Paul Williams (songwriter)

Paul Hamilton Williams Jr.[2] (born September 19, 1940)[3][4] is an American composer, singer, songwriter and actor. He is known for writing popular songs performed by a number of acts in the 1970s, including Three Dog Night's "An Old Fashioned Love Song" and "Out in the Country," Helen Reddy's "You and Me Against the World," David Bowie's "Fill Your Heart" and the Carpenters' "We've Only Just Begun" and "Rainy Days and Mondays." Williams is also known for his musical contributions to films, including the Academy Award-nominated song "Rainbow Connection" from The Muppet Movie, and penning the lyrics to the #1 chart-topping song "Evergreen," the love theme from the Barbra Streisand vehicle A Star Is Born, for which he won a Grammy for Song of the Year and an Academy Award for Best Original Song. He wrote the lyrics to the opening theme for the television show The Love Boat, with music previously composed by Charles Fox, which was originally sung by Jack Jones and, later, by Dionne Warwick.[5]

Williams had a variety of high-profile acting roles, such as "Little Enos Burdette" in the action-comedy Smokey and the Bandit (1977) and the villainous Swan in Brian De Palma's Phantom of the Paradise (1974),[6] which Williams also co-scored, receiving an Oscar nomination in the process.[7]

Paul Williams
Paul Williams, ASCAP concert, 2011
Williams at the 2011 ASCAP concert[1]
Background information
Birth namePaul Hamilton Williams Jr.
BornSeptember 19, 1940 (age 78)
Omaha, Nebraska, United States
OriginLos Angeles, California, United States
Genres
Occupation(s)
  • Musician
  • songwriter
  • actor
  • writer
Instruments
  • Vocals
  • Keyboards
Years active1960s–present
LabelsA&M Records, Reprise Records, Portrait Records
Associated acts
Websitepaulwilliamsofficial.com

Early life

Williams was born in Omaha, Nebraska,[8] the son of Paul Hamilton Williams, an architectural engineer, and his wife, Bertha Mae (née Burnside), a homemaker.[2]

His father died in a car accident in 1953, when Williams was 13 years old, after which Williams grew up living with his aunt. As a result, Williams moved to Long Beach, California with his family and attended Woodrow Wilson Classical High School.

One of his brothers was John J. Williams, a NASA rocket scientist, who participated in the Mercury and Apollo programs and was awarded the NASA Distinguished Service Medal, their highest honor, in 1969.[9] His other brother was Mentor Williams, a songwriter as well who penned Dobie Gray's 1973 hit "Drift Away".

Musical career

Paul Williams 1974
Williams performing in 1974.

Williams began his professional songwriting career with Biff Rose in Los Angeles. The two men first met while working together on a television comedy show. Together, they wrote the song "Fill Your Heart" which was recorded by Rose on his first album, The Thorn in Mrs. Roses Side. Soon thereafter Tiny Tim covered it as the B-side of his hit "Tiptoe Through the Tulips" (1968). David Bowie also recorded a faithful version of the song on his album Hunky Dory (1971). Rose and Williams also wrote "I'll Walk Away" (recorded by Rose on his third, eponymous album). Rose was instrumental in getting Williams his break with A&M Records which resulted in Williams working with songwriter Roger Nichols. Williams and Nichols were responsible for a number of successful pop hits from the 1970s, including several hits for Three Dog Night (the aforementioned "An Old Fashioned Love Song", as well as "The Family of Man" and "Out in the Country"), Helen Reddy ("You and Me Against the World"), and the Carpenters, most notably "Rainy Days and Mondays", "I Won't Last a Day Without You", and "We've Only Just Begun", originally a song for a Crocker National Bank television commercial featuring newlyweds, and which has since become a cover-band standard and de rigueur for weddings throughout North America.

An early collaboration with Roger Nichols, "Someday Man", was covered by The Monkees (a group for which he auditioned but was not chosen)[10] on a 1969 single, and was the first Monkees' release not published by Screen Gems.

A frequent cowriter of Williams' was musician Kenneth Ascher. Their songs together included the popular children's favorite "Rainbow Connection", sung by Jim Henson (as Kermit the Frog) in The Muppet Movie (1979). They also wrote "You And Me Against The World", which became a Top 10 hit on Billboard for Helen Reddy in 1974.

