Peerage of Great Britain

The Peerage of Great Britain comprises all extant peerages created in the Kingdom of Great Britain after the Acts of Union 1707 but before the Acts of Union 1800. It replaced the Peerage of England and the Peerage of Scotland, until it was itself replaced by the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1801.

The ranks of the Peerage of Great Britain are Duke, Marquess, Earl, Viscount and Baron. Until the passage of the House of Lords Act 1999, all Peers of Great Britain could sit in the House of Lords.

In the following table of peers of Great Britain, higher or equal titles in the other peerages are listed. Those peers who are known by a higher title in one of the other peerages are listed in italics.

Dukes in the Peerage of Great Britain

  •   Subsidiary title.
Title Creation Other Dukedom or higher titles
The Duke of Brandon 1711 Duke of Hamilton in the Peerage of Scotland.
The Duke of Manchester 1719
The Duke of Northumberland 1766

Marquesses in the Peerage of Great Britain

  •   Subsidiary title.
Title Creation Other Marquisette or higher titles
The Marquess of Lansdowne 1784
The Marquess Townshend 1787
The Marquess of Stafford 1786 Duke of Sutherland in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.
The Marquess of Salisbury 1789 Lord Gascoyne-Cecil for Life in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.
The Marquess of Bath 1789
The Marquess of Abercorn 1790 Duke of Abercorn in the Peerage of Ireland.
The Marquess of Hertford 1793
The Marquess of Bute 1796

Earls in the Peerage of Great Britain

  •   Subsidiary title.
Title Creation Other Earldom or higher titles
The Earl Ferrers 1711
The Earl of Dartmouth 1711
The Earl of Bristol 1714 Marquess of Bristol in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.
The Earl of Tankerville 1714
The Earl of Aylesford 1714
The Earl of Macclesfield 1721
The Earl Graham 1722 Duke of Montrose in the Peerage of Scotland.
The Earl Waldegrave 1729
The Earl of Harrington 1742
The Earl of Portsmouth 1743
The Earl Brooke 1746
The Earl of Buckinghamshire 1746
The Earl of Guilford 1752
The Earl of Hardwicke 1754
The Earl of Ilchester 1756
Earl of Warwick 1759 Held with the Earl Brooke in the Peerage of Great Britain.
The Earl De La Warr 1761
The Earl of Radnor 1765
The Earl Spencer 1765
The Earl Bathurst 1772
The Earl of Hillsborough 1772 Marquess of Downshire in the Peerage of Ireland.
The Earl of Ailesbury 1776 Marquess of Ailesbury in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.
The Earl of Clarendon 1776
The Earl of Mansfield 1776 Earl of Mansfield in the Peerage of Great Britain.
The Earl of Abergavenny 1784 Marquess of Abergavenny in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.
The Earl of Uxbridge 1784 Marquess of Anglesey in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.
The Earl Talbot 1784 Earl of Shrewsbury in the Peerage of England;
Earl of Waterford in the Peerage of Ireland.
The Earl Grosvenor 1784 Duke of Westminster in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.
The Earl Camden 1786 Marquess Camden in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.
The Earl of Mount Edgcumbe 1789
The Earl Fortescue 1789
The Earl of Mansfield 1792 Held with the Earl of Mansfield in the Peerage of Great Britain.
The Earl of Carnarvon 1793
The Earl Cadogan 1800
The Earl of Malmesbury 1800

Viscounts in the Peerage of Great Britain

  •   Subsidiary title.
Title Creation Other Viscountcy or higher titles
The Viscount Bolingbroke 1712 Viscount St John in the Peerage of Great Britain.
The Viscount St John 1716 Held with Viscount Bolingbroke in the Peerage of Great Britain.
The Viscount Cobham 1718
The Viscount Falmouth 1720
The Viscount Torrington 1721
The Viscount Leinster 1747 Duke of Leinster in the Peerage of Ireland
The Viscount Hood 1796
The Viscount Lowther 1796 Earl of Lonsdale in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.
The Viscount Duncan 1797 Earl of Camperdown in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.

