Patrick Peterson

Patrick De'mon Peterson Jr. (born July 11, 1990) is an American football cornerback for the Arizona Cardinals of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Louisiana State University (LSU), where he won the Chuck Bednarik Award as the best defensive player in the country, the Jim Thorpe Award as the best defensive back, and was unanimously recognized as an All-American. He was selected fifth overall by the Cardinals in the first round of the 2011 NFL Draft. Peterson has been invited to the Pro Bowl in each of his first eight seasons in the NFL.[1]

Patrick Peterson
refer to caption
Peterson with the Arizona Cardinals in 2014
No. 21 – Arizona Cardinals
Position:Cornerback
Personal information
Born:July 11, 1990 (age 28)
Pompano Beach, Florida, U.S.
Height:6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Weight:203 lb (92 kg)
Career information
High school:Blanche Ely
(Pompano Beach, Florida)
College:LSU
NFL Draft:2011 / Round: 1 / Pick: 5
Career history
Roster status:Active
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics as of 2018
Total tackles:385
Pass deflections:76
Interceptions:23
Forced fumbles:1
Fumble recoveries:3
Total touchdowns:5
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Early years

Peterson was born in Pompano Beach, Florida on July 11, 1990. He attended Blanche Ely High School, where he played running back and defensive back for the Blanche Ely Mighty Tigers high school football team.[2] As a junior, he recorded 11 total touchdowns on offense, while recording seven interceptions and 54 tackles on defense. He returned three kick-offs for touchdowns and added 10 rushes for 213 yards. As a senior, Peterson compiled 733 yards rushing and 11 touchdowns (9 rushing, one kick return and one punt return). Defensively, he had 21 tackles and five interceptions. Besides numerous All-American team selections, Peterson was named Defensive Player of the Year by USA Today and played in the 2008 U.S. Army All-American Bowl.[3]

He was also on the school's track & field team, where he ran the 100 meters in 10.92 seconds and the 200 meters in 22.24 seconds. He was also a member of the 4 × 100 m relay (41.41 s) squad.[4]

Recruiting

A consensus five-star prospect by all major recruiting services, Peterson was rated as the nation's fifth best overall player by Rivals.com and No. 8 by ESPN. Prior to his senior season, he verbally committed to play for the University of Miami, but continued to look at other schools.[5] By November 2007, Peterson had reopened his recruiting process and acknowledged interest in Georgia, USC, Florida, and LSU.[6] He later dropped Georgia and USC from his list and added Florida State,[7] but eventually announced his decision to attend LSU at the U.S. Army All-American Bowl.[8]

College career

Peterson attended Louisiana State University, where he played for coach Les Miles's LSU Tigers football team from 2008 to 2010.[9]

Freshman year

One of the most decorated high school players to ever attend LSU, Peterson played 13 games as a true freshman. On November 8, against SEC West rival Alabama, he had his first collegiate interception.[10] He started the final four games of season, including the Chick-fil-A Bowl win over Georgia Tech.[11] Peterson finished the season with 41 tackles, one interception, and three pass breakups, while also adding a forced fumble and a quarterback hurry.[12]

Sophomore year

In his sophomore season, Peterson emerged as one of the top defensive backs in the Southeastern Conference. On September 26, against Mississippi State, he had a 37-yard interception return for a touchdown.[13] In a game against standout wide receiver A. J. Green of Georgia,[14] Peterson was able to hold Green to just four catches.[15][16]

By mid-season, Peterson tied for fourth in the league with seven passes defended, and was named the SEC's "Most Improved Player" by ESPN's Chris Low.[17]

Another highly anticipated match-up occurred when Peterson went against Julio Jones of Alabama.[18] Peterson's LSU Tigers were ranked ninth in the country and traveled to face Nick Saban and the #1 ranked Crimson Tide. The Tigers were down by six points late in the fourth quarter when Peterson stepped in front of a pass from quarterback Greg McElroy to Julio Jones for what seemed like an interception. Multiple CBS camera angles showed that Peterson was able to get at least one foot in bounds.[19] However, even after review, the SEC officiating crew called the pass incomplete, saying that Peterson was not able to get any foot in bounds. Alabama would go on to kick a field goal on that drive and won 24–15. The missed interception call quickly became infamous and was debated by many media outlets.[20][21]