Williams has worked on the music of a number of films, including writing and singing on Phantom of the Paradise (1974) in which he also starred and earned an Oscar nomination for the music, and Bugsy Malone (1976). Williams also wrote and sang the song "Where Do I Go From Here," which was used in the end credits of the Michael Cimino-directed film Thunderbolt and Lightfoot, which starred Clint Eastwood and Jeff Bridges. He contributed lyrics to the Cinderella Liberty song "You're So Nice to Be Around" with music by John Williams, and it earned them an Oscar nomination. Along with Ascher and Rupert Holmes, he wrote the music and lyrics to A Star Is Born (also 1976), with Barbra Streisand and Kris Kristofferson. The love ballad, "Evergreen", (lyrics by Paul Williams, melody by Barbra Streisand) from the movie A Star Is Born won the Academy Award for Best Original Song and a Grammy for Song of the Year. He has been nominated on other occasions for an Academy Award[11] and several Golden Globe Awards.[12]

In 1987 he wrote the songs performed by Dustin Hoffman and Warren Beatty in the film Ishtar.[13]

He wrote the music for a musical production of Happy Days that debuted in 2007 and also made a cameo appearance as an animated version of himself singing "Breathe in the Sunshine" in the hit animated series Dexter's Laboratory.[14] He wrote and sang "What Would They Say", the theme song from the made-for-television film The Boy in the Plastic Bubble (1976), a film starring John Travolta alongside Diana Hyland.

More recently, Williams wrote music and lyrics of "Silence is Our Song" for Richard Barone's acclaimed 2010 album Glow [15] and collaborated with Scissor Sisters on their second album, Ta-Dah.

In March 2012, it was announced that Williams had "written a couple of tunes" on Random Access Memories, the album of French electronic duo Daft Punk.[16] He co-wrote and sang vocals on "Touch" and co-wrote "Beyond". Williams and Nile Rodgers were the only featured artists to speak on behalf of Daft Punk at the 2014 Grammy Awards upon their receipt of the Album of the Year award for Random Access Memories. Williams told an anecdote about his work with Daft Punk: "Back when I was drinking, I would imagine things that weren't there and I'd get frightened. Then I got sober and two robots called and asked me to make an album." He also communicated a "message from the robots" to the audience: "As elegant and as classy as the Grammy has ever been is the moment when we saw those wonderful marriages and Same Love is fantastic. It is the height of fairness and love and the power of love for all people at any time in any combination. Captain Kirk uses the Enterprise. They sail on a ship called Generosity. They are generous in spirit ... This is a labor of love and we are all so grateful."[17]

Williams is a member of the Songwriters Hall of Fame,[18] and his songs have been performed by both pop and country music artists. In April 2009, Williams was elected President and Chairman of the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP).[19]

In September 2015, Williams, along with renowned bass player Kasim Sulton, led a global virtual songwriting collaboration at Hookist.com.[20] The mission was to write the 1st ever crowd-sourced anthem to be performed at FacingAddiction.org's concert and rally on The National Mall on October 4, 2015, headlined by Steven Tyler, Sheryl Crow and Joe Walsh among others.[21] The theme of the song was "Celebrate Recovery" and the goal was to reduce the stigma associated with addiction. Williams, Sulton and Dr. Mehmet Oz opened the show and led 10,000 people in a singalong of "Voice Of Change" at the base of the Washington Monument.[22] Sulton also led a singalong of the song on The Dr. Oz Show which quickly went viral.[23]

Film and television career

Although predominantly known for his music, Paul Williams has also appeared in films and many television guest spots, such as the Faustian record producer Swan in Brian DePalma's film Phantom of the Paradise (1974)—a rock and roll adaptation of The Phantom of the Opera, Faust, and The Picture of Dorian Gray, for which Williams also wrote the songs—and as Virgil, the genius orangutan in Battle for the Planet of the Apes (1973).

On February 9, 1973, Williams made a joke appearance on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson in which he sang a song in full make-up as Virgil.[24] He also played Migelito Loveless, Jr. in The Wild Wild West Revisited (1979), a reunion movie featuring the original cast of the television series The Wild Wild West, and played himself, singing a song to Felix Unger's daughter Edna, on the television series The Odd Couple in 1974. He made his film debut as Gunther Fry in the satire The Loved One (1965).

