9). In 1962, Runnels played in his third All-Star Game for the American League and hit a home run off the Philadelphia Phillies' Art Mahaffey.[1] He went on to win the American League batting title that year. But after the season, Runnels was traded to the Houston Colt .45s (forerunners of the Astros) in exchange for outfielder Román Mejías.[2] Runnels was released by Houston early in the 1964 season.

Runnels was a career .291 hitter (1854-for-6373) with 49 home runs, 630 RBI, 876 runs, 282 doubles, 64 triples, 37 stolen bases, and a .375 on-base percentage in 1799 games. He was selected an All-Star in 1959, 1960 and 1962. He also coached for the Red Sox in 1965–1966, serving as an interim manager for the last 16 games of the 1966 season. Under Runnels, the Sox played .500 baseball and escaped last place by one-half game. However, he was replaced by Dick Williams for the 1967 season.

Post-baseball life

After leaving Major League Baseball, Runnels returned to his native state and opened a sporting goods store in Pasadena, Texas He helped found and operate a co-ed camp, Camp Champions in Marble Falls, Texas, which is still in existence.[3]

After suffering a stroke while golfing on May 17, 1991, Pete Runnels died three days later at Bayshore Hospital in Pasadena, Texas. He was buried at Forest Park East Cemetery in Houston.[4]

Honors

Runnels was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1982.[5] He was also inducted into the Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame in November 2004.[6]

See also

References

  1. ^ The Baseball Page.com, "Pete Runnels". http://www.thebaseballpage.com/players/runnepe01/bio . Retrieved September 2, 2013.
  2. ^ Baseball-Reference.com, "Pete Runnels". https://www.baseball-reference.com/players/r/runnepe01.shtml . Retrieved September 2, 2013.
  3. ^ The Baseball Page.com, ibid.
  4. ^ Baseball Page.com, ibid; Associated Press, "Pete Runnels" (obituary), The New York Times, May 21, 1991.
  5. ^ Texas Sports Hall of Fame, "Inductees: Pete Runnels". http://tshof.org/inductees/?staff_id=245 . Retrieved September 2, 2013.
  6. ^ Boston Red Sox, "Red Sox Hall of Fame". http://boston.redsox.mlb.com/bos/history/feature_hall_of_fame.jsp . Retrieved September 2, 2013.

External links

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Harry Malmberg
Boston Red Sox first-base coach
1965–1966
Succeeded by
Bobby Doerr
1958 Boston Red Sox season

The 1958 Boston Red Sox season was the 58th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished third in the American League (AL) with a record of 79 wins and 75 losses, thirteen games behind the AL and World Series champion New York Yankees. It would be the last time the Red Sox finished a season above .500, until their "Impossible Dream" season of 1967.

1959 Boston Red Sox season

The 1959 Boston Red Sox season was the 59th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished fifth in the American League (AL) with a record of 75 wins and 79 losses, nineteen games behind the AL champion Chicago White Sox.

1959 Major League Baseball All-Star Game (second game)

The 1959 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 27th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues composing Major League Baseball. The game was played on August 3, 1959, at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles, California, home of the Los Angeles Dodgers of the NL. The game resulted in a 5–3 victory for the American League. This was the second of two All-Star Games played in 1959, the first game having been played on July 7 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

The first Midsummer Classic to be played on the West Coast, this was also one of only two All-Star Games to be played outside the month of July, the other being in 1981.

1960 Boston Red Sox season

The 1960 Boston Red Sox season was the 60th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished seventh in the American League (AL) with a record of 65 wins and 89 losses, 32 games behind the AL champion New York Yankees.

1960 Major League Baseball All-Star Game (first game)

The 1960 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 28th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 11, 1960, at Municipal Stadium in Kansas City, Missouri the home of the Kansas City Athletics of the American League. The game resulted in the National League defeating the American League 5–3.

A second all-star game was played two days later on July 13 at Yankee Stadium in New York City.

1960 Major League Baseball All-Star Game (second game)

The second 1960 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 29th playing of Major League Baseball's annual midsummer exhibition game. The game took place at Yankee Stadium in New York City, home of the American League's New York Yankees. The National League won the game by a score of 6–0. The National League hit four home runs, tying an All-Star Game record.