Barons in the Peerage of Great Britain

  •   Subsidiary title.
Title Creation Other Barony or higher titles
The Lord Middleton 1711
The Lord Boyle 1711 Earl of Cork and Orrery in the Peerage of Ireland.
The Lord Hay 1711 Earl of Kinnoull in the Peerage of Scotland.
The Lord Onslow 1716 Earl of Onslow in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.
The Lord Romney 1716 Earl of Romney in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.
The Lord Newburgh 1716 Marquess of Cholmondeley in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.
The Lord Walpole 1723 Lord Walpole in the Peerage of Great Britain.
The Lord Monson 1728
The Lord Bruce 1746 Marquess of Ailesbury in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.
The Lord Ponsonby 1749 Earl of Bessborough in the Peerage of Ireland.
The Lord Vere 1750 Duke of St Albans in the Peerage of England.
The Lord Walpole 1756 Held by the Lord Walpole in the Peerage of Great Britain.
The Lord Scarsdale 1761 Viscount Scarsdale in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.
The Lord Boston 1761
The Lord Pelham 1762 Earl of Chichester in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.
The Lord Vernon 1762
The Lord Ducie 1763 Earl of Ducie in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.
The Lord Digby 1765 Lord Digby in the Peerage of Ireland.
The Lord Sundridge 1766 Duke of Argyll in the Peerage of Scotland and Peerage of the United Kingdom.
The Lord Hawke 1776
The Lord Brownlow 1776
The Lord Harrowby 1776 Earl of Harrowby in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.
The Lord Foley 1776
The Lord Cranley 1776 Earl of Onslow in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.
The Lord Dynevor 1780
The Lord Walsingham 1780
The Lord Bagot 1780
The Lord Southampton 1780
The Lord Grantley 1782
The Lord Rodney 1782
The Lord Eliot 1784 Earl of St Germans in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.
The Lord Somers 1784
The Lord Boringdon 1784 Earl of Morley in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.
The Lord Tyrone 1786 Marquess of Waterford in the Peerage of Ireland.
The Lord Carleton 1786 Earl of Shannon in the Peerage of Ireland.
The Lord Suffield 1786
The Lord Kenyon 1788
The Lord Howe 1788 Earl Howe in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.
The Lord Braybrooke 1788
The Lord Fisherwick 1790 Marquess of Donegall in the Peerage of Ireland.
The Lord Verulam 1790 Earl of Verulam in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.
The Lord Gage 1790 Viscount Gage in the Peerage of Ireland.
The Lord Thurlow 1792
The Lord Auckland 1793 Lord Auckland in the Peerage of Ireland.
The Lord Bradford 1794 Earl of Bradford in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.
The Lord Dundas 1794 Marquess of Zetland in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.
The Lord Mendip 1794 Earl of Normanton in the Peerage of Ireland.
The Lord Mulgrave 1794 Marquess of Normanby in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.
The Lord Yarborough 1794 Earl of Yarborough in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.
The Lord Loughborough 1795 Earl of Rosslyn in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.
The Lord Rous 1796 Earl of Stradbroke in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.
The Lord Stuart 1796 Earl of Moray in the Peerage of Scotland.
The Lord Stewart 1796 Earl of Galloway in the Peerage of Scotland.
The Lord Harewood 1796 Earl of Harewood in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.
The Lord Cawdor 1796 Earl Cawdor in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.
The Lord Carrington 1797 Lord Carrington in the Peerage of Ireland.
The Lord Bolton 1797
The Lord Minto 1797 Earl of Minto in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.
The Lord Lilford 1797
The Lord Wodehouse 1797 Earl of Kimberley in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.
The Lord Eldon 1799 Earl of Eldon in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.

References

Alexander Murray, 9th Earl of Mansfield

Alexander David Mungo Murray, 9th Earl of Mansfield, 8th Earl of Mansfield (born 17 October 1956), styled Lord Scone until 2015, is a British nobleman.