After appearing on The Muppet Show in 1976, Williams worked closely with Jim Henson's Henson Productions on The Muppet Movie, most specifically on the soundtrack, and even had a cameo in the movie as the piano player in the nightclub (who had a sign on the piano saying "Don't shoot piano player") where Kermit the Frog meets Fozzie Bear. He was also the lyricist for Emmet Otter's Jug-Band Christmas.

Williams was hired by TV producers Paul Junger Witt and Tony Thomas to write title tracks for two of their ABC comedies, It Takes Two (1982–1983), on which he also co-sang with Crystal Gayle, and Condo (1983), in which Williams' theme was sung by Drake Frye. Williams also composed and performed the theme to the McLean Stevenson sitcom The McLean Stevenson Show in 1976.[25]

Williams also composed, and sang "Flying Dreams" for the animated film The Secret of NIMH.

Williams has appeared in many minor roles. He provided the voice of The Penguin in Batman: The Animated Series. He appeared on an episode of Walker, Texas Ranger as a radio DJ covering a modern-day Bonnie and Clyde. He appeared in 2009 in an episode of Nickelodeon's children's show Yo Gabba Gabba! entitled "Weather", where he performed "Rainbow Connection". He has also appeared on Cartoon Network's Dexter's Laboratory where he played Professor Williams in an episode entitled "Just An Old Fashioned Lab Song".

He made numerous television appearances in the 1970s and 1980s, including on Hawaii Five-O, Match Game '79, Hollywood Squares, The Love Boat, Fantasy Island, The Hardy Boys, The Fall Guy, The Flip Wilson Special, and The Gong Show. He has also guest-starred in the Babylon 5 episode "Acts of Sacrifice" (Season 2 Episode 12) as Taq, the aide to Correlilmurzon, an alien ambassador whose species finalizes treaties and agreements by having sex with the other signees.

In a bit of subtle irony, Williams also appeared in the Star Trek: Voyager episode "Virtuoso" as the leader of a planet that has never heard music before. Williams appeared on an episode of Picket Fences as the brother of the just deceased Ginny Weedon (Zelda Rubinstein). While eulogising Ginny, he sings a small part of "Rainbow Connection". He starred as Ferdinand the Bull in a musical half-hour TV production of the same name written by the Sherman Brothers.

In October 1980, Williams was host of the Mickey Mouse Club 25th Anniversary Special on NBC-TV. He stated that he tried out for the show in early 1955 and was turned down. He was a frequent guest and performer on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson. He also appears as the man making the phone call at the beginning of the music video for Hank Williams Jr.'s song "All My Rowdy Friends Are Coming Over Tonight". In 2014, he appeared on Community[26] as an illegal textbook dealer who declines to purchase a batch of misprinted chemistry textbooks.[27] Williams appeared in the 2017 film Baby Driver as the Butcher, an arms dealer.

He portrayed the character of Little Enos Burdette in Smokey and the Bandit (1977), Smokey and the Bandit II (1980), and Smokey and the Bandit Part 3 (1983). He has a recurring role as a former lawyer and information source in 2018's season 2 of Goliath.

Personal life

Williams has been married three times. He has two children, Sarah and Cole Williams (born 1981), from his first marriage (1971) to Kate Clinton. In 1993 he married Hilda Keenan Wynn,[28] daughter of actor Keenan Wynn. He is now married to writer Mariana Williams.

In September 2011, director Stephen Kessler's documentary Paul Williams Still Alive premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival. Williams struggled with alcohol and substance abuse during the 1970s—1980s.[29]

Sober since 1990, Williams has been active in the field of recovery from addictions and became a Certified Drug Rehabilitation Counselor through UCLA. In 2014, he co-authored Gratitude and Trust: Recovery is Not Just for Addicts, with Tracey Jackson.[30]

Songwriting

Notable songs

TV themes (lyricist)

Notable recordings

Scores

Films

Theatre

  • Bugsy Malone (1997)
  • Happy Days (2007)
  • Emmet Otter's Jug-Band Christmas (2008)