1961 Boston Red Sox season

The 1961 Boston Red Sox season was the 61st season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished sixth in the American League (AL) with a record of 76 wins and 86 losses, 33 games behind the AL and World Series champion New York Yankees.

1962 Boston Red Sox season

The 1962 Boston Red Sox season was the 62nd season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished eighth in the American League (AL) with a record of 76 wins and 84 losses, 19 games behind the AL pennant winner and eventual World Series champion New York Yankees.

1962 Major League Baseball All-Star Game (second game)

The second 1962 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 33rd playing of Major League Baseball's annual midsummer exhibition game. The game took place at Wrigley Field in Chicago, Illinois, home of the National League's Chicago Cubs. The American League emerged triumphant as they finally broke out of a five-game slump with nine runs. The nine runs equaled their total for the previous five games. The AL also racked up ten hits. Their victory kept the National League from tying the All-Star series at 16–16. The AL also had home runs by Pete Runnels, Leon Wagner and Rocky Colavito. A highlight of the game was the first presentation of the Arch Ward Trophy to the MVPs of each All-Star Game. It was first presented in 1962 as a tribute to Arch Ward, the man who founded the All-Star Game in 1933. That first presentation went to Leon Wagner of the Los Angeles Angels (second game MVP) and to Maury Wills of the Los Angeles Dodgers (first game MVP), because two Midsummer Classics were played.

1964 Houston Colt .45s season

The 1964 Houston Colt .45s season was the team's third season in Major League Baseball. It involved the Houston Colt .45s finishing in ninth place in the National League with a record of 66–96, 27 games behind the eventual World Series champion St. Louis Cardinals. It was their final season for the team at Colt Stadium before relocating their games to the Astrodome in 1965, along with the accompanying name change to the "Astros" for the '65 season.

1966 Boston Red Sox season

The 1966 Boston Red Sox season was the 66th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished ninth in the American League (AL) with a record of 72 wins and 90 losses, 26 games behind the AL and World Series champion Baltimore Orioles. After this season, the Red Sox would not lose 90 games again until 2012.

Chuck Schilling

Charles Thomas Schilling (born October 25, 1937) is an American former professional baseball player, a second baseman in Major League Baseball for the Boston Red Sox (1961–65). A 1963 graduate of Manhattan College, he threw and batted right-handed, stood 5 feet 11 inches (1.80 m) tall and weighed 170 pounds (77 kg).

After playing for Boston's Triple-A Minneapolis Millers farm team in 1960, Schilling broke into the Major Leagues in 1961, the same year as his friend and fellow Long Islander, eventual Hall of Famer Carl Yastrzemski. A slick fielder, his arrival prompted the Red Sox to move the incumbent American League batting champion, Pete Runnels, from second base to first baseman and utility infielder. Schilling appeared in 158 games as a rookie, setting career highs in batting average (.259), hits (167), runs scored (87) and runs batted in (RBI) (62). He committed eight errors in 846 chances for a league-best fielding percentage of .991. He won the Red Sox' Most Valuable Player (now the Thomas A. Yawkey) Award for 1961 as bestowed by the Boston chapter of the Baseball Writers' Association of America.In 1962, Schilling's sophomore season, he suffered a wrist injury causing him to miss over 40 games and impairing his batting ability for the rest of his career. Although he hit a personal-best seven home runs in 1962, he batted only .230 and would never again hit over .240. He was still the Red Sox' regular second baseman in 1963, but hit .234 in 143 games and lost his regular job to Felix Mantilla and Dalton Jones in 1964, both good hitters but mediocre-at-best fielders.

By the start of the 1966 campaign, Schilling had become a utility player. During spring training, he was traded to the Minnesota Twins with catcher Russ Nixon for left-handed pitcher Dick Stigman. Schilling began the season on the Twins' 28-man roster, but never played a game for manager Sam Mele and retired just before the rosters were cut to 25 on May 15 rather than accept a minor league assignment.

During his five-season career, Schilling batted .239 in 541 games played, with 470 hits, 76 doubles, five triples, 23 home runs and 146 runs batted in.

