Paul Olden

Paul Olden (born 1953)[1] is the current public address announcer for the New York Yankees at Yankee Stadium. He has been the announcer since the Yankees moved to their new ballpark in 2009.

Early life and career

Born in Chicago, Olden moved with his family to Los Angeles as a child.[2] He attended Dorsey High School and Los Angeles City College. Olden was formerly a radio and television play-by-play announcer for the Yankees, Tampa Bay Devil Rays, California Angels, Cleveland Indians, Philadelphia Eagles, UCLA Bruins, Los Angeles Rams, New York Jets, New Jersey Nets, and ESPN.[3]

Olden was the target of Los Angeles Dodgers manager Tommy Lasorda's infamous and profanity laden "Dave Kingman tirade" in 1978, in which Lasorda ranted at Olden (who worked at Los Angeles radio station KLAC at the time) when he asked him about Kingman having hit three home runs against the Dodgers that day.[4] He was also the PA announcer for 12 consecutive Super Bowls from 1994 to 2005.[5]

New York Yankees

Olden replaced Jim Hall, the successor to Bob Sheppard, who had been the Yankees announcer since 1951.[6][7]

References

  1. ^ https://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/06/nyregion/on-script-and-off-giving-voice-to-the-yankees.html
  2. ^ https://plus.google.com/109190588983911549895/about
  3. ^ KNX 1070 Personalities Archived 2009-02-24 at the Wayback Machine
  4. ^ SI.com's Top 10 Most Embarrassing TV/Radio Interview Moments
  5. ^ Olden can still hear the answer to one question
  6. ^ Paul Olden, public address announcer at Yankee Stadium, gets nod from 'Voice of God' Bob Sheppard
  7. ^ Yankees announcer Sheppard dies
Preceded by
Jim Hall (interim)
Yankee Stadium
public address announcer

2009 –
Succeeded by
(current)
1989 Cleveland Indians season

The 1989 Cleveland Indians season was their 89th season in the American League. For the 3rd consecutive season, the Indians had a losing record. The Indians had at least 73 wins for the 2nd consecutive season.

1990 California Angels season

The 1990 California Angels season involved the Angels finishing 4th in the American League west with a record of 80 wins and 82 losses.

2000 Tampa Bay Devil Rays season

The 2000 Tampa Bay Devil Rays season was their third since the franchise was created. This season, they finished last in the AL East division, and managed to finish the season with a record of 69-92. Their manager were Larry Rothschild, who entered his 3rd year with the club. This season is sometimes referred to as the "Hit Show" because the club signed several big-name sluggers in hopes of the team putting up better offensive numbers.

2001 Tampa Bay Devil Rays season

The 2001 Tampa Bay Devil Rays season was their fourth since the franchise was created. This season, they finished last in the AL East division, and managed to finish the season with a record of 62-100. Their manager were Larry Rothschild and Hal McRae, the latter whom replaced Rothschild shortly after the season began.

2003 Tampa Bay Devil Rays season

The 2003 Tampa Bay Devil Rays season was their sixth since the franchise was created. This season, they finished last in the AL East division with a record of 63-99. Their manager was Lou Piniella who entered his 1st season with the Devil Rays.

2004 Tampa Bay Devil Rays season

The 2004 Tampa Bay Devil Rays season was their seventh since the franchise was created. This season, they finished fourth in the AL East division, Toronto Blue Jays in last place. They managed to finish the season with a record of 70-91, finishing out of last for the first time in their 7-year history. Their manager was Lou Piniella who entered his 2nd season with the Devil Rays.

Dave Wills (sportscaster)

David Herbert Wills (born March 13, 1964) is an American sportscaster who, along with his broadcast partner Andy Freed, has served as the radio voice of the Tampa Bay Rays since 2005. Wills and Freed alternate play by play and color commentator duties during Rays game broadcasts, usually trading roles every three innings. Wills has signed several contract extensions with the Tampa Bay Rays Radio Network and signed another "multi-year" deal after the 2017 season.Wills was born and raised in the Chicago area and grew up as a "die-hard" White Sox fan. He played baseball and basketball at Oak Lawn Community High School, where he also wrote for the school newspaper. He attended Elmhurst College, where he pitched on the baseball team and worked for the school's newspaper until graduating with degrees in speech communications and urban studies in 1988. While in college, he also worked for SportsPhone, a call-in service that provided one minute of sports scores and updates for the Chicago area. After graduation, Wills served as the pitching coach/recruiting coordinator for the Elmhurst College baseball team in 1989 and as the interim head baseball coach at the University of Chicago in 1990.