Cinema songs

  • "Where Do I Go From Here" (composed and performed by Williams for Thunderbolt and Lightfoot) (1974)
  • "Evergreen (Love Song from A Star Is Born)" (lyrics written by Williams, Academy and Golden Globe winner for Best Original Song) (1976)
  • "Rainbow Connection" (co-composed by Williams for The Muppet Movie) (1979)
  • "Flying Dreams" (co-composed with Jerry Goldsmith and performed by Williams for The Secret of N.I.M.H) (1982)
  • "Still Alive" (composed and performed by Williams for Paul Williams Still Alive) (2011)
  • "I Love You Too Much" (for The Book of Life) (2014)
  • "What Would They Say?" (for The Boy in the Plastic Bubble starring John Travolta and Diana Hyland) (1976)
  • "When Love is Gone" (co-composed by Williams for The Muppet Christmas Carol) (1992)
  • "If We Could Remember" (co-composed with Jerry Goldsmith for The Sum of All Fears) (2002)

Discography

Albums

Year Title Label Chart[35] Notes
196? Words and Music by Paul Williams Big Seven Music Corp.
1970 Someday Man Reprise
1971 Just an Old Fashioned Love Song A&M 141
1972 Life Goes On A&M 159
1974 Here Comes Inspiration A&M 165
1974 A Little Bit of Love A&M 95
1975 Ordinary Fool A&M 146
1979 A Little on the Windy Side Portrait
1981 ...And Crazy for Loving You PalD
1997 Back to Love Again
2005 I'm Going Back There Someday AIX

Soundtracks

Year Title Label Chart Notes
1974 Phantom of the Paradise A&M
1976 Bugsy Malone Polydor
1976 A Star Is Born Columbia Motion Picture Soundtrack; with Kenny Ascher
1977 One on One: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack Warner Bros. Lyrics by Paul Williams, music by Charles Fox; performed by Seals and Crofts
1979 The Muppet Movie: Original Soundtrack Recording Atlantic by Paul Williams and Kenny Ascher
1982 The Secret of NIMH: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack MCA features songs written by Jerry Goldsmith; Paul Williams performs the song "Flying Dreams"

Compilations

Year Title Label Chart Notes
1974 The Best of Paul Williams A&M
1977 Classics A&M 155
1988 Paul Williams Pickwick
2004 "Evergreens: The Best of the A&M Years" (Hip-O Select)
  • The Holy Mackerel (with The Holy Mackerel [1969])
  • We've Only Just Begun (by Roger Nichols and Paul Williams)
  • Random Access Memories (Daft Punk) [2013]

Filmography

Films

Year Title Role Notes
1965 The Loved One Gunther Fry
1966 The Chase Seymour
1970 Watermelon Man
1973 Battle for the Planet of the Apes Virgil
1974 Phantom of the Paradise Swan
1977 Smokey and the Bandit Little Enos, a recurring role
1978 The Cheap Detective
1978 Hawaii Five-O Stringer
1979 The Muppet Movie the El Sleezo pianist
1979 Stone Cold Dead Julius Kurtz
1979 Wild Wild West Revisited
1980 Smokey and the Bandit II
1982 Rooster
1983 Smokey and the Bandit Part 3
1984 The Night They Saved Christmas ED, ELF
1987 Frog
1991 The Doors
1994 A Million to Juan
1995 Headless Body in Topless Bar
2002 The Rules of Attraction
2004 The Princess Diaries 2: Royal Engagement Lord Harmony
2007 Georgia Rule
2010 Valentine's Day Romeo Midnight (Narrator)
2011 Paul Williams Still Alive
2012 The Ghastly Love of Johnny X
2017 Baby Driver The Butcher

Video games

Television

List of voice performances on television
Year Title Role Notes
1991 The Last Halloween Gleep TV Short
Timeless Tales from Hallmark Frogbrauten Episode: "The Steadfast Tin Soldier"
1992 Fish Police Episode: "No Way to Treat a Fillet-dy"
1992-1994 Batman: The Animated Series The Penguin / Oswald Cobblepot 7 Episodes
1992-1993 The Pirates of Dark Water Garen 13 Episodes
1993 The Legend of Prince Valiant Grafton Commander / Brother John 2 Episodes
The Town Santa Forgot Pomp the Elf Christmas television special
1994-1995 Phantom 2040 Mr. Cairo 13 Episodes
1995 Aaahh!!! Real Monsters Izzith Episode: "Where Have All the Monsters Gone?"
The Tick Mother of Invention Episode: "Leonardo da Vinci and His Fightin' Genius Time Commandos!"
Captain Planet and the Planeteers Kujo Episode: "Five Ring Panda-Monium"
1998 The New Batman Adventures The Penguin / Oswald Cobblepot 4 Episodes
Dexter's Laboratory Professor Williams Episode: "Just an Old Fashioned Lab Song"
Superman: The Animated Series The Penguin / Oswald Cobblepot Episode: "Knight Time"
2015 Adventure Time The Hierophant Episode: "Stakes" Parts 2,3 And 5
2016-2018 Future-Worm! Future Danny 2 Episodes