Peterson finished 2009 with 52 tackles.[22] His 43 solo tackles were second on the team behind linebacker Kelvin Sheppard. Peterson returned an interception for a touchdown against Mississippi State, and he returned a blocked field goal against Ole Miss for a touchdown. He was also named a 2009 Second-Team All-American by The Sporting News, a 2009 First-Team All-SEC performer by ESPN, and a 2009 Second-Team All-SEC performer by the AP.[15]

Junior year

Peterson was named to the preseason watch lists for the Nagurski Award, the Thorpe Award, the Ronnie Lott Award, the Walter Camp Award, and the Chuck Bednarik Award. It was announced during the summer of 2010 that Peterson would begin returning punts and kickoffs due to his size, speed, and athleticism. With this added dimension to his game, and his dominance as a cornerback, Peterson began being mentioned as a dark horse for the 2010 Heisman Trophy award, presented to the best college football player every year.[23] Only one defensive player has ever won the Heisman Trophy, Charles Woodson.[24]

Peterson began his Heisman campaign against North Carolina in the 2010 Chick-fil-A Kickoff Game. The Tigers won 30–24 and Peterson was terrific.[25] In his debut as a returner, Peterson had a school-record 257 yards returning punts and kickoffs, 244 yards coming in the first half. He returned a punt 87 yards for a touchdown and consistently gave the Tiger's offense good field position. His 257-yard performance ranks second all-time in the SEC behind Mississippi State's Nick Turner and his 266-yard performance. Peterson was named Special Teams Player of the Week for his performance.[26] He was also named the Lott IMPACT Player of the Week.[27][28]

Peterson had two punt returns against Vanderbilt for eight yards in week two as the Tigers rolled past the Commodores. He also returned two kickoffs for 51 yards, to go along with one tackle.[29][30]

In week three of the 2010 season, the 2–0 Tigers hosted 1–1 Mississippi State for LSU's first home game of the year. The Tiger defense suffocated Mississippi State's offense and Peterson strengthened his campaign with two acrobatic interceptions for LSU. He also returned one kickoff 39 yards and one punt 2 yards to go along with four solo tackles.[29][31]

Peterson entertained the home crowd again in week four against Top-25 foe West Virginia. With the game tied 0–0 early in the first quarter, West Virginia went to attempt a mid-range field goal and Peterson was able to leap from behind the line of scrimmage and block the kick. The Tiger defense forced West Virginia to punt later in the half. Peterson fielded the punt on his own 40-yard line and raced 60-yards up the middle of the field for a touchdown and a 17–0 LSU lead. Peterson struck the Heisman pose in the North end zone of Tiger Stadium, drawing a 15-yard unsportsmanlike conduct penalty. Peterson was almost single-handedly responsible for 10 points in the game that ended with LSU winning 20–14. The national sports media began comparing Peterson to Woodson, who actually had worse statistics than Peterson through his first four games during his Heisman winning season.[32] Peterson was again named SEC Special Teams Player of the Week.[33] He also recorded 1 solo tackle.[29][34]

Week five saw the LSU Tigers take on the Tennessee Volunteers. Peterson and the LSU defense limited Tennessee to 217 yards of offense and the Tigers won 16–14.[35] Peterson recorded 1 solo tackle and 3 assisted tackles. He had 3 punt returns for 30 yards and 3 kickoff returns for 64 yards. The LSU Tigers improved to 5–0 and 3–0 in the SEC with the victory over the Volunteers.[36]

Peterson's efforts helped the Tigers to a No. 12 ranking in the Associated Press Top 25 as well as a #9 ranking in the USA Today Coaches Poll Top 25.[37] Through week 5 of the 2010 season, he was 3rd in Division 1-A in punt return average at 23.6 yards per attempt (12 for 283), 1st in punt return touchdowns with 2, and 22nd in kickoff return average at 28.2 yards per attempt. Peterson was also tied for 30th in the country with two interceptions.[38] He was in the top five of most straw polls regarding the 2010 Heisman Trophy.[39] In an effort to jumpstart the struggling offense for the Tigers, Peterson practiced as a wide receiver and a running back on offense.

