Pete Donohue

Peter Joseph Donohue (November 5, 1900 in Athens, Texas – February 23, 1988 in Fort Worth, Texas) was a right-handed starting pitcher with a 12-year career from 1921 to 1932. He played for the Cincinnati Reds, New York Giants, both of the National League, and the Cleveland Indians and Boston Red Sox of the American League. His interment was located at Fort Worth's Greenwood Memorial Park along with Tom Baker and Jackie Tavener.

Pete Donohue
Pete Donohue
Pitcher
Born: November 5, 1900
Athens, Texas
Died: February 23, 1988 (aged 87)
Fort Worth, Texas
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
July 1, 1921, for the Cincinnati Reds
Last MLB appearance
May 6, 1932, for the Boston Red Sox
MLB statistics
Win–loss record134–118
Earned run average3.87
Strikeouts574
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Highlights

  • Led National League in wins (1926, with 20 wins)

See also

External links

1922 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1922 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished second in the National League with a record of 86–68, 7 games behind the New York Giants.

1923 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1923 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished second in the National League with a record of 91–63, 4½ games behind the New York Giants.

1924 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1924 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fourth in the National League with a record of 83–70, 10 games behind the New York Giants.

1925 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1925 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished third in the National League with a record of 80–73, 15 games behind the Pittsburgh Pirates.

1926 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1926 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished second in the National League with 87 wins and 67 losses, 2 games behind the St. Louis Cardinals.

1926 Major League Baseball season

The 1926 Major League Baseball season.

1927 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1927 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fifth in the National League with a record of 75–78, 18½ games behind the Pittsburgh Pirates.

1928 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1928 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fifth in the National League with a record of 78–74, 16 games behind the St. Louis Cardinals.

1929 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1929 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished seventh in the National League with a record of 66–88, 33 games behind the Chicago Cubs.

1930 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1930 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished seventh in the National League with a record of 59–95, 33 games behind the St. Louis Cardinals.

1930 New York Giants (MLB) season

The 1930 New York Giants season was the 48th in franchise history. The team finished third in the National League with a record of 87–67, 5 games behind the St. Louis Cardinals.

1931 Cleveland Indians season

The 1931 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fourth in the American League with a record 78–76, 30 games behind the Philadelphia Athletics.

1931 New York Giants (MLB) season

The 1931 New York Giants season was the franchise's 49th season. The team finished in second place in the National League with an 87-65 record, 13 games behind the St. Louis Cardinals.

1932 Boston Red Sox season

The 1932 Boston Red Sox season was the 32nd season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished last in the eight-team American League (AL) with a record of 43 wins and 111 losses. The team set franchise records for fewest wins, most losses, and lowest winning percentage (.279) in a season—these records still stand through the end of the 2018 season.

Cincinnati Reds award winners and league leaders

This article is a list of baseball players who are Cincinnati Reds players that are winners of Major League Baseball awards and recognitions, Reds awards and recognitions, and/or are league leaders in various statistical areas.

Donohue

Donohue is an originally an Irish surname which is abbreviated from O Donohue. (Irish: Ó Donnachú). Notable people with the surname include:

Adam Donohue (born 1990), Australian rules footballer

Charles D. Donohue (1880–1928), New York politician and judge

David Donohue (born 1967), American race car driver

Erin Donohue (born 1983), American Track & Field athlete

Harold Donohue (1901–1984), American politician

Jack Donohue (disambiguation), several people

Jerry Donohue (1920–1985), American theoretical and physical chemist

Jim Donohue (born 1938), American baseball player

James K. Donohue (born 1954), Founder Muck Boot Company

Keith Donohue (disambiguation), several people

Kether Donohue (born 1985), actress

Larry Donohue (born 1955), former Australian rules footballer

Mark Donohue (1937–1975), American racecar driver

Mary Donohue (born 1947), New York lieutenant governor and judge

Niall Donohue (1990–2013), Irish hurler

Nigel Donohue (born 1969), British judoka

Pat Donohue (born 1953), American fingerstyle guitarist

Pete Donohue (1900–1988), American baseball player

Peter M. Donohue (21st century), American Roman Catholic priest

Tom Donohue (born 1952), retired professional baseball player

Tom J. Donohue (born 1938), President and CEO of the United States Chamber of Commerce