References

Notes
  1. ^ Padua, Pat (May 12, 2011). "Pic(s) of the Week: They Write the Songs Edition". Library of Congress – In the Muse: Performing Arts Blog. Retrieved September 30, 2014.
  2. ^ a b "Paul Williams biography". Filmreference.com. Retrieved April 10, 2012.
  3. ^ "Paul Williams biography". Filmreference.com. Retrieved March 21, 2013.
  4. ^ Ankeny, Jason (September 19, 1940). "Paul Williams biography". Allmusic.com. Retrieved March 21, 2013.
  5. ^ Daly, Sean (August 23, 2016). "9 surprising facts about the 'Love Boat'". Fox News.
  6. ^ Staskiewicz, Keith (June 28, 2017). "Edgar Wright & Paul Williams In Conversation: Their Friendship, Working on 'Baby Driver' & Funeral Songs". Billboard.
  7. ^ "The 47th Academy Awards 1975". Oscars.org.
  8. ^ "Omaha Nebraska". City-Data.com. Retrieved June 3, 2014.
  9. ^ "National Aeronautics and Space Administration Honor Awards". SP-4012 NASA historical data book: volume IV NASA resources 1969-1978: NASA. Retrieved February 3, 2015.
  10. ^ Lurie, Karen (2002). "The Monkees". St. James Encyclopedia of Pop Culture.
  11. ^ "Academy Awards Database". Archived from the original on July 7, 2012. Retrieved February 8, 2008.
  12. ^ "Golden Globes Database". Archived from the original on January 29, 2008. Retrieved February 8, 2008.
  13. ^ "In Their Words – Paul Williams". ishtarthemovie.com. May 31, 2009. Retrieved September 19, 2017.
  14. ^ "www.paulwilliamscouk.plus.com". www.paulwilliamscouk.plus.com. Retrieved March 21, 2013.
  15. ^ "Richard Barone – Bar/None Records". Bar-none.com. Retrieved April 10, 2012.
  16. ^ "'The Muppets' songwriter to feature on new Daft Punk album?". Nme.Com. March 19, 2012. Retrieved April 10, 2012.
  17. ^ "Daft Punk wins big at Grammy Awards". Retrieved October 3, 2014.
  18. ^ "Songwriters Hall of Fame Bio". Archived from the original on October 1, 2006. Retrieved February 8, 2008.
  19. ^ "Songwriter Paul Williams Elected President and Chairman of ASCAP". Retrieved August 27, 2010.
  20. ^ "This Startup Will Let You Write A Song With Your Favorite Musician". Retrieved June 20, 2017.
  21. ^ "Unite To Face Addiction Lineup". Retrieved August 17, 2015.
  22. ^ "Paul Williams, Kasim Sulton and Dr Oz Lead 10,000 People Singing Anthem Created At Hookist". Retrieved October 7, 2015.
  23. ^ "Dr Oz Unite To Face Addiction". Retrieved September 23, 2015.
  24. ^ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bE2m355-JRoHe was "Little Enos Burdette" in Smokey and the Bandit.
  25. ^ http://www.metv.com/stories/which-mclean-stevenson-sitcom-deserved-a-better-chance
  26. ^ O'Neal, Sean. "Paul Williams will also be on Community". AV Club Newswire. The AV Club. Retrieved March 14, 2014.
  27. ^ Diego, Donald, "VCR Maintenance and Educational Publishing", Community, Sony Television
  28. ^ "Family for Keenan Wynn". Turner Classic Movies.
  29. ^ The arc of Williams life and substance abuse in the 1970s—'80s is detailed in the documentary Paul Williams Still Alive.
  30. ^ "Biography: Paul Williams Official". Retrieved December 20, 2017.
  31. ^ "Barbra Streisand Billboard Hot 100 chart history". billboard.com. March 5, 1977.
  32. ^ "Carpenters Billboard Adult Contemporary chart history". billboard.com. May 25, 1974.
  33. ^ "Carpenters Billboard Adult Contemporary chart history". billboard.com. May 29, 1971.
  34. ^ "Carpenters Billboard Adult Contemporary chart history". billboard.com. October 10, 1970.
  35. ^ Paul Williams - Billboard
  36. ^ https://www.aarp.org/entertainment/television/info-2018/billy-bob-thornton-news-interview.html
Bibliography
  • Skinner, Curtis (2001), Contemporary Authors Online, Detroit: Gale, ISBN 978-0-7876-3995-2
  • Williams, Paul; Jackson, Tracey (2015), Gratitude and Trust: Six Affirmations That Will Change Your Life, Plume, ISBN 978-0147517968