On October 9, against the Florida Gators, Peterson had four kick returns for 106 net yards, one punt return, and one total tackle in the 33–29 victory.[40] In the next game, against the McNeese State Cowboys, he had two kick returns for 63 net yards and two punt returns for 34 net yards, to go along with one tackle.[41] In the following game, against Auburn, he had four kick returns for 99 net yards, two punt returns for 18 net yards, and three total tackles.[42] On November 6, against Alabama, he had two kick returns for 45 net yards, two punt returns for 22 net yards, eight total tackles, and three passes defended in the 24–21 victory.[43] The next week, against Louisiana–Monroe, he had three punt returns for 31 net yards, one total tackle, and an interception that was returned 85 yards.[44] In the following game, against Ole Miss, he had four kick returns for 121 net yards, three punt returns for 30 net yards, four total tackles, and one interception.[45] On November 27, against Arkansas, he had four kick returns for 163 net yards, three total tackles, and one pass defensed.[46] In his final collegiate game, the Cotton Bowl against Texas A&M, he had three kick returns for 81 net yards to go along with six total tackles.[47]

Following the season, he was a first-team All-SEC selection, and was recognized as a unanimous first-team All-American.[48]

Collegiate statistics

Patrick Peterson Tackles Interceptions Fumbles
Year School Conf Class Pos G Solo Ast Tot Loss Sk Int Yds Avg TD PD FR Yds TD FF
2008 LSU SEC FR DB 13 32 9 41 1.5 0.0 1 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2009 LSU SEC SO DB 13 43 9 52 0.0 0.0 2 37 18.5 1 0 0 0 1 0
2010 LSU SEC JR DB 13 29 13 42 1.5 0.0 4 134 33.5 0 0 0 0 0 0
Career LSU 39 104 31 135 3.0 0.0 7 171 24.4 1 0 0 0 1 0

Professional career

Coming out of LSU in 2011, Peterson was a projected first round pick by NFL draft experts and scouts. He was a consensus top five pick and was thought to be the best player in the draft by multiple analysts.[49] Peterson attended the NFL combine and completed all of the required combine drills. On March 14, 2011, he participated at LSU's pro day and opted to stand on his combine numbers and only perform positional drills for scouts and team representatives. Pittsburgh Steelers' head coach Mike Tomlin, Carolina Panthers' head coach Ron Rivera, and New Orleans Saints' head coach Sean Payton were among the team representatives that attended LSU's pro day to scout Peterson, Kelvin Sheppard, Drake Nevis, Joseph Barksdale, Stevan Ridley, Lazarius Levingston, Terrence Toliver, and multiple others.[50] He was ranked the top cornerback prospect in the draft by NFL analyst Mike Mayock, NFLDraftScout.com, Foxsports analyst Brian Billick, and Sports Illustrated.[51][52][53]

Pre-draft measurables
Ht Wt Arm length Hand size 40-yard dash 10-yd split 20-yd split 20-ss 3-cone Vert jump Broad BP
6 ft 0 14 in
(1.84 m)
219 lb
(99 kg)
32 in
(0.81 m)
9 14 in
(0.23 m)
4.34 s 1.49 s 2.44 s 4.07 s 6.58 s 38 in
(0.97 m)
10 ft 6 in
(3.20 m)
15 reps
All values from NFL Combine [54]

The Arizona Cardinals selected Peterson in the first round (fifth overall) of the 2011 NFL Draft. He was the first cornerback selected.[55]

2011

On July 30, 2011, the Arizona Cardinals signed Peterson to a fully guaranteed four-year, $18.42 million contract that included a signing bonus of $11.90 million.[56][57]

On August 27, 2011, Peterson intercepted a pass from Philip Rivers and returned it for a touchdown on his first play in a preseason game against the San Diego Chargers.[58]

Head coach Ken Whisenhunt named Peterson the starting cornerback, alongside Greg Toler, to begin his rookie season. He started the Arizona Cardinals' season-opener against the Carolina Panthers and scored his first career touchdown after returning a punt for an 89-yards in the fourth quarter to win the game 28-21. Peterson also recorded five solo tackles during the game.[59] The following week, he recorded a season-high eight combined tackles as the Cardinals lost 21-22 to the Washington Redskins.[60] On September 25, 2011, Peterson made one tackle, defended a pass, and made his first career interception, picking off a pass from Seattle Seahawks' quarterback Tarvaris Jackson during a 10-13 loss.[61][62]