Wills began his on-air broadcasting career covering sports for radio stations WMAQ and WMVP in the Chicago media market. His first play-by-play position was with the Class-A Kane County Cougars, for whom he was the radio voice from 1991 to 1995. From 1997 to 2004, Wills served as the pre-game and post-game analyst and back-up for John Rooney on the Chicago White Sox radio broadcasts. During the same period, he also co-hosted a daily sports talk radio show, hosted a local cable television sports show, hosted the pre- and post-game radio broadcasts for Notre Dame football and basketball, and did radio play-by-play for University of Illinois Chicago (UIC) basketball. Wills and Andy Freed were hired as the new broadcast team by the Rays before the 2005 season, replacing the club's original radio team of Paul Olden and Charlie Slowes.In 2016, Wills was inducted into the Irish-American Baseball Hall of Fame.

Jim Hall (announcer)

Jim Hall (May 30, 1933- June 12, 2017) was the public address announcer for New York Giants football games at MetLife Stadium, located in East Rutherford, New Jersey.

Las Vegas Aviators

The Las Vegas Aviators, formerly known as the Las Vegas 51s and Las Vegas Stars, are a Minor League Baseball team in the Pacific Coast League (PCL) and the Triple-A affiliate of the Oakland Athletics. They are located in Summerlin, Nevada, a community in Las Vegas. The Aviators play their home games at Las Vegas Ballpark, a new 10,000-seat facility. The team previously played at Cashman Field from 1983 to 2018.

The team won the PCL championship as the Stars in 1986 and 1988.

List of American public address announcers

This is a list of notable American public address announcers.

Chic Anderson – horse racing (best known for work at Belmont Park)

Alex Anthony – New York Jets and New York Mets

Pete Arbogast – Los Angeles Dodgers

Michael Baiamonte – Miami Heat

Dan Baker – Philadelphia Phillies

Rex Barney – Baltimore Orioles

Carl Beane – Boston Red Sox

Bruce Binkowski – San Diego Chargers, San Diego Clippers, San Diego Padres, and San Diego State Aztecs

Renel Brooks-Moon – San Francisco Giants

Charlie Brotman – U.S. presidential inauguration parades, Washington Senators, Washington Nationals

Michael Buffer – boxing

Dick Callahan – Oakland Athletics, and Saint Mary's College of California

Mike Carlucci – Los Angeles Dodgers, Anaheim Ducks, Los Angeles Kings, Summer Olympics Baseball & Winter Olympics hockey

Tom Carnegie – Indianapolis Motor Speedway, Indiana high school basketball

Joshua Carroll – University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Arkansas high school basketball, football, baseball, track & field

Bob Casey – Minnesota Twins

Tony Chimel – World Wrestling Entertainment

Michael Clapper – Washington Mystics

Ray Clay – Chicago Bulls Chicago Sky

Jody Dean – Dallas Cowboys

Sean Valley - Inglemoor Vikings, prev Lake Washington, Bothell, Redmond.

David Diamante – boxing

Sergeant Major Michael R. Dudley – United States Presidential Inaugural Swearing-in Ceremonies, Department of Defense, Military District of Washington, The United States Army Band (Pershing's Own), Boston Pops Orchestra

Mike "The Duke" Donegan – Tennessee Titans

J. Fred Duckett – Houston Astros

Tom Durkin – horse racing

Frank Fallon – NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championship

Sherm Feller – Boston Red Sox

Howard Finkel – World Wrestling Entertainment

Bob Ford – Houston Astros, University of Houston football

Paul Friedman – Chicago Cubs

Lilian Garcia – World Wrestling Entertainment

Phil Georgeff – horse racing

Marty Glickman – (sports announcer)

Halsey Hall – Minnesota Twins

Jim Hall – New York Giants football team, New York Yankees

Kevin Heilbronner – Greensboro Swarm

Gene Honda – Chicago White Sox, Chicago Blackhawks, DePaul University, NCAA Final Four, and Chicago PBS WTTW

Byron Hudtloff – Washington Valor, George Washington University Men's Basketball

Tom Hutyler – Seattle Mariners

Dwight Isenhoward - Winston Salem Dash, Catawba Indians, Elkin Buckin Elks

Andy Jick – Boston Celtics

Dave Johnson – horse racing

Wes Johnson – Washington Capitals

Stan Kelly – San Antonio Spurs

Sam Lagana – Los Angeles Rams

Jimmy Lennon, Jr. – boxing

Todd Leitz – Los Angeles Dodgers

Budd Lynch – Detroit Red Wings

John Magrino – Tampa Bay Buccaneers, NFL International Series, College Football Playoff National Championship, Orange Bowl, Outback Bowl