Bibliography

External links

Preceded by
Danny DeVito
Actors to portray the Penguin
1992–2004
Succeeded by
David Ogden Stiers (voice only)
An Old Fashioned Love Song

"An Old Fashioned Love Song" is a 1971 song written by Paul Williams and performed by the American pop-rock band Three Dog Night. Chuck Negron performed the lead vocal on this track. Taken as the lead single from their 1971 album, Harmony, the song peaked at number four on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in December 1971, becoming the band's seventh top-ten hit. It was Three Dog Night's first record to top the U.S. easy listening chart. It reached number two in Canada. Its lyrics suggest the straightforward and melodic nature of the tune: Just an old fashioned love song / Comin' down in three part harmony / Just an old fashioned love song / One I'm sure they wrote for you and me.

According to the Karen Carpenter biography Little Girl Blue by Randy L. Schmidt, Williams originally intended the song for The Carpenters, who were in the middle of a string of hits with their own brand of "old fashioned love songs," including two of Williams' own compositions, "We've Only Just Begun" and "Rainy Days and Mondays." Although this was the first song Williams had written specifically for the Carpenters, Richard Carpenter rejected it, and so Williams offered the song to Three Dog Night. The Carpenters never recorded the song, but did perform it live on television with Carol Burnett a few months later.

Close Enough for Love (song)

"Close Enough for Love" was the theme song from the 1979 film Agatha starring Dustin Hoffman and Vanessa Redgrave. The song has since become a jazz standard. It was composed by Johnny Mandel with lyrics by Paul Williams.It was the title song on albums by Peggy Lee in 1979 and Andy Williams in 1986. Other notable recordings of the song are by Tony Bennett, Monty Alexander, Lena Horne, Shirley Horn, Dianne Reeves and Marian McPartland.

Evergreen (Love Theme from A Star Is Born)

"Evergreen" (also called "Love Theme from A Star Is Born") is the theme song from the 1976 film A Star Is Born. It was composed and performed by Barbra Streisand with lyrics by Paul Williams, and arranged by Ian Freebairn-Smith. The song was released on the soundtrack album to A Star Is Born.

Flava in Ya Ear

"Flava in Ya Ear" is a single by American rapper Craig Mack. The original club mix single was released on 12" vinyl in July 1994 on the Bad Boy Entertainment record label, packaged with a series of additional remixes. According to the song's producer Easy Mo Bee, the track was originally intended for Apache, who was unable to record the song due to being on tour with the group Naughty by Nature at the time, and was not sure of future recordings at the time. As a result, Mo Bee gave the instrumental to Craig Mack after Bad Boy Records' founder Sean Combs gave him a substantial amount of money for the instrumental.The remix of the song features performances by The Notorious B.I.G., LL Cool J, Rampage and Busta Rhymes. It also contains Puff Daddy as a promoter and brief appearances by Keisha Spivey. The video features guest appearances by Das EFX, Mic Geronimo, Irv Gotti and Funkmaster Flex, although none perform on the song. The music video was directed by Craig Henry. The song received a Grammy Award nomination for Best Rap Solo Performance at the 37th Grammy Awards in 1995, losing to "U.N.I.T.Y." by Queen Latifah.

The song appeared on Bad Boy's 10th Anniversary... The Hits album. The single itself peaked at number nine on the Billboard Hot 100. It was certified Platinum by the RIAA and sold 1,000,000 copies in the United States. The remix version of the song appears in the video game Dance Central for the Xbox 360. In addition, the record can be heard in films such as the biographical drama Notorious, the 2015 biopic Straight Outta Compton, The Wackness and Morris from America.