On November 6, 2011, during the overtime period, Peterson fielded a punt at the one-yard line, evaded several would-be tacklers, and returned it for the 99-yard touchdown in a 19-13 victory over the St. Louis Rams. He also intercepted a flea-flicker pass from Sam Bradford intended for Brandon Lloyd and recorded three tackles and three pass deflections.[63] He earned his first NFC Special Teams Player of the Week nomination.[64] In Week 14, he led the Cardinals with five solo tackles and made the first sack of his career on San Francisco 49ers' quarterback Alex Smith during 21-19 victory for the Cardinals.[65][66]

He tied the single-season record for punt return touchdowns with his fourth, accomplishing the feat against the St. Louis Rams on November 27.[67][68] He became the only player in NFL history with four punt-return touchdowns of at least 80 yards in a single season. He earned NFC Special Teams Player of the Week for the second time for his performance against the Rams.[69] He finished his rookie season with a sack, 64 combined tackles (59 solo), two interceptions, 13 passes defended, and two fumble recoveries in 16 games and 16 starts. He also produced a rookie record 699 return yards for four touchdowns on 44 punt returns.[70]

Peterson was selected as a kick returner to the 2012 Pro Bowl and was the only rookie to be selected to the 2011 All-Pro First Team.[71][72] He was ranked #55 by his fellow players on the NFL Top 100 Players of 2012.[73]

2012

Peterson returned as the starting cornerback, opposite William Gay, to begin the 2012 season. On September 16, 2012, Peterson had one carry for 17-yards, three combined tackles, a pass deflection, and intercepted Tom Brady in a 20-18 victory over the New England Patriots.[74] On December 16, 2012, he recorded a season-high seven combined tackles and intercepted Detroit Lions' quarterback Matt Stafford in a 38-10 victory.[75] The interception marked his seventh of the season.[76]

Peterson started all 16 games making 55 tackles with seven interceptions, 17 passes defended, and a NFL-leading five fumble recoveries. He also had 51 punt returns producing 426 return yards, three receptions for 11 receiving yards, and two carries for 13 rushing yards.[77] On December 26, 2012, it was announced that Peterson was voted to the 2013 Pro Bowl as a cornerback.[78] He was ranked #33 by his fellow players on the NFL Top 100 Players of 2013.[79]

2013

The Arizona Cardinals' new head coach Bruce Arians named Peterson the starting cornerback, opposite Jerraud Powers, to begin the 2013 season.[80]

On September 15, 2013, Peterson caught one pass for 17-yards, threw a 17-yard pass to Kerry Taylor, and recorded four solo tackles during a 25-21 win against the Detroit Lions.[81] This made him the first defender to catch and complete a pass in the same game since the 1970 merger. On September 29, he recorded two solo tackles and intercepted two passes from Tampa Bay Buccaneers' quarterback Mike Glennon during a 13-10 victory.[82][83] It was the first game of Peterson's career with multiple interceptions. He earned NFC Defensive Player of the Week honors for his game against Tampa Bay.[84] In Week 14, Peterson collected a season-high seven combined tackles in a 37-34 victory over the Tennessee Titans.[85] Although the Cardinals finished with a 10-6 record in their first year under Bruce Arians, they finished third in their division and did not qualify for a playoff berth.[86]

Peterson started all 16 games in 2013 and made 42 combined tackles (40 solo), three interceptions, 13 pass deflections, and two fumble recoveries. He also returned 33 punts for 198 return yards, had one kickoff return attempt for 18-yards, made six catches for 54 receiving yards, and had four carries for 21-yards.[87] He was selected for the 2014 Pro Bowl as a cornerback, marking the third of his career.[88] He was named a First Team All-Pro for the second time in his career.[89] He was ranked #22 by his fellow players on the NFL Top 100 Players of 2014.[90]

Patrick Peterson
Peterson in the 2014 season.