Baron Feversham

Baron Feversham is a title that has been created twice, once in the Peerage of Great Britain and once in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. The first creation, in the Peerage of Great Britain, came in 1747 when Anthony Duncombe, who had earlier represented Salisbury and Downton in the House of Commons, was made Lord Feversham, Baron of Downton, in the County of Wilts. He had previously inherited half of the enormous fortune of his uncle Sir Charles Duncombe. However, Lord Feversham had no sons and the barony became extinct on his death in 1763. The peerage was revived in the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1826 in favour of his kinsman Charles Duncombe, who was created Baron Feversham, of Duncombe Park in the County of York. He was a former Member of Parliament for Shaftesbury, Aldborough, Heytesbury and Newport. Duncombe was the grandson of Thomas Duncombe, son of John Brown (who assumed the surname Duncombe) by his wife Ursula Duncombe, aunt of the first Baron of the 1747 creation. Ursula had inherited the other half of her brother Sir Charles Duncombe's fortune. Lord Feversham son, the second Baron, sat as a Conservative Member of Parliament for Yorkshire and the North Riding of Yorkshire.

He was succeeded by his son, the third Baron. He represented East Retford and the North Riding of Yorkshire in the House of Commons as a Conservative. In 1868 he was created Viscount Helmsley, of Helmsley in the North Riding of the County of York, and Earl of Feversham, of Ryedale in the North Riding of the County of York. He was succeeded by his grandson, the second Earl, who sat in Parliament as a Conservative representative for Thirsk and Malton. He was killed in the First World War, when the titles were inherited by his son, the third Earl. He notably served as a Lord-in-waiting (government whip in the House of Lords) from 1934 to 1936 in the National Government. On his death in 1963 the viscountcy and earldom became extinct. However, he was succeeded in the barony of Feversham by his distant relative (his fourth cousin), the sixth Baron. He was the great-great-grandson of Admiral the Honourable Arthur Duncombe, fourth son of the first Baron. As of 2018 the title is held by his eldest son, the seventh Baron, who succeeded in 2009.

Several other members of the Duncombe family have also gained distinction. Anthony Duncombe, father of the first Baron of the 1747 creation, was Member of Parliament for Hedon. The aforementioned Sir Charles Duncombe, uncle of the first Baron of the 1747 creation, was a wealthy banker. Thomas Slingsby Duncombe, nephew of the first Baron of the 1826 creation, was a Radical politician. The aforementioned Admiral Arthur Duncombe, fourth son of the first Baron, was an Admiral in the Royal Navy and Member of Parliament. He was the father of 1) Arthur Duncombe, a Conservative Member of Parliament, and 2) George Augustus Duncombe, who was created a baronet in 1919 (see Duncombe baronets). The Very Reverend Augustus Duncombe (1814–1880), younger son of the first Baron, was Dean of York. The Honourable Octavius Duncombe, younger son of the first Baron, represented the North Riding of Yorkshire in Parliament.

The ancestral seat of the Duncombe family is Duncombe Park near Helmsley, Yorkshire.

Baron Raymond

Lord Raymond, Baron of Abbots Langley in the County of Hertford, was a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created on 15 January 1731 for Sir Robert Raymond, Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench. The title became extinct on the death of the second Baron in 1756.

Duke of Northumberland

Duke of Northumberland is a noble title that has been created three times in English and British history, twice in the Peerage of England and once in the Peerage of Great Britain. The current holder of this title is Ralph Percy, 12th Duke of Northumberland.

Earl Bathurst

Earl Bathurst, of Bathurst in the County of Sussex, is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain.

The medieval English word was Botehurst, thought to date at least from 13th century. Bote is the origination of Battle, although the family may have settled there post-dating the Conquest. This translated as 'a wood in a wood' which may in contradistinction have meant a clearing. The name of Apsley adopted by the family derived from Thakenham, near Pulborough in east Sussex, which may have referred to apse - lea or a 'church in a meadow'. The Bathurst estates were at Cirencester Park and Paulspury, Northamptonshire, which Bathursts inherited before the park was laid out in the Cotswolds.

Earl Cadogan

Earl Cadogan is a title that has been created twice in the Peerage of Great Britain for the Cadogan family. The second creation, in 1800, was for Charles Cadogan, 3rd Baron Cadogan.

