Pete Elliott

Peter R. Elliott (September 29, 1926 – January 4, 2013) was an American football player and coach. Elliott served as the head football coach at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln (1956), the University of California, Berkeley (1957–1959), the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (1960–1966), and the University of Miami (1973–1974), compiling a career college football record of 56–72–11.

Pete Elliott
Bump and Pete Elliott
Brothers Bump and Pete Elliott, 1960
Biographical details
BornSeptember 29, 1926
Bloomington, Illinois
DiedJanuary 4, 2013 (aged 86)
Canton, Ohio
Playing career
Football
1945–1948Michigan
Position(s)Quarterback (football)
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1949–1950Oregon State (ends)
1951–1955Oklahoma (assistant)
1956Nebraska
1957–1959California
1960–1966Illinois
1973–1974Miami (FL)
1978St. Louis Cardinals (assistant)
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1974–1978Miami (FL)
1979–1995Pro Football Hall of Fame (exec. dir.)
Head coaching record
Overall56–72–1
Bowls1–1
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
1 AAWU (1958)
1 Big Ten (1963)
College Football Hall of Fame
Inducted in 1994 (profile)

College

Elliott was an All-American quarterback on the undefeated 1948 Michigan Wolverines football team that won a national championship. He was also a standout basketball player who was first-team All-Big Ten Conference in 1948 and second-team All-Big Ten in 1949 as well as team MVP in 1948.[1] The 1948 team finished third in the eastern region of the NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championship.[1] Elliott is the only Michigan athlete to have earned 12 letters in varsity sports: football, basketball, and golf.

Elliott Brothers, Fritz Crisler and Bruce Hilkene
Bump Elliott, Pete (No. 45), Fritz Crisler and Bruce Hilkene (No. 75) celebrate 1947 Big 9 championship after defeating Wisconsin.

At Michigan, Elliott played football with his brother Bump, who also became a well known college coach.

Coaching career

After college, Elliot served as an assistant coach at Oregon State (1949–50) and Oklahoma (1951–55). In 1956, he took the head coaching job at Nebraska, lasting one year with a record of 4–6. The next year, he took over at California, where he remained until 1959 with a compiled record of 10–21. In 1958, he led the Golden Bears to an AAWU title and an appearance in the Rose Bowl, where they lost to Iowa.

In 1960, Elliott succeeded Ray Eliot at Illinois and was at the school until 1966. With the Illini, his record was 31–34–1, earning a Big Ten title and Rose Bowl victory over Washington during the 1963 season. A few months after the end of the 1966 season, he was forced to resign in the wake of a slush fund scandal in the athletic program. In 1973, he became head coach at Miami, where he remained for two years and compiled an 11–11 record.

Later life

Elliott served as athletic director at Miami from 1973 to 1978. In March 1978, Elliott rejoined his former boss, Bud Wilkinson, as an assistant with the NFL St. Louis Cardinals. Elliott served as Executive Director of the Pro Football Hall of Fame from 1979 to 1996 and was serving on its Board of Trustees. Elliott was also a member of the Sigma Chi Fraternity and was selected as a Significant Sig.

Elliott died at the age of 86 of congestive heart failure on January 4, 2013, in Canton, Ohio.[2]

Head coaching record

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs Coaches# AP°
Nebraska Cornhuskers (Big Seven Conference) (1956)
1956 Nebraska 4–6 3–3 4th
Nebraska: 4–6 3–3
California Golden Bears (Pacific Coast Conference) (1957–1958)
1957 California 1–9 1–6 7th
1958 California 7–4 6–1 1st L Rose 16 16
California Golden Bears (Athletic Association of Western Universities) (1959)
1959 California 2–8 1–3 4th
California: 10–21 8–10
Illinois Fighting Illini (Big Ten Conference) (1961–1966)
1960 Illinois 5–4 3–4 T–5th
1961 Illinois 0–9 0–7 10th
1962 Illinois 2–7 2–5 8th 18
1963 Illinois 8–1–1 5–1–1 1st W Rose 4 3
1964 Illinois 6–3 4–3 T–4th 16
1965 Illinois 6–4 4–3 5th
1966 Illinois 4–6 4–3 T–3rd
Illinois: 31–34–1 22–26–1
Miami Hurricanes (NCAA Division I independent) (1973–1974)
1973 Miami 5–6
1974 Miami 6–5
Miami: 11–11
Total: 56–72–1
      National championship         Conference title         Conference division title or championship game berth

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Michigan Basketball 2007-08 (media guide).
  2. ^ Goldstein, Richard (January 6, 2013). "Pete Elliott, Football All-American and Coach, Dies at 86". The New York Times. Retrieved May 2, 2017.