2014

On July 29, 2014, the Arizona Cardinals signed Peterson to a five-year, $70 million contract extension with $48 million guaranteed and a $15.3 million signing bonus.[91]

He began the season as the Arizona Cardinals' starting cornerback, opposite Antonio Cromartie, and no longer had to handle return duties due to the arrival of Ted Ginn Jr. On November 9, 2014, he made two solo tackles and intercepted two passes from St. Louis Rams' quarterback Austin Davis during a 31-14 victory. He returned one interception for a 30-yard touchdown, marking the first defensive touchdown of his career.[92][93] He earned NFC Defensive Player of the Week for his performance against the Rams.[94] On December 7, Peterson recorded a season-high eight combined tackles and sacked Kansas City Chiefs' quarterback Alex Smith in a 17-14 victory.[95] He finished the 2014 season with 50 combined tackles (43 solo), eight pass deflections, three interceptions, a forced fumble, and three fumble recoveries in 16 games and 16 [96]starts.[97] He was selected to the 2015 Pro Bowl as a cornerback, marking his fourth straight appearance.[98]

The Arizona Cardinals finished with an 11-5 record in 2014 and qualified for a playoff berth.[99][100] On January 3, 2015, Peterson played in his first career postseason game and recorded two combined tackles during a 16-27 loss to the Carolina Panthers in the NFC Wild Card Round.[101]

Shortly after the 2014 NFL season, Peterson announced that he had been diagnosed with diabetes. He stated that this affected his performance in the 2014 season, that he had the disease under control, and was ready for the 2015 season.[102] He was ranked #19 by his fellow players on the NFL Top 100 Players of 2015.[103]

2015

Peterson was named the starting cornerback and had full-time punt return duties after the departure of Ted Ginn Jr.[104]

On September 20, 2015, he recorded three solo tackles and intercepted Jay Cutler during a 48-23 win over the Chicago Bears.[105] In Week 5, he collected four combined tackles and intercepted a pass off Matthew Stafford, as the Arizona Cardinals defeated the Detroit Lions 42-17.[106] The following game, he earned a season-high five solo tackles as the Cardinals were defeated by the Pittsburgh Steelers 13-25.[107] Although he started all 16 games, Peterson finished with a career low 35 combined tackles (35 solo), eight pass deflections, and made two interceptions.[108]

The Arizona Cardinals finished first in the NFC West with a 13-3 record, receiving a playoff berth, home field advantage, and a first round bye week.[109] After defeating the Green Bay Packers 26-20 in the Divisional Round, the Cardinals went on the face the Carolina Panthers in the NFC Championship.[110] Peterson recorded five combined tackles and returned an interception off Cam Newton for 70 yards, as the Cardinals lost 49–15.[111]

He was selected to the 2016 Pro Bowl as a cornerback, marking his fifth straight, and was voted first-team All-Pro for the third time.[112][113] He was also ranked 18th best player by his fellow NFL players on the NFL Top 100 Players of 2016.[114]

2016

Peterson began the season as the starting cornerback, opposite Marcus Cooper, with full-time punt return duties being taken over by John Brown with Peterson returning sparingly throughout the season.

On September 18, 2016, Peterson recorded four combined tackles and intercepted Jameis Winston during a 40-7 victory over the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.[115] In Week 3, Peterson recorded four combined tackles and intercepted Tyrod Taylor, catching the ball with one hand during an 18-33 loss to the Buffalo Bills.[116][117] On December 24, 2016, he collected a season-high six combined tackles in a 34-31 victory over the Seattle Seahawks.[118] He recorded 51 combined tackles (45 solo), six passes deflected, and three interceptions in 16 games and 16 starts.[119] On December 20, 2016, for the sixth consecutive year, Peterson was selected to be in the 2017 Pro Bowl, along with teammates Larry Fitzgerald and David Johnson.[120] He was also ranked 19th by his peers on the NFL Top 100 Players of 2017 as the highest ranked cornerback.[121]

2017

Peterson remained as the Cardinals' de facto starting cornerback with Justin Bethel after Marcus Cooper departed in free agency. In a Week 11 game against the Houston Texans, Peterson got his first Interception of the season, a one handed grab off Tom Savage.[122][123] On December 19, 2017, Peterson was named to his seventh straight Pro Bowl.[124] Overall, he finished the 2017 season with 13 punt returns for 88 net yards, 34 total tackles, one fumble recovery, eight passes defensed, and one interception.[125] He was ranked 23rd by his fellow players on the NFL Top 100 Players of 2018.[126]