John Mason – Detroit Pistons

Dave McHugh – Baltimore Brigade

Bill Melton - Dallas Cowboys, Super Bowls VI, VIII and IX; 1996 Olympic Soccer; Texas Rangers; Cotton Bowl Classic; Texas Relays; SMU Football and Basketball; 1994 Men's World Cup Soccer; 2003 Women's World Cup Soccer; 2002 FIBA World Basketball Championships; Dallas Chaparrals Basketball; 2001 and 2005 Presidential Inaugural Parade and Ceremonies

Wayne Messmer – Chicago Cubs

Joel Meyers – St. Louis Cardinals

Paul Morris – Toronto Maple Leafs

Nick Nickson – Los Angeles Dodgers

Lou Nolan – Philadelphia Flyers

Paul Olden – New York Yankees

Eddie Palladino – Boston Celtics

Shawn Parker – Minnesota Timberwolves

Pat Pieper – Chicago Cubs

Ryan Pritt – Cleveland Indians

John Ramsey – Los Angeles Dodgers, Los Angeles Kings, Los Angeles Lakers, Los Angeles Rams, Los Angeles Angels, USC Trojans

Andy Redmond – Frederick Keys

Eric Smith – Los Angeles Clippers, Los Angeles Chargers, Los Angeles Dodgers

Alan Roach – Colorado Avalanche, Colorado Rapids, Minnesota Vikings, Super Bowl, Pro Bowl, NFL International Series, Olympic Hockey, Olympic Boxing

Dan Roberts – Utah Jazz

Justin Roberts – World Wrestling Entertainment

Stu Schwartz (aka Stuntman Stu) – Ottawa Senators

Olivier Sedra – Brooklyn Nets

Bob Sheppard – New York Yankees, New York Giants

Jeff Shreve – Cleveland Browns – University of Akron, Canton Charge, Mid-American Conference

Lawrence Tanter – Los Angeles Lakers

Mike Walczewski – New York Knicks

William Watson – IIHF, MLRH – Ice and Inline hockey.

Ralph Wesley – Washington Wizards

Joe Wowk – Lehigh Valley Phantoms

Dave Zinkoff – Philadelphia 76ers

List of Cleveland Indians broadcasters

The Cleveland Indians are currently heard on the radio on flagship stations WTAM 1100 AM and WMMS 100.7. Tom Hamilton and Jim Rosenhaus comprise the announcing team.On the television side, the games air on SportsTime Ohio (STO), with select games simulcast on WKYC channel 3 in Cleveland (NBC). Matt Underwood handles play-by-play duties with former Indian Rick Manning as analyst, and Andre Knott as field reporter.

Years are listed in descending order.

List of Los Angeles Angels broadcasters

One of the primary reasons why Los Angeles was awarded an American League expansion franchise for the 1961 season was because actor/singer turned broadcast mogul Gene Autry wanted to secure radio broadcast rights for the newly planned Los Angeles American League franchise. His KMPC (710 AM, now KSPN) was the radio home of the Los Angeles Dodgers, from the time they arrived from Brooklyn, New York in time for the 1958 baseball season, and actually came away from the 1960 Winter Meetings with his own baseball team.

List of New York Jets broadcasters

The Jets' flagship radio station is WEPN, 1050 ESPN, with "The Voice of the Jets," Bob Wischusen as the play-by-play announcer and former Jet Marty Lyons as the color analyst. Wischusen, who joined WABC in 1997, took over the play-by-play role in 2002 after Howard David left the organization earlier in the year. Lyons would join Wischusen the same year after the team began a re-evaluation of the broadcasting booth that would result in the surprising firing of Dave Jennings, "a smart and credible analyst," after fourteen years in the booth.WABC, which served three separate stints as the Jets' radio flagship, simulcasted WEPN's coverage over its airwaves from 2002 until 2008. Jets radio broadcasts have also been carried over WCBS, which also served two stints as the Jets' flagship and last carried games over the air in 1992, and WFAN, which aired games from 1993 through 1999.Any preseason games not nationally televised are shown on WCBS-TV. Ian Eagle, who was previously the radio voice of the Jets, calls the action on those telecasts. SportsNet New York, which serves as the home of the Jets, airs over 250 hours of "exclusive, in depth" material on the team in high definition.Notable past play-by-play announcers for the Titans/Jets include the legends Howard Cosell, Bob Murphy, Merle Harmon, Marty Glickman and Howard David, who has called the Super Bowl and the NBA Finals for Westwood One and ESPN Radio.