External links

1946–47 Michigan Wolverines men's basketball team

The 1946–47 Michigan Wolverines men's basketball team represented the University of Michigan in intercollegiate basketball during the 1946–47 season. The team finished the season in 5th place in the Big Ten Conference with an overall record of 12–8 and 6–6 against conference opponents.Osborne Cowles was in his first year as the team's head coach. Mack Supronowicz was the team's leading scorer with 228 points in 20 games for an average of 11.4 points per game. Pete Elliott was the team captain.

1947–48 Michigan Wolverines men's basketball team

The 1947–48 Michigan Wolverines men's basketball team represented the University of Michigan in intercollegiate college basketball during the 1947–48 season. The team played its home games at Yost Arena on the school's campus in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The team won the Western Conference Championship. Under the direction of head coach Osborne Cowles, the team earned Michigan's first invitation to the NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament in 1948. The team was led the school's first two All-Big Nine honorees: Bob Harrison and Pete Elliott as well as the team's leading scorer Mack Suprunowicz. The team earned the Big Nine team statistical championships for both scoring defense (46.3) and scoring margin (7.6). Harrison served as team captain and Elliott earned team MVP.

1948 All-Big Nine Conference football team

The 1948 All-Big Nine Conference football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Big Nine Conference teams selected by the Associated Press (AP), United Press (UP) and the International News Service (INS) for the 1948 Big Nine Conference football season. Players selected as first-team honorees by the AP, UP and INS are displayed in bold.

Michigan compiled a 9–0 record, won both the Big Nine Conference and national football championships, and had four players who were selected as consensus first-team All-Big Nine players. Michigan's consensus first-team honorees were quarterback Pete Elliott, end Dick Rifenburg, tackle Alvin Wistert, guard Dominic Tomasi.

Other players receiving first-team honors from at least two of the three major selectors were Indiana halfback George Taliaferro, Purdue halfback Harry Szulborski, Northwestern fullback Art Murakowski, Minnesota end Bud Grant, Minnesota guard Leo Nomellini, and Northwestern center Alex Sarkisian.

1948 Michigan Wolverines football team

The 1948 Michigan Wolverines football team represented the University of Michigan during the 1948 Big Nine Conference football season. In its first year under head coach Bennie Oosterbaan, Michigan compiled a 9–0 record, defeated six ranked opponents by a combined score of 122–17, and won both the Big Nine Conference and national football championships. In the final AP Poll, Michigan received 192 first place votes, twice as many as second-place Notre Dame which garnered 97 first place votes.

The 1948 season was Michigan's second straight undefeated, untied season. After Fritz Crisler led the 1947 team to a perfect 10–0 record, the Wolverines entered the 1948 season with a 14-game winning streak dating back to October 1946. Despite the loss of all four backfield starters from the 1947 team (including Big Nine MVP Bump Elliott and Heisman Trophy runner-up Bob Chappuis), the 1948 team extended the winning streak to 23 games.

On offense, Michigan was led by a new backfield that included All-American quarterback Pete Elliott and halfbacks Chuck Ortmann and Leo Koceski. The team scored 252 points, an average of 28 points per game. With Ortmann as the principal passer, the Wolverines relied on an air attack, gaining more yards in the air (1,355) than on the ground (1,262). Dick Rifenburg, the team's leading receiver, was picked as a first-team All-American at the end position. Team captain Dominic Tomasi was selected as the team's Most Valuable Player. The 1949 Michiganensian wrote of the 250-pound guard, "Famous for his sharp shattering blocking, Dom tore huge gaps in the opposing lines to pave the way for Michigan's steam roller offense."On defense, the Wolverines allowed only 44 points, an average of 4.8 points per game. The defense was led by tackles Alvin Wistert and Al Wahl, center Dan Dworsky, and fullback Dick Kempthorn. Michigan gave up 935 passing yards and 851 rushing yards. The team shut out Oregon despite the passing game of College and Pro Football Hall of Fame quarterback Norm Van Brocklin. It also held ranked Purdue and Northwestern teams to 36 and 47 rushing yards, respectively. The defense forced a total of 32 turnovers (including 21 interceptions), an average of three-and-a-half turnovers per game.