2018

In Week 1 against the Washington Redskins, Peterson had one tackle and a sack on quarterback Alex Smith.[127] In Week 2 against the Los Angeles Rams, Peterson made eight tackles and intercepted quarterback Jared Goff.[128] In Week 7 against the Denver Broncos, Peterson made six tackles and intercepted quarterback Case Keenum.[129] He finished the season with 54 tackles, five pass deflections, and two interceptions, on his way to his eighth straight Pro Bowl.[130][131]

2019

On May 16, 2019, the NFL announced that Peterson will be suspended for the first six games of the season for a violation of the leagues performance enhancing drugs policy. He filed an appeal to have the suspension reduced, but he did not win the appeal and the six game suspension was upheld.[132]

Career NFL statistics

Career statistics Tackles Interceptions Other
Season Team Games Solo Ast Total Sack Int Yds IntTD DefTD FFum FRec PD Safety
2011 ARI 16 59 5 64 1.0 2 1 0 0 0 2 13 0
2012 ARI 16 52 3 55 0.0 7 64 0 0 0 5 16 0
2013 ARI 16 40 2 42 0.0 3 59 0 0 0 2 13 0
2014 ARI 16 43 7 50 1.0 3 30 1 0 0 0 7 0
2015 ARI 16 35 0 35 0.0 2 41 0 0 1 0 8 0
2016 ARI 16 45 6 51 0.0 3 27 0 0 0 1 6 0
2017 ARI 16 30 4 34 0.0 1 22 0 0 0 1 8 0
2018 ARI 16 45 9 54 1.0 2 0 0 0 0 0 5 0
Career 128 349 36 385 3.0 23 244 1 0 1 11 76 0

Source:[133]

NFL records

Cardinals franchise records

  • Longest punt return touchdown: 99 (2011)[134]
  • Most punt return touchdowns in a single season: 4 (2011)[134]
  • Most punt return yards in a single season: 699 (2011)[134]

Personal life

Peterson went by the last name "Johnson" when he signed with LSU, but formally changed it to "Peterson" in August 2008. His parents are Patrick and Shandra Peterson of Fort Lauderdale, FL. He is a relative of NFL players Bryant McFadden, Walter McFadden, Sinorice Moss and Santana Moss (his maternal cousins).[135] Peterson's younger brother, Avery Johnson (who has also changed his last name to "Peterson"), was a member of the ESPNU 150 Watch List in 2012.[136] He has been married since 2012 to Antonique Peterson, D.O., a family practice physician in Phoenix.[137]

On April 7, 2015, Peterson revealed he has type two diabetes.[102]

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External links

2010 All-SEC football team

The 2010 All-SEC football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Southeastern Conference (SEC) chosen by the Associated Press (AP) and the conference coaches for the 2010 Southeastern Conference football season.

The Auburn Tigers won the conference, beating the South Carolina Gamecocks 56 to 17 in the SEC Championship game. The Tigers then won a national championship, defeating the Pac-12 champion Oregon Ducks 22 to 19 in the 2011 BCS National Championship Game. Auburn led the conference with four consensus first-team All-SEC selections by both the AP and the coaches; LSU was second with three.

Auburn quarterback Cam Newton, a unanimous AP selection, won the Heisman Trophy and was voted AP SEC Offensive Player of the Year. Auburn defensive tackle Nick Fairley, also a unanimous AP selection, won the Lombardi Award and was voted AP SEC Defensive Player of the Year. LSU cornerback Patrick Peterson won the Bednarik Award.

2010 College Football All-America Team

The College Football All-America Team is an honor given annually to the best players of American college football at their respective positions. The original All-America team was the 1889 College Football All-America Team selected by Caspar Whitney and Walter Camp. In 1950, the National Collegiate Athletic Bureau, which is the National Collegiate Athletic Association's (NCAA) service bureau, compiled the first list of All-Americans including first-team selections on teams created for a national audience that received national circulation with the intent of recognizing selections made from viewpoints that were nationwide. Since 1952, College Sports Information Directors of America (CoSIDA) has bestowed Academic All-American recognition on male and female athletes in Divisions I, II, and III of the NCAA as well as National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics athletes, covering all NCAA championship sports.The 2010 College Football All-America Team is composed of the following first teams: Associated Press (AP), Football Writers Association of America (FWAA), American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), Walter Camp Foundation (WCFF), The Sporting News (TSN), Sports Illustrated (SI), Pro Football Weekly (PFW), ESPN, CBS Sports (CBS), College Football News (CFN), Rivals.com, and Scout.com.