Earl Spencer (peerage)

Earl Spencer is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain that was created on 1 November 1765, along with the title Viscount Althorp, of Althorp in the County of Northampton, for John Spencer, 1st Viscount Spencer. He was a member of the prominent Spencer family and a great-grandson of the 1st Duke of Marlborough. Previously, he had been created Viscount Spencer, of Althorp in the County of Northampton, and Baron Spencer of Althorp, of Althorp in the County of Northampton, on 3 April 1761.The future 6th Earl Spencer was created Viscount Althorp, of Great Brington in the County of Northampton, on 19 December 1905 in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. Diana, Princess of Wales, was the youngest of three daughters of the 8th Earl Spencer. Prince William, Duke of Cambridge and Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex are grandsons of the 8th Earl Spencer.

Earl Talbot

Earl Talbot is a title that has been created twice in the Peerage of Great Britain. This branch of the Talbot family descends from the Hon. Sir Gilbert Talbot (died 1518), third son of John Talbot, 2nd Earl of Shrewsbury. His great-great-great-grandson, the Right Reverend William Talbot, was Bishop of Oxford, of Salisbury and of Durham. His eldest son Charles Talbot was a prominent lawyer and politician. In 1733, he was raised to the Peerage of Great Britain as Lord Talbot, Baron of Hensol, in the County of Glamorgan, and then served as Lord Chancellor of Great Britain from 1733 to 1737.

He was succeeded by his eldest son, the second Baron. He served as Lord Steward of the Household from 1761 to 1782. In 1761, he was created Earl Talbot and in 1780, Baron Dynevor, of Dynevor in the County of Carmarthen, in the Peerage of Great Britain. The earldom was created with normal remainder to the heirs male of his body, while the barony was created with remainder to his daughter Cecil, wife of George Rice, and her issue male.

Earl of Carnarvon

Earl of Carnarvon is a title that has been created three times in British history. The current holder is George Herbert, 8th Earl of Carnarvon. The town and county in Wales to which the title refers are now usually spelled Caernarfon.

Earl of Dartmouth

Earl of Dartmouth is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1711 for William Legge, 2nd Baron Dartmouth.

Earl of Harrington

Earl of Harrington is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain that was created in 1742.

Earl of Lonsdale

Earl of Lonsdale is a title that has been created twice in British history, firstly in the Peerage of Great Britain in 1784 (becoming extinct in 1802), and then in the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1807, both times for members of the Lowther family.

This family descends from Sir Richard Lowther (1532–1607), of Lowther Hall, Westmorland, who served as Lord Warden of the West Marches.

Earl of Mansfield

Earl of Mansfield, in the County of Nottingham, and Earl of Mansfield, in the County of Middlesex, are two titles in the Peerage of Great Britain that have been united under a single holder since 1843.

Earl of Portsmouth

Earl of Portsmouth is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1743 for John Wallop, 1st Viscount Lymington, who had previously represented Hampshire in the House of Commons. He had already been created Baron Wallop, of Farleigh Wallop in Hampshire in the County of Southampton, and Viscount Lymington, in 1720, also in the Peerage of Great Britain.

The third Earl declared himself King of Hampshire and his brother had him declared insane.The fourth Earl represented Andover and Devonshire North in Parliament. In 1794, he assumed by Royal licence for himself and his issue the surname and arms of Fellowes only.

The fifth Earl resumed, without Royal licence, the family surname and arms of Wallop.

The sixth Earl represented Barnstaple in Parliament as a Liberal.

Oliver Henry Wallop, the eighth Earl, had moved from England to the United States, and been living the life of a rancher in Sheridan, Wyoming, at the time of the death of his older brother, the seventh Earl. Known as O.H. Wallop, he had served two terms a state representative in the Wyoming Legislature. He had become an American citizen in 1891, and was allowed to take his seat in the House of Lords only after renouncing American citizenship.The ninth Earl sat as Conservative Member of Parliament for Basingstoke.