List of New York Yankees broadcasters

As one of the most successful clubs in Major League Baseball, the New York Yankees are also one of its oldest teams. Part of that success derives to its radio and television broadcasts that have been running beginning in 1939 when the first radio transmissions were broadcast from the old stadium, and from 1947 when television broadcasts began. They have been one of the pioneer superstation broadcasts when WPIX became a national superstation in 1978 and were the first American League team to broadcast their games on cable, both first in 1978 and later on in 1979, when Sportschannel NY (now MSG Plus) began broadcasting Yankees games to cable subscribers. Today, the team can be heard and/or seen in its gameday broadcasts during the baseball season on:

TV: YES Network or WPIX channel 11 in New York

Radio: WFAN 660AM and WFAN-FM 101.9 FM in New York; New York Yankees Radio Network; WADO 1280 AM (Spanish) (Cadena Radio Yankees)Longest serving Yankee broadcasters (all-time with 10+ years)

Phil Rizzuto (40 yrs), John Sterling (31 yrs), Mel Allen (30 yrs), Michael Kay (28 yrs), Bobby Murcer (22 yrs), Ken Singleton (23 yrs), Frank Messer (18 yrs), Bill White (18 yrs), Suzyn Waldman (15 yrs), Red Barber (13 yrs), Jim Kaat (13 yrs), Al Trautwig (12 yrs)

List of Tampa Bay Rays broadcasters

Broadcasters for the Tampa Bay Rays Major League Baseball team.

Norm Hitzges

Norman Richard "Norm" Hitzges (born July 5, 1944) is an author and sports talk radio host at KTCK (1310 AM / 96.7 FM, "SportsRadio 1310 The Ticket") in Dallas, and a Texas Radio Hall of Fame member. Hitzges pioneered radio sports talk in the morning at KLIF radio at a time when sports talk was mainly on in the evening. Hitzges moved to (former rival) KTCK in early 2000 after 15 years at sister station KLIF when the latter removed sports talk programming from its lineup. Hitzges also serves as the television play-by-play voice of the Dallas Sidekicks.He has also provided major league baseball commentary for ESPN. Hitzges is known for his enthusiasm and knowledge of sports trivia and has been compared to Dick Vitale for his energy and love of sports. Hitzges has been honored by the Dallas All Sports Association and the Texas Baseball Hall of Fame.Hitzges also hosts "Norm-A-Thon", a yearly 18-hour marathon broadcast to raise money for the Austin Street Center, a Dallas area homeless shelter. Hitzges has also been a long-time supporter of Texans! Can Academy, an organization that provides at-risk youths with education and training.

Weekly segments on his show include “The Birdhouse,” “Shuttle Run,” “The Meatheads of the Week,” and “The Weekend-around.”

Since 2010, Hitzges and his wife have lived in the Dallas suburb of Little Elm, Texas.

Susan Miller Dorsey High School

Susan Miller Dorsey High School is a high school located in Los Angeles, California. It is a part of the Los Angeles Unified School District. The school serves Baldwin Hills, Baldwin Village, Jefferson Park, Leimert Park, and portions of Crenshaw and West Adams.

Tampa Bay Rays

The Tampa Bay Rays are an American professional baseball team based in St. Petersburg, Florida. The Rays compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member of the American League (AL) East division. Since its inception, the team's home venue has been Tropicana Field.

Following nearly three decades of unsuccessfully trying to gain an expansion franchise or enticing existing teams to relocate to the Tampa Bay Area, an ownership group led by Vince Naimoli was approved on March 9, 1995. The Tampa Bay Devil Rays began play in the 1998 Major League Baseball season.

Their first decade of play, however, was marked by futility; they finished in last place in the AL East in all but the 2004 season, when they finished second-to-last. Following the 2007 season, Stuart Sternberg, who had purchased controlling interest in the team from Vince Naimoli two years earlier, changed the team's name from "Devil Rays" to "Rays", now meant to primarily refer to a burst of sunshine rather than a manta ray, though a manta ray logo remains on the uniform sleeves. The 2008 season saw the Tampa Bay Rays post their first winning season, their first AL East championship, and their first pennant (defeating the rival Boston Red Sox in the ALCS), though they lost to the Philadelphia Phillies in that year's World Series. Since then, the Rays have played in the postseason in 2010, 2011, and 2013.

The Tampa Bay Rays' chief rivals are the Boston Red Sox and the New York Yankees. Regarding the former, there have been several notable on-field incidents. The Rays also have an intrastate interleague rivalry with the National League (NL)'s Miami Marlins (originally the Florida Marlins), whom they play in the Citrus Series.

Franchise
Ballparks
Culture
Lore
Rivalries
Monument Park
honorees
Key personnel
Championships (27)
American League
Pennants (40)
Division titles (17)
Wild Card titles (7)
Minors

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