William Anthony Donohue (born 1947), American president of the Catholic League for Religious and Civil Rights in the United States

William J. Donohue (c. 1873–1907), New York politician

List of Cincinnati Reds Opening Day starting pitchers

The Cincinnati Reds are a Major League Baseball franchise based in Cincinnati who play in the National League's Central Division. In their history, the franchise also played under the names Cincinnati Red Stockings and Cincinnati Redlegs. They played in the American Association from 1882 through 1889, and have played in the National League since 1890. The first game of the new baseball season for a team is played on Opening Day, and being named the Opening Day starter is an honor that is often given to the player who is expected to lead the pitching staff that season, though there are various strategic reasons why a team's best pitcher might not start on Opening Day. The Reds have used 76 Opening Day starting pitchers since they began play as a Major League team in 1882.

The Reds have played in several different home ball parks. They played two seasons in their first home ball park, Bank Street Grounds, and had one win and one loss in Opening Day games there. The team had a record of six wins and ten losses in Opening Day games at League Park, and a record of three wins and seven losses in Opening Day games at the Palace of the Fans. The Reds played in Crosley Field from 1912 through the middle of the 1970 season, and had a record of 27 wins and 31 losses in Opening Day games there. They had an Opening Day record of 19 wins, 11 losses and 1 tie from 1971 through 2002 at Riverfront Stadium, and they have a record of three wins and six losses in Opening Day games at their current home ball park, the Great American Ball Park. That gives the Reds an overall Opening Day record of 59 wins, 66 losses and one tie at home. They have a record of three wins and one loss in Opening Day games on the road.Mario Soto holds the Reds' record for most Opening Day starts, with six. Tony Mullane, Pete Donohue and Aaron Harang have each made five Opening Day starts for the Reds. José Rijo and Johnny Cueto have each made four Opening Day starts for Cincinnati, while Ewell Blackwell, Tom Browning, Paul Derringer, Art Fromme, Si Johnson, Gary Nolan, Jim O'Toole, Tom Seaver, Bucky Walters and Will White each made three such starts for the Reds. Harang was the Reds' Opening Day starting pitcher every season from 2006–2010. Among the Reds' Opening Day starting pitchers, Seaver and Eppa Rixey have been elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame.The Reds have won the World Series championship five times, in 1919, 1940, 1975, 1976 and 1990. Dutch Ruether was the Reds' Opening Day starting pitcher in 1919, Derringer in 1940, Don Gullett in 1975, Nolan in 1976 and Browning in 1990. The Reds won all five Opening Day games in seasons in which they won the World Series. In addition, prior to the existence of the modern World Series, the Reds won the American Association championship in 1882. White was their Opening Day starting pitcher that season, the franchise's first. Jack Billingham started one of the most famous Opening Day games in Reds history on April 4, 1974 against the Atlanta Braves. In that game, Billingham surrendered Hank Aaron's 714th career home run, which tied Babe Ruth's all time home run record.

Peter Donahue

Peter Donahue or Donohue is the name of:

Peter Donahue (businessman) (died 1885), founder of industrial San Francisco

Peter M. Donohue, Roman Catholic priest and president of Villanova University

Pete Donohue (1900–1988), baseball pitcher

Tom Baker (1930s pitcher)

Thomas Calvin Baker (June 11, 1913 – January 3, 1991), nicknamed "Rattlesnake", was an American Major League Baseball player. He was a pitcher for four seasons (1935–1938) with the Brooklyn Dodgers and New York Giants.

He died in 1991, and was interred at Greenwood Memorial Park in Fort Worth, Texas along with Pete Donohue and Jackie Tavener.

Languages

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.