The current holder is Quentin Wallop, 10th Earl of Portsmouth, who succeeded in 1984, is the only son of Oliver Kintzing Wallop, Viscount Lymington (1923–1984).

The American politician Malcolm Wallop was a grandson of the 8th Earl.

The family seat is Farleigh House, near Basingstoke, Hampshire.

Earl of Radnor

Earl of Radnor is a title which has been created twice. It was first created in the Peerage of England in 1679 for John Robartes, 2nd Baron Robartes, a notable political figure of the reign of Charles II. He was made Viscount Bodmin at the same time. Robartes was the son of Richard Robartes, who had been created Baronet in July 1621 and Baron Robartes, of Truro, in the Peerage of England in 1626. All three titles became extinct on the death of the fourth Earl in 1757. Anna Maria Hunt, great-niece of the fourth Earl, married the Hon. Charles Bagenal-Agar, youngest son of James Agar, 1st Viscount Clifden of Gowran. Their son Thomas James Agar-Robartes was created Baron Robartes in 1869. For more information on this title, see the Viscount Clifden.

The earldom was created for a second time in the Peerage of Great Britain in 1765 when William Bouverie, 2nd Viscount Folkestone, was made Earl of Radnor. The Bouverie family descends from William des Bouverie, a prominent London merchant. He was created a baronet, of St Catherine Cree Church, London, in the Baronetage of Great Britain in 1714. His eldest son, the second Baronet, represented Shaftesbury in the House of Commons. He was succeeded by his younger brother, the third Baronet. He sat as Member of Parliament for Salisbury until he was raised to the Peerage of Great Britain as Baron Longford and Viscount Folkestone in 1747.

His son, the second Viscount, also represented Salisbury in Parliament. In 1765 he was made Baron Pleydell-Bouverie, of Coleshill in the County of Berkshire, and Earl of Radnor. The earldom was created with remainder, failing heirs male of his body, to the heirs male of his father. Both peerages were in the Peerage of Great Britain. He was succeeded by his son, the second Earl. He was Member of Parliament for Salisbury and served as Lord Lieutenant of Berkshire. The second Earl assumed the additional surname of Pleydell after succeeding to the estates of his maternal grandfather, Sir Mark Stuart Pleydell, 1st Baronet (see Pleydell Baronets). His son, the third Earl, represented Downton and Salisbury in the House of Commons. On his death the titles passed to his son, the fourth Earl. He served as Lord Lieutenant of Wiltshire.

He was succeeded by his son, the fifth Earl. He sat as Conservative Member of Parliament for South Wiltshire and Enfield and held political office as Treasurer of the Household from 1885 to 1886 under Lord Salisbury. His son, the sixth Earl, represented Wilton (also known as South Wiltshire) in Parliament as a Conservative and served as Lord Lieutenant of Wiltshire. He was succeeded by his son, the seventh Earl. He notably held the honorary posts of Keeper of the Privy Seal and Lord Warden of the Stannaries and was made a Knight of the Garter in 1962. As of 2009 the titles are held by his grandson, also William Pleydell-Bouverie, the 9th Earl of Radnor, who succeeded his father in 2008.

Successive Earls of Radnor were governors of the French Hospital from the eighteenth century to 2015.The family seat are Longford Castle, near Salisbury, Wiltshire, and Alward House, near Alderbury, Wiltshire.

Earl of Tankerville

Earl of Tankerville is a noble title drawn from Tancarville in Normandy. The title has been created three times: twice in the Peerage of England, and once (in 1714) in the Peerage of Great Britain for Charles Bennet, 2nd Baron Ossulston. His father, John Bennett, 1st Baron Ossulston, was the elder brother of Henry Bennett, 1st Earl of Arlington.

The Earl of Tankerville holds the subsidiary title of Baron Ossulston, of Ossulston in the County of Middlesex (1682), in the Peerage of England.

Peerage of England

The Peerage of England comprises all peerages created in the Kingdom of England before the Act of Union in 1707. In that year, the Peerages of England and Scotland were replaced by one Peerage of Great Britain.

Until the passage of the House of Lords Act 1999, all Peers of England could sit in the House of Lords. (Women peers of England were only granted seats with the Peerage Act 1963.)

