Patsy Dougherty

Patrick Henry "Patsy" Dougherty (October 27, 1876 – April 30, 1940) was a Major League Baseball outfielder from 1902 to 1911. He played for the Boston Americans (now the Boston Red Sox), the New York Highlanders (now the New York Yankees), and the Chicago White Sox.

On July 29, 1903, Dougherty became the second Red Sox player (then known as the Americans) to hit for the cycle.[1] In Game 2 of the 1903 World Series, the first modern World Series, Dougherty became the first player to accomplish several feats; he became the first Boston player to hit a World Series home run,[2] the first player to hit two home runs in a single World Series game, and the first player to hit a leadoff inside-the-park home run in a World Series game (a feat not matched until the 2015 World Series, by Alcides Escobar of the Kansas City Royals in Game 1).

In a 10-year major league career, covering 1233 games, Dougherty compiled a .284 batting average (1294-for-4558) with 678 runs, 17 home runs, 413 RBI and 261 stolen bases. In his two postseason appearances, in the 1903 and '06 World Series, he batted .185 (10-for-54) with 2 home runs and 6 RBI.

Dougherty died in Bolivar, New York, at the age of 63 and was buried at St. Mary Catholic Cemetery in Bolivar.[3]

Patsy Dougherty
Patsy dougherty baseball card
Outfielder
Born: October 27, 1876
Andover, New York
Died: April 30, 1940 (aged 63)
Bolivar, New York
Batted: Left Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 19, 1902, for the Boston Americans
Last MLB appearance
September 22, 1911, for the Chicago White Sox
MLB statistics
Batting average.284
Home runs17
Run batted in413
Teams
Career highlights and awards

See also

References

  1. ^ Smith, Christopher (June 17, 2015). "List of the 20 Boston Red Sox players who have hit for the cycle starting with Brock Holt". masslive.com. Retrieved October 19, 2017.
  2. ^ BaseballLibrary.com Archived 2006-10-05 at the Wayback Machine. Retrieved October 24, 2006.
  3. ^ Baseball-Almanac.com. Retrieved October 24, 2006.

Further reading

External links

Achievements
Preceded by
Buck Freeman
Hitting for the cycle
July 29, 1903
Succeeded by
Bill Bradley
1902 Boston Americans season

The 1902 Boston Americans season was the second season for the professional baseball franchise that later became known as the Boston Red Sox. The Americans finished third in the American League (AL) with a record of 77 wins and 60 losses, ​6 1⁄2 games behind the Philadelphia Athletics. The team was managed by Jimmy Collins and played their home games at Huntington Avenue Grounds.

1903 Boston Americans season

The 1903 Boston Americans season was the third season for the professional baseball franchise that later became known as the Boston Red Sox. The Americans finished first in the American League (AL) with a record of 91 wins and 47 losses, ​14 1⁄2 games ahead of the Philadelphia Athletics. Boston went on to participate in the first World Series held between the AL and National League (NL) champions. The Americans won the 1903 World Series in eight games over the Pittsburgh Pirates. The team was managed by Jimmy Collins and played their home games at Huntington Avenue Grounds.

1903 Major League Baseball season

The 1903 Major League Baseball season, saw the relocation of the original Baltimore Orioles to New York City, and become the Highlanders, the last relocation in MLB until 1953, when the Boston Braves moved to Milwaukee, along with the playing of the first modern World Series with the Boston Americans defeating the Pittsburgh Pirates.

1903 Pittsburgh Pirates season

The 1903 Pittsburgh Pirates season was the 22nd year the Pittsburgh Pirates played in Major League Baseball. The club finished their season as National League champions, beating the second-place New York Giants by 6½ games. They went on to participate in the 1903 World Series, the first to be played between the champions of the National League and American League. The Pirates started off well, winning 3 of the first four games, but the Boston Americans won the last four straight to win the series five games to three. The Pirates set a record of 52 consecutive innings without allowing the opposing team to score a run, a record that still stands today.

1903 World Series

Template:In'''fobox World Series Expanded

The 1903 World Series was the first modern World Series to be played in Major League Baseball. It matched the American League (AL) champion Boston Americans against the National League (NL) champion Pittsburgh Pirates in a best-of-nine series, with Boston prevailing five games to three, winning the last four.

Pittsburgh pitcher Sam Leever injured his shoulder while trap-shooting, so his teammate Deacon Phillippe pitched five complete games. Phillippe won three of his games, but it was not enough to overcome the club from the new American League. Boston pitchers Bill Dinneen and Cy Young led Boston to victory. In Game 1, Phillippe struck out ten Boston batters. The next day, Dinneen bettered that mark, striking out eleven Pittsburgh batters in Game 2.

Honus Wagner, bothered by injuries, batted only 6 for 27 (.222) in the Series and committed six errors. The shortstop was deeply distraught by his performance. The following spring, Wagner (who in 1903 led the league in batting average) refused to send his portrait to a "Hall of Fame" for batting champions. "I was too bum last year", he wrote. "I was a joke in that Boston-Pittsburgh Series. What does it profit a man to hammer along and make a few hits when they are not needed only to fall down when it comes to a pinch? I would be ashamed to have my picture up now."Due to overflow crowds at the Exposition Park games in Allegheny City, if a batted ball rolled under a rope in the outfield that held spectators back, a "ground-rule triple" would be scored. Seventeen ground-rule triples were hit in the four games played at the stadium.In the series, Boston came back from a three games to one deficit, winning the final four games to capture the title. Such a large comeback would not happen again until the Pirates came back to defeat the Washington Senators in the 1925 World Series, and has happened only eleven times in baseball history. (The Pirates themselves repeated this feat in 1979 against the Baltimore Orioles.) Much was made of the influence of Boston's "Royal Rooters", who traveled to Exposition Park and sang their theme song "Tessie" to distract the opposing players (especially Wagner). Boston wound up winning three out of four games in Allegheny City.