Currently, NCAA compiles consensus all-America teams in the sports of Division I-FBS football and Division I men’s basketball using a point system computed from All-America teams named by coaches associations or media sources. The system consists of three points for first team, two points for second team and one point for third team. Honorable mention and fourth team or lower recognitions are not accorded any points. Football consensus teams are compiled by position and the player accumulating the most points at each position is named first team consensus all-American. Currently, the NCAA recognizes All-Americans selected by the AP, AFCA, FWAA, TSN, and the WCFF to determine Consensus All-Americans.In 2010, there were 10 unanimous All-Americans.

2010 LSU Tigers football team

The 2010 LSU Tigers football team represented Louisiana State University in the 2010 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Tigers were led by head coach Les Miles in his 6th season. They played their home games at Tiger Stadium and were members of the Southeastern Conference in the Western Division. They finished the season 11–2, 6–2 in SEC play and were invited to the Cotton Bowl Classic where they defeated Texas A&M 41–24.

2010 Southeastern Conference football season

The 2010 Southeastern Conference football season began on Thursday, September 2, 2010 with South Carolina defeating Southern Miss on ESPN.

2011 All-Pro Team

There are three 2011 All-Pro Teams—one each named by the Associated Press (AP), Pro Football Writers Association (PFWA), and Sporting News—for performance in the 2011 NFL season. While none of these have the official imprimatur of the NFL (whose official recognition is nomination to the 2012 Pro Bowl), they are included (separately) in the NFL Record and Fact Book. Any player selected to any of the teams can be described as an "All-Pro."

The AP team, with first- and second-team selections, was chosen by a national panel of 50 NFL writers; the Sporting News selection process uses a panel of 50 NFL coaches and executives, while the PFWA team is chosen by polling its 300+ members.

2011 Arizona Cardinals season

The 2011 Arizona Cardinals season was the franchise's 92nd season in the National Football League and the 24th season in Arizona. For Ken Whisenhunt, it was his fifth season as the head coach of the Cardinals. This was going to be the Cardinals first season with new starting quarterback Kevin Kolb, but he was injured &replaced by John Skelton. The team improved on their 5–11 record from the 2010 season, but missed the playoffs for a second consecutive season.

The 2011 Cardinals won four overtime games, an NFL record.

2011 NFL season

The 2011 NFL season was the 92nd regular season of the National Football League. It began on Thursday, September 8, 2011, with the Super Bowl XLV champion Green Bay Packers defeating the Super Bowl XLIV champion New Orleans Saints 42–34 at Lambeau Field and ended with Super Bowl XLVI, the league's championship game, on February 5, 2012, at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis where the New York Giants defeated the New England Patriots 21–17.

Due to a labor dispute between league owners and players, a lockout began on March 11 and ended on July 25, lasting 18 weeks and 4 days (130 days). Although it initially threatened to postpone or cancel the season, the only game that was canceled was the August 7 Pro Football Hall of Fame Game.

The 2011 season saw an unprecedented amount of passing offense: Three of the nine highest passing yardage totals of all time were established: No. 2 Drew Brees (5,476), No. 3 Tom Brady (5,235), and No. 9 Matthew Stafford (5,038); Eli Manning threw for 4,933 yards, which places him 14th all time. It also saw Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers establish the all-time single-season best QB Rating of 122.5. Further cementing the modern NFL's reputation as a "passing league" was the fact that, for the second consecutive year, the league overall set a record for most average passing yards per team per game, with 229.7, breaking 2010's record by more than eight yards per game. (For comparison, the league-wide average rushing yards total finished the 2011 season at 57th all-time.)