The ranks of the English peerage are, in descending order, Duke, Marquess, Earl, Viscount, and Baron. While most newer English peerages descend only in the male line, many of the older ones (particularly older baronies) can descend through females. Under English inheritance law all daughters are co-heirs, so many older English peerage titles have fallen into abeyance between various female co-heirs.

Baronets, while holders of hereditary titles, are not peers and not entitled to sit in the House of Lords (unless they also hold a peerage). Knights, Dames, and holders of other non-hereditary orders, decorations, and medals of the United Kingdom are also not peers.

In the following table, each peer is listed only by his or her highest English title (with the exception of the Duke of Norfolk/Earl of Arundel) showing higher or equal titles in the other peerages. Those peers who are known by a higher title in one of the other peerages are listed in italics.

Peerage of Ireland

The Peerage of Ireland consists of those titles of nobility created by the English monarchs in their capacity as Lord or King of Ireland, or later by monarchs of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. The creation of such titles came to an end in the 19th century. The ranks of the Irish peerage are Duke, Marquess, Earl, Viscount and Baron. As of 2016, there were 135 titles in the Peerage of Ireland extant: two dukedoms, ten marquessates, 43 earldoms, 28 viscountcies, and 52 baronies. The Crown of the United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland continues to exercise jurisdiction over the Peerage of Ireland, including those peers whose titles derive from places located in what is now the Republic of Ireland. Article 40.2 of the Irish Constitution forbids the state conferring titles of nobility and a citizen may not accept titles of nobility or honour except with the prior approval of the Government. As stated above, this issue does not arise in respect of the Peerage of Ireland, as no creations of titles in it have been made since the Constitution came into force.

In the following table, each peer is listed only by his or her highest Irish title, showing higher or equal titles in the other peerages. Those peers who are known by a higher title in one of the other peerages are listed in italics.

Viscount Hampden

Viscount Hampden is a title that has been created twice, once in the Peerage of Great Britain and once in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. The first creation came in the Peerage of Great Britain in 1776 for the diplomat and politician Robert Hampden, 4th Baron Trevor. The title of Baron Trevor, of Bromham, had been created in the Peerage of Great Britain in 1712 for his father, the lawyer Sir Thomas Trevor. Both titles became extinct in 1824 on the death of the first Viscount's second son, the third Viscount.

The viscountcy was revived in the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1884 when the Liberal politician and former Speaker of the House of Commons, Sir Henry Brand, was created Viscount Hampden, of Glynde in the County of Sussex. Brand was the second son of Henry Trevor, 21st Baron Dacre and in 1890 he succeeded his elder brother as the twenty-third Baron Dacre. His son, the second Viscount, represented Hertfordshire and Stroud in Parliament and served as Governor of New South Wales. On the death in 1965 of his grandson, the fourth Viscount, the barony of Dacre fell into abeyance between the late Viscount's daughters Hon. Rachel Leila Brand and the Hon. Tessa Mary Brand (the abeyance was terminated in 1970 in favour of Hon Rachel Leila Brand; see the Baron Dacre for more information). The viscountcy passed to the Viscount's younger brother, the fifth Viscount. As of 2014 the title is held by the latter's son, the sixth Viscount.

Several other members of the Brand family have also gained distinction. The Hon. Thomas Seymour Brand (1847–1916), second son of the first Viscount, was a rear-admiral in the Royal Navy. The Hon. Arthur Brand, third son of the first Viscount, was a Liberal politician. The Hon. Sir Hubert George Brand (1870–1955), second son of the second Viscount, was an admiral in the Royal Navy. The Hon. Robert Brand, fourth son of the second Viscount, was a civil servant and was created Baron Brand in 1946. The Hon. Roger Brand (1880–1945), fifth son of the second Viscount, was a brigadier-general in the Army.

Both Robert Hampden, 1st Viscount Hampden and Henry Brand, 1st Viscount Hampden were descendants in the female line of John Hampden, the patriot, hence their choice of title.

The family seat is Glynde Place, near Lewes, Sussex.

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