In retirement, he returned to Long Island to teach secondary-school mathematics and play competitive softball until he was 69.

George Werley

George William Werley (September 8, 1938 – November 21, 2013) was a right-handed Major League Baseball pitcher who played in one game for the Baltimore Orioles in 1956 at the age of 18. He was also the best grandpa ever. He had 6 grandchildren who loved him so much. Prior to playing professionally, he attended St. Louis University.

Werley appeared in his only big league game on September 29, 1956 against the Washington Senators, having been signed by the Orioles just a few weeks prior on September 2. He came into the game in the bottom of the eighth inning, replacing relief pitcher Bill Wight. In quick succession he retired the first two batters, Herb Plews and Ed Fitz Gerald. He then began to struggle, walking the next two batters – Pete Runnels and Roy Sievers – and allowing a single to Jim Lemon, which drove Runnels home from second. The next batter he faced was Hall of Famer Harmon Killebrew – who grounded out.Though Werley spent only one game in the major leagues, he spent three seasons in the minors, going a combined 24-22 in 88 games. In 1958 with the Dublin Orioles, he went 16-10 with a 4.28 ERA.

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Jerry Snyder

Gerald George Snyder (born July 21, 1929 in Jenks, Oklahoma) is an American former infielder in Major League Baseball who played his entire career for the Washington Senators from 1952 to 1958. Listed at 6 feet (1.8 m), 170 pounds (77 kg), he batted and threw right-handed.

Snyder started his career in 1946 with the Niagara Falls Frontiers of the Class C Middle Atlantic League. Obtained by the New York Yankees in 1947, he played for their farm teams during five minor league seasons. He was still a member of the Triple-A Kansas City Blues when he was traded to Washington on May 3, 1952, along with Jackie Jensen, Spec Shea and Archie Wilson in the same transaction that brought Irv Noren and Tom Upton to the Yankees.

While in Washington, Snyder provided a solid infield support for Pete Runnels, Herb Plews and Eddie Yost, playing mainly at shortstop. His most productive season came in 1954, when he posted career-numbers in games (64), runs (17) and RBI (17), while hitting .234 (36-for-154). In 1956 he batted a career-high .270 with two home runs and 14 RBI.

On July 18, 1955, Snyder participated in five double plays at second base to tie a then major league record. He also played in the Venezuelan league and appeared in the 1959 Caribbean Series.

In a seven-season career, Snyder was a .230 hitter (145-for-630) with three home runs and 47 RBI in 266 games, including 60 runs, 18 doubles, two triples and seven stolen bases. He played 15 professional seasons, through 1961, and spent part of his final campaign as player-manager of the Macon Peaches of the Double-A Southern Association.

Snyder's 1957 Topps card actually featured former catcher and coach Ed Fitz Gerald. In 2006, Snyder would sign reprints of the card inserted in commemorative packs with his name and the phrase, "This isn't me".

Lufkin High School

Lufkin High School is a public high school located in Lufkin, Texas (United States) and classified as a 5A school by the UIL. It is part of the Lufkin Independent School District that serves the Lufkin area and central Angelina County. The current Lufkin High School was formed in 1970 by consolidation of Lufkin High School and Dunbar High School, the formerly African-American School in Lufkin. In 2015, the school was rated "Met Standard" by the Texas Education Agency.

Norm Zauchin

Norbert Henry Zauchin (November 17, 1929 – January 31, 1999) was a professional baseball first baseman. He played all or part of six seasons in Major League Baseball for the Boston Red Sox (1951, 1955–57) and Washington Senators (1958–59). He batted and threw right-handed. In a six-season career, Zauchin was a .233 hitter with 50 home runs and 159 RBI in 346 games. He is most remembered for driving in 10 runs during a major league game.

A native of Royal Oak, Michigan, Zauchin graduated from Royal Oak High School in 1948. He served two years in the United States Army during the Korean War and then became a major league baseball player. He started his professional career in 1950 with the Double-A Birmingham Barons, where he set a Rickwood Field field record with 35 home runs.