"Flava in Ya Ear" contains a sample of "We've Only Just Begun" by O'Donel Levy, and was sampled in the Jennifer Lopez and Ja Rule single, "Ain't It Funny (Murder Remix)," as well as the song "Don't Leave Me" from the Backstreet Boys.

Happy Days (musical)

Happy Days is a musical with a book by Garry Marshall and music and lyrics by Paul Williams, based on the ABC TV series of the same name.

The story is set in approximately during Season 4 of the original sitcom. The story concerns the kids' plans to save Arnold’s from demolition by hosting a dance contest and wrestling match.

I Won't Last a Day Without You

"I Won't Last a Day Without You" is a song with lyrics written by Paul Williams and music composed by Roger Nichols. It became a hit single for the Carpenters in 1974, reaching number 11 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart and number one on the easy listening chart. It was the Carpenters' ninth number one on the easy listening chart.

In 1972, Richard Carpenter had learned of a new song by Williams and Nichols, who had already contributed "We've Only Just Begun" and "Rainy Days and Mondays" to the Carpenters. He included it on their 1972 album A Song for You, but it would not be released as a single until 1974. Before then, Diana Ross heard it and included it on her 1973 album Touch Me in the Morning, as well as the B side of the title track single release, which became a number-one hit. Williams released his version as a single in 1973, but garnered only minor success. Maureen McGovern recorded the song and also released it as a single in 1973 (and included on her album The Morning After), reaching #89 Billboard, #72 Cash Box and #14 Adult Contemporary. In Canada, her version reached #12 AC. The Carpenters' version was released as a single the following year.

Let Me Be the One (The Carpenters song)

"Let Me Be the One" is a song written in 1971 by Roger Nichols and Paul Williams. It first appeared on the 1971 album Carpenters by the Carpenters.

Love Boat (song)

"Love Boat" (also known as "Love Boat Theme" and "The Love Boat") is a 1977 song performed by American singer and actor Jack Jones, used as the theme song in American television series The Love Boat. It was later covered by numerous artists.

Out in the Country

"Out in the Country" is a song written by Paul Williams and Roger Nichols and performed by Three Dog Night. The song was produced by Richard Podolor, and was featured on their 1970 album, It Ain't Easy. In the US, "Out in the Country" peaked at number 11 on the US adult contemporary chart, and number 15 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart on October 17,1970. Outside the US, "Out in the Country" reached number 9 in Canada,

The song, released in the first year of Earth Day, was an early environmental advocacy record. The lyrics were about finding solace outside the city, "before the breathing air is gone..."

Rainbow Connection

"Rainbow Connection" is a song from the 1979 film The Muppet Movie, with music and lyrics written by Paul Williams and Kenneth Ascher. The song was performed by Kermit the Frog (Jim Henson) in the film. "Rainbow Connection" reached No. 25 on the Billboard Hot 100 in November 1979, with the song remaining in the Top 40 for seven weeks total. Williams and Ascher received an Academy Award nomination for Best Original Song at the 52nd Academy Awards.

Rainy Days and Mondays

"Rainy Days and Mondays" is a 1971 song by the Carpenters, with instrumental backing by L.A. session musicians from the Wrecking Crew, that went to number 2 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, It's Too Late/I Feel the Earth Move by Carole King kept it from number 1. "Rainy Days and Mondays" was the duo's fourth number 1 song on the Adult Contemporary singles chart. However, the song failed to chart in the United Kingdom until it went to number 63 in a reissue there in 1993. "Rainy Days and Mondays" was certified Gold by the RIAA.

The song was composed in 1971 by the then fairly unknown composers Roger Nichols and Paul Williams. It was released as the first track on the album Carpenters, popularly known as the Tan Album, and the B-side on the single is "Saturday", written and sung by Richard Carpenter.

Someday Man

Someday Man is the debut studio album by Paul Williams, released in 1970. Notable songs from the album include "Someday Man", "Trust" and "To Put Up with You". The song "Someday Man", written by Paul Williams and Roger Nichols, was first released by The Monkees (and sung by Davy Jones) on their 1969 single "Listen to the Band / Someday Man". Chuck Kaye was credited for direction.