1956 Nebraska Cornhuskers football team

The 1956 Nebraska Cornhuskers football team was the representative of the University of Nebraska and member of the Big 7 Conference in the 1956 NCAA University Division football season. The team was coached by Pete Elliott and played their home games at Memorial Stadium in Lincoln, Nebraska.

1957 California Golden Bears football team

The 1957 California Golden Bears football team was an American football team that represented the University of California, Berkeley in the Pacific Coast Conference (PCC) during the 1957 college football season. In their first year under head coach Pete Elliott, the Golden Bears compiled a 1–9 record (1–6 against PCC opponents), finished in a tie for seventh place in the PCC, and were outscored by their opponents by a combined total of 176 to 109.The team's statistical leaders included Joe Kapp with 580 passing yards and Jack Hart with 396 rushing yards and 276 receiving yards. Kapp was later inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame.

1958 California Golden Bears football team

The 1958 California Golden Bears football team was an American football team that represented the University of California, Berkeley in the Pacific Coast Conference (PCC) during the 1958 NCAA University Division football season. In their second year under head coach Pete Elliott, the Golden Bears compiled a 7–4 record (6–1 against PCC opponents), won the PCC championship, lost to Iowa in the 1959 Rose Bowl, and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 207 to 200.The team's statistical leaders included Joe Kapp with 649 passing yards and 582 rushing yards and Jack Hart with 334 receiving yards. Kapp and Hart were also the team's co-captains. Kapp was later inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame.

1959 California Golden Bears football team

The 1959 California Golden Bears football team was an American football team that represented the University of California, Berkeley in the Athletic Association of Western Universities (AAWU) during the 1959 college football season. In their third and final year under head coach Pete Elliott, the Golden Bears compiled a 2–8 record (1–6 against AAWU opponents), finished in fourth place in the AAWU, and were outscored by their opponents by a combined total of 223 to 115.The team's statistical leaders included Wayne Crow with 379 passing yards, Walt Arnold with 351 rushing yards, and Gael Barsotti with 111 receiving yards. Two Cal players were selected by the Associated Press (AP) for the 1959 All-Pacific Coast football team: Frank Sally as a first-team tackle and Walt Arnold as a second-team fullback. Wayne Crow later played four years in the American Football League.

1960 Illinois Fighting Illini football team

The 1960 Illinois Fighting Illini football team was an American football team that represented the University of Illinois during the 1960 Big Ten Conference football season. In their first year under head coach Pete Elliott, the Illini compiled a 5–4 record and finished in a three-way tie for fifth place in the Big Ten Conference. Tackle Joe Rutgens was selected as the team's most valuable player.

1961 Illinois Fighting Illini football team

The 1961 Illinois Fighting Illini football team was an American football team that represented the University of Illinois during the 1961 Big Ten Conference football season. In their second year under head coach Pete Elliott, the Illini compiled a 0–9 record and finished in last place in the Big Ten Conference. Guard Tony Parrilli was selected as the team's most valuable player.

1962 Illinois Fighting Illini football team

The 1962 Illinois Fighting Illini football team was an American football team that represented the University of Illinois during the 1962 Big Ten Conference football season. In their third year under head coach Pete Elliott, the Illini compiled a 2–7 record and finished in eighth place in the Big Ten Conference. Halfback Ken Zimmerman was selected as the team's most valuable player.

1963 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1963 Big Ten Conference football season was the 68th season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference and was a part of the 1963 NCAA University Division football season.

The 1963 Illinois Fighting Illini football team, under head coach Pete Elliott, won the Big Ten football championship with a record of 8–1–1, defeated Washington in the 1964 Rose Bowl, and was ranked No. 3 in the final AP Poll. Illinois center Dick Butkus received the Chicago Tribune Silver Football award as the most valuable player in the conference and was a consensus first-team All-American.

The 1963 Michigan State Spartans football team, under head coach Duffy Daugherty, compiled a 6–2–1 record, finished in second place in the conference, led the conference in scoring defense (7.0 points allowed per game), and was ranked No. 10 in the final AP Poll. Halfback Sherman Lewis was a consensus first-team All-American and finished third in the voting of the 1963 Heisman Trophy.

The Big Ten's statistical leaders included Tom Myers of Northwestern with 1,398 passing yards, Tom Nowatzke of Indiana with 756 rushing yards, and Paul Krause of Iowa with 442 receiving yards. Carl Eller of Minnesota was the first Big Ten player selected in the 1964 NFL Draft with the sixth overall pick.