Pirates owner Barney Dreyfuss added his share of the gate receipts to the players' share, so the losing team's players actually finished with a larger individual share than the winning team's.

The Series brought the new American League prestige and proved its best could beat the best of the National League, thus strengthening the demand for future World Series competitions.

1903 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1903 throughout the world.

1904 Boston Americans season

The 1904 Boston Americans season was the fourth season for the professional baseball franchise that later became known as the Boston Red Sox. The Americans finished first in the American League (AL) with a record of 95 wins and 59 losses, ​1 1⁄2 games ahead of the New York Highlanders. The team was managed by Jimmy Collins and played its home games at Huntington Avenue Grounds. The Americans were set to play the National League (NL) champion New York Giants in the 1904 World Series, however the Giants refused to play.

1904 New York Highlanders season

The 1904 New York Highlanders season, their second in New York and fourth overall, finished with the team in second place in the American League with a record of 92–59. The team was managed by Clark Griffith and played home games at Hilltop Park.

1905 New York Highlanders season

The 1905 New York Highlanders season was a season in American baseball. It was the team's third season in New York and fifth overall. The Highlanders finished in sixth place in the American League with a record of 71–78. The team was managed by Clark Griffith and played its home games at Hilltop Park.

1906 Chicago White Sox season

The 1906 season was the seventh season overall for the Chicago White Sox, and their sixth season in the major leagues. The Sox won their second American League pennant and their first World Series championship. The Sox won 93 games, a plateau they would not reach again until the 1915 season.

1906 New York Highlanders season

The 1906 New York Highlanders season, its fourth in New York and sixth overall, finished with the team in 2nd place in the American League with a record of 90–61. The team was managed by Clark Griffith and played its home games at Hilltop Park.

1906 World Series

The 1906 World Series featured a crosstown matchup between the Chicago Cubs, who had posted the highest regular-season win total (116) and winning percentage (.763) in the major leagues since the advent of the 154-game season; and the Chicago White Sox. The White Sox, known as the "Hitless Wonders" after finishing with the worst team batting average (.230) in the American League, beat the Cubs in six games for one of the greatest upsets in Series history. This was the first World Series played by two teams from the same metropolitan area.

The teams split the first four games; then the Hitless Wonders (a name coined by sportswriter Charles Dryden) exploded for 26 hits in the last two games. True to their nickname, the White Sox hit only .198 as a team in winning the series but it beat the .196 average produced by the Cubs.

In Game 3, Ed Walsh struck out 12 Cubs, breaking the previous record of 11 set by Bill Dinneen in 1903.

The 1906 Series was the first to be played between two teams from the same city. To date, it remains the only World Series played between the two Chicago teams (In fact, it would be another 102 years before both Chicago teams would qualify for the playoffs during the same season, as this was next accomplished in 2008), and one of only two Series (the other being the 1944 World Series) played outside New York City that featured two teams from the same city (although the 1989 World Series was played between the San Francisco Giants and the Oakland Athletics, which are roughly 10 miles apart). This is also the most recent World Series where both teams were making their first appearance in the Fall Classic.

1909 Chicago White Sox season

The 1909 Chicago White Sox season was a season in Major League Baseball. The White Sox finished fourth in the American League with a record of 78 wins and 74 losses.

Bob Unglaub

Robert Alexander Unglaub (July 31, 1881 – November 29, 1916) was an American first baseman, utility infielder and manager in Major League Baseball who played for the New York Highlanders, Boston Americans, and Washington Senators.

Born in Baltimore, Maryland, he attended the University of Maryland, and in 1904 he was offered his first shot at the major leagues, being signed by the Highlanders. Due to blood poisoning, he was only able to play six games, and was sent to the Americans for Patsy Dougherty, which some people perceived as the American League's attempt to increase competition against the National League's New York Giants. He didn't become a regular player until the 1907 season when he also served as manager of the Red Sox, replacing George Huff. He went 9–20 (.310) in his only managerial stint.

Unglaub had a series of minor league managerial jobs, and in 1916, while supervising repair work on a locomotive, he was killed in an accident in his hometown of Baltimore at age 35. He was laid to rest at Sunny Ridge Memorial Park in Crisfield, Maryland.

Cy Young's perfect game

Cy Young, pitcher for the Boston Americans, pitched a perfect game against the Philadelphia Athletics by retiring all 27 batters he faced on Thursday, May 5, 1904. This event took place in the Huntington Avenue Grounds in Boston, Massachusetts, in front of 10,267 fans in attendance.

After Athletics' pitcher Rube Waddell defeated Young on April 25 and one-hit Boston on May 2, Waddell taunted Young to face him so that he could repeat his performance against Boston's ace. Three days later, Young pitched a perfect game against Waddell and the Athletics. The third perfect game in Major League Baseball history, Young's perfect game was the first in baseball's modern era and in American League history.

Inside-the-park home run

In baseball, an inside-the-park home run is a play where a batter hits a home run without hitting the ball out of the field of play. It is also known as an "in-the-park home run" or "in the park homer".

Patrick Dougherty

Patrick Dougherty may refer to:

Patrick Dougherty (bishop) (1931–2010), Australian Roman Catholic bishop

Patrick Dougherty (Medal of Honor) (1844–?), American Civil War sailor and Medal of Honor recipient

Pat Dougherty (born 1948), American politician, Missouri state legislator

Patsy Dougherty (1876–1940), American baseball player

Charles "Pat" Dougherty (1879-1939), American baseball player in the pre-Negro Leagues

Patrick Dougherty (artist) (born 1945), American artist and sculptor who works with saplings and other natural materials

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