In 2018 the album was re-issued on vinyl by Ship To Shore Phono Co. The deluxe package included two bonus tracks plus new liner notes by Williams, Roger Nichols, and Richard Barone.

Talk It Over in the Morning (song)

"Talk It Over in the Morning" is a single by Canadian country pop artist Anne Murray. Released in August 1971, it was the first single from her album Talk It Over in the Morning. It peaked at number 1 on the RPM Country Tracks chart.

The Family of Man (Three Dog Night song)

"The Family of Man" is a song written by Paul Williams and Jack Conrad, produced by Richard Podolor. It was most famously performed by Three Dog Night and featured on their 1971 album, Harmony.In the US, "The Family of Man" reached #12 on the Billboard chart, and #27 on the U.S. adult contemporary chart. Outside of the US, "The Family of Man" peaked at #5 in Canada,

The Muppet Movie (soundtrack)

The Muppet Movie: Original Soundtrack Recording is the soundtrack album from the 1979 film, The Muppet Movie, featuring the songs and select score written by Paul Williams and Kenneth Ascher. Originally released on LP by Atlantic Records, the album reached No. 32 on the Billboard 200, and was certified Gold by the Recording Industry Association of America. The soundtrack won the Grammy Award for Best Children's Album in 1980 and was also nominated for the Grammy Award for Best Score Soundtrack for Visual Media, the Golden Globe for Best Original Song, and two Academy Awards; Best Adaptation Score for the overall album and Best Original Song for "Rainbow Connection", which reached No. 25 on the Billboard Hot 100.After its initial release, the soundtrack album had subsequent CD reissues by Jim Henson Records in 1993 and by Walt Disney Records on August 13, 2013. Disney's reissue was digitally remastered, featured liner notes by Williams, and marked the first time the soundtrack was available in print in over 20 years.

We've Only Just Begun

"We've Only Just Begun" is a hit single by The Carpenters written by Roger Nichols (music) and Paul Williams (lyrics). Ranked at No. 405 on Rolling Stone magazine's list of "The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time", it is frequently used as a wedding song.

When the River Meets the Sea

"When the River Meets the Sea" is a song written by composer and lyricist Paul Williams for Jim Henson's 1977 HBO special Emmet Otter's Jug-Band Christmas. Emmet Otter, the title character, and his mother, Alice Otter sang this song together. The song was later sung by John Denver and Robin the Frog in the 1979 television special John Denver and the Muppets: A Christmas Together.

Though written for one Christmas story and featured in another, the lyrics are not holiday-related, but symbolic of death as a peaceful transition to an afterlife.

The song was performed by Jerry Nelson (the puppeteer of both Emmet Otter and Robin the Frog) and Louise Gold at Henson's memorial service in New York on May 21, 1990.

Robin, over 21 years later, (this time, being performed by Matt Vogel) sang this song with Jimmy Fallon and his Uncle Kermit (Steve Whitmire) on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon.

You're Gone (Diamond Rio song)

"You're Gone" is a song written by Paul Williams and Jon Vezner, and recorded by American country music group Diamond Rio. It was released in June 1998 as the lead-off single from their album Unbelievable. It peaked at number 4 in the United States and number 5 in Canada, in the Country charts of both territories.

You and Me Against the World (song)

"You and Me Against the World" is a song written by Kenny Ascher and Paul Williams, recorded by Helen Reddy for her 1974 album Love Song for Jeffrey.

"You and Me Against the World" was the first song written by Kenny Ascher and Paul Williams and began as a gag song: Williams and Ascher, a member of Williams's band, had a discussion about their favorite songwriters which led to the spontaneous composition of a song on the subject whose tune, Ascher then realized, had real hit potential.

Williams himself debuted "You and Me Against the World" on his 1974 album Here Comes Inspiration, singing it as a traditional love ballad. Helen Reddy considered the song's lyrics too "paternalistic" to be convincing as a woman's declaration of love for a man; instead, she interpreted the song as a mother singing to a child, which her version clarified by her daughter Traci's speaking to "Mommy" at the start and end.Released as the second single from Love Song For Jeffrey, "You and Me Against the World" reached #9 on the Billboard Hot 100 in September 1974 and became the fourth of Reddy's six consecutive Adult Contemporary Number Ones. The song did equally well in Canada.

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