1963 Illinois Fighting Illini football team

The 1963 Illinois Fighting Illini football team was an American football team that represented the University of Illinois during the 1963 Big Ten Conference football season. In their fourth year under head coach Pete Elliott, the Illini compiled an 8–1–1 record, finished in first place in the Big Ten Conference, were ranked #3 in the final AP Poll, and defeated Washington in the 1964 Rose Bowl. The sole loss was a 14-8 defeat against Michigan.Illinois center/linebacker Dick Butkus was selected as the team's most valuable player, won the 1963 Chicago Tribune Silver Football trophy as the Big Ten's most valuable player, and was honored as a unanimous first-team player on the 1963 College Football All-America Team. Tackle Archie Sutton was selected by the Newspaper Enterprise Association as a second-team All-American.Quarterback Mike Taliaferro led the team with 450 passing yards while Jim Grabowski led the team with 616 rushing yards. Gregg Schumacher led the team with 133 receiving yards.

1965 Illinois Fighting Illini football team

The 1965 Illinois Fighting Illini football team represented the University of Illinois in the 1965 Big Ten Conference football season. In their sixth season under head coach Pete Elliott, the Illini compiled a 6–4 (4–3 against Big Ten Conference opponents), outscored opponents 235 to 118, and finished fifth in the Big Ten. Fullback Jim Grabowski was selected as the team's most valuable player, received the team's most valuable player award, and was a consensus pick for the 1965 College Football All-America Team.

1966 Illinois Fighting Illini football team

The 1966 Illinois Fighting Illini football team was an American football team that represented the University of Illinois during the 1966 Big Ten Conference football season. In their seventh year under head coach Pete Elliott, the Illini compiled a 4–6 record and finished in a tie for third place in the Big Ten Conference.The team's offensive leaders were quarterback Bob Naponic with 998 passing yards, running back Bill Huston with 420 rushing yards, and John Wright with 831 receiving yards. Guard Ron Guenther was selected as the team's most valuable player.

1973 Miami Hurricanes football team

The 1973 Miami Hurricanes football team represented the University of Miami for the 1973 NCAA Division I football season. The Hurricanes played their home games at the Miami Orange Bowl in Miami. The team was coached by Pete Elliott, in his first year as head coach of the Hurricanes.

1974 Miami Hurricanes football team

The 1974 Miami Hurricanes football team represented the University of Miami for the 1974 NCAA Division I football season. The Hurricanes played their home games at the Miami Orange Bowl in Miami. The team was coached by Pete Elliott, in his second and final year as head coach of the Hurricanes.

History of Michigan Wolverines football in the Oosterbaan years

The History of Michigan Wolverines football in the Oosterbaan years covers the history of the University of Michigan Wolverines football program during the period from the promotion of Bennie Oosterbaan as head coach in 1948 through his firing after the 1958 season. Michigan was a member of the Big Ten Conference during the Oosterbaan years and played its home games at Michigan Stadium.

During the 11 years in which Oosterbaan served as head football coach, Michigan compiled a record of 63–33–4 (.650). In Oosterbaan's first year as head coach, the 1948 team compiled a perfect 9–0 and won a national championship. The team won Big Ten Conference championships in each of Oosterbaan's first three years as head coach. In 1950, Michigan defeated Ohio State 9 to 3 in the legendary Snow Bowl game and went on to defeat California by a 14 to 6 score in the 1951 Rose Bowl.

After compiling a 2–6–1 record (1–5–1 Big Ten) record in 1958, and finishing in eighth place in the Big Ten, Oosterbaan was fired and replaced by Bump Elliott. Three players from the Oosterbaan years have been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame. They are Pete Elliott, Alvin Wistert, and Ron Kramer.

List of Illinois Fighting Illini head football coaches

The following is a list of Illinois Fighting Illini men's football head coaches. The Illinois Fighting Illini football team has had 27 individuals that have maintained the title of head coach. The current coach is Lovie Smith.

*Hall, Lindgren, Lowenthal and Matthews shared the title of "Head Coach" for the 1904 season.

**Zook was fired at the end of the regular season; defensive coordinator Vic Koenning was appointed as interim head coach and coached Illinois in the Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl.

***Cubit served as interim coach for the most of the 2015 regular season after Tim Beckman was terminated in August 2015, one week before the season-opening game. The "Interim" portion of Cubit's title was removed on November 28, 2015, a few hours before the last game of the season, and he was named permanent head coach--a tenure that lasted exactly one game, as the following March he was relieved of duties in favor of Lovie Smith by new Athletic Director Josh Whitman.

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