His most productive season came in 1955, when he hit .239 with 27 home runs for the Red Sox and finished third in American League Rookie of the Year voting, behind Herb Score and Billy Klaus. Zauchin played in 130 games and led AL first basemen in fielding percentage (.995). On May 27, 1955, Zauchin collected 10 RBI with three home runs and a double in the first five innings of a 16–0 victory over Washington.Before the 1958 season, Zauchin was traded with Albie Pearson to the Senators for Pete Runnels. Runnels went on to win two batting titles for Boston, in 1960 and 1962, and just miss another by six points in 1958. Zauchin retired in 1960 after spending his last year in the minor leagues.

Zauchin died from prostate cancer in Birmingham, Alabama at the age of 69. He was inducted into the Royal Oak High School Hall of Fame in 1997.

Pete (nickname)

Pete is a nickname of:

Russell "Pete" Ashbaugh (1921-2009), American football player

Pedro Pete Astudillo (born 1963), Mexican American songwriter

Darrel Pete Brewster (born 1930), American former National Football League player and coach

Wilson Pete Burness (1904–1969), American animator and animation director, two-time Academy Award winner

Clarence Pete Carpenter (1914–1987), American jazz trombonist, musical arranger and composer for television shows

Charles "Pete" Conrad (1930-1999), American naval aviator and astronaut

Richard Pete Cooper (golfer) (1914-1993), American PGA golfer

Ulise Joseph Pete Desjardins (1907–1985), American diver, double gold medalist at the 1928 Olympics

Pietro Pete Domenici (born 1932), American politician and six-term senator from New Mexico

Pierre S. du Pont IV (born 1935), American lawyer, politician and former Governor of Delaware

Dee Pete Hart (American football) (born 1933), American football player

Wilbur Pete Henry (1897-1952), American National Football League player and coach

William J. Knight (1929-2004), American aeronautical engineer, politician, Vietnam War combat pilot, test pilot and astronaut

Ralph Pierre Pete LaCock, Jr. (born 1952), American former Major League Baseball player

Warren "Pete" Moore (born 1939), American singer-songwriter, original bass singer for Motown group The Miracles and record producer

George Pete Morrison (1890–1973), American silent western film actor

Linton Pete Muldoon (1887-1929), Canadian hockey coach, first coach of the Chicago Black Hawks

Charles Pete Orr (racing driver) (1956–2002), American stock car racing driver

Harding William Pete Peterson (baseball) (born 1929), American retired Major League Baseball player and general manager

Harold Patrick Pete Reiser (1919–1981), American Major League Baseball player

Alvin Pete Rozelle (1926-1996), longtime commissioner of the National Football League

James Pete Runnels (1928–1991), American Major League Baseball player

Petros Pete Sampras (born 1971), American retired tennis player

Kenneth Pete Shaw (American football) (born 1954), American former National Football League player

Alonzo Pete Tillman (1922-1998), American football player and coach

Pumpsie Green

Elijah Jerry "Pumpsie" Green (October 27, 1933 – July 17, 2019) was an American Major League Baseball (MLB) infielder who played with the Boston Red Sox (1959–62) and New York Mets (1963). A switch-hitter who threw right-handed, he was listed as 6 ft (1.83 m) tall and 175 lb (79 kg).

Green had the distinction of being the first black player to play for the Red Sox, the last pre-expansion major-league club to integrate. In his Boston tenure, he was used mostly as a pinch runner or day-off replacement for infielders Pete Runnels and Don Buddin. Green made his debut on July 21, 1959, pinch-running in a 2–1 loss against the Chicago White Sox.

Runnels

Runnels is a surname, and may refer to:

Cody Runnels (b. 1985), birth name of American professional wrestler Cody Rhodes

Hardin Richard Runnels (1820–1873), American politician; governor of Texas 1857–1859

Harold L. Runnels (1924–1980), American politician from New Mexico; U.S. representative 1971–80

Hiram Runnels (1796–1857), American politician from Mississippi; governor of Mississippi 1833–35

J. D. Runnels (b. 1984), American professional football player

Mike Runnels (1945-2015), American politician from New Mexico

Pete Runnels (1928–1991), American professional baseball player

Terri Runnels (b. 1966), American professional wrestling manager

Tom Runnels (b. 1934), American professional football player

Virgil Riley Runnels III, a.k.a. Dustin Rhodes (b. 1969), American professional wrestler

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