A subplot of the 2011 season was determining who would have the worst record, and therefore "earn" the right to the No. 1 overall pick in the 2012 draft. Stanford senior quarterback Andrew Luck was seen as the best quarterback prospect in years. Fans of some teams that started the season with numerous losses (notably Indianapolis) were openly rooting for their teams to "Suck for Luck."

2018 All-Pro Team

The 2018 All-Pro teams were named by the Associated Press (AP), Pro Football Writers of America (PFWA), and Sporting News (SN) for performance in the 2018 NFL season. While none of the All-Pro teams have the official imprimatur of the NFL (whose official recognition is nomination to the 2019 Pro Bowl), they are included in the NFL Record and Fact Book and also part of the language of the 2011 NFLPA Collective Bargaining Agreement. Any player selected to the first-team of any of the teams can be described as an "All-Pro." The AP team, with first-team and second-team selections, was chosen by a national panel of fifty NFL writers and broadcasters. The Sporting News All-NFL team is voted on by NFL players and executives and will be released at a later date. The PFWA team is selected by its more than 300 national members who are accredited media members covering the NFL.

Brandon Williams (cornerback, born 1992)

Brandon Williams (born September 9, 1992) is an American football cornerback for the Arizona Cardinals of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Texas A&M.

Chuck Bednarik Award

The Chuck Bednarik Award is presented annually to the defensive player in college football as judged by the Maxwell Football Club to be the best in the United States. The award is named for Chuck Bednarik, a former college and professional American football player. Voters for the Maxwell College Awards are NCAA head college football coaches, members of the Maxwell Football Club, and sportswriters and sportscasters from across the country. The Maxwell Club is located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and the presentations are held in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Club members are given voting privileges for the award.

Devin White

Devin White (born February 17, 1998) is an American football linebacker for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at LSU, and was drafted by the Buccaneers in the first round of the 2019 NFL Draft.

Gloversville, New York

Gloversville, a city in Fulton County, New York, was once the hub of the United States' glovemaking industry, with over two hundred manufacturers in Gloversville and the adjacent city of Johnstown. In 2010, Gloversville had a population of 15,665.

Jim Thorpe Award

The Jim Thorpe Award, named in memory of multi-sport athlete Jim Thorpe, has been awarded to the top defensive back in college football since 1986. It is voted on by the Oklahoma Sports Hall of Fame. In 2017, the award became sponsorsed by Paycom and was named the Paycom Jim Thorpe Award.

Justin Bethel

Justin Andrew Bethel (born June 17, 1990) is an American football cornerback and special teamer for the Baltimore Ravens of the National Football League (NFL). He was drafted by the Arizona Cardinals in the sixth round of the 2012 NFL Draft. He played college football at Presbyterian College.

List of LSU Tigers football All-Americans

A College Football All-America Team is selected annually by various organizations to recognize each season's most outstanding players at each position. Certain organizations are recognized by the NCAA as "official" selectors, whose teams are used to determine consensus and unanimous All-Americans. The LSU Tigers football team has had 34 players recognized as consensus All-Americans, with nine of those being unanimous selections. Gaynell Tinsley was LSU's first consensus (1935) and unanimous (1936) All-American. Four LSU players have been recognized as consensus All-Americans twice: Tinsley, Billy Cannon, Tommy Casanova, and Charles Alexander. Cannon is the only LSU player to be unanimously selected twice, doing so in 1958 and 1959. Casanova is widely considered LSU's only three-time All-American; he was named a first-team All-American by at least one selector in 1969, 1970, and 1971.

List of LSU Tigers football recruiting history

History of LSU Tigers football recruiting rankings - Rivals.com (Yahoo! Sports), Scouts Inc. (ESPN), 247Sports.com (CBS Sports), Scout.com (Scout Media)

Patrick Johnson

Patrick Johnson may refer to:

Patrick Johnson (wide receiver) (born 1976), former NFL football player

Patrick Johnson (sprinter) (born 1972), Australian sprinter

Patrick Read Johnson (born 1952), American filmmaker, special effects artist and screenwriter

Patrick Johnson (actor) (born 1993), American actor

E. Patrick Johnson (born 1967), African American performance artist, ethnographer, and scholar

Patrick Peterson (born 1990), American football player, formerly known as Patrick Johnson

Togger Johnson (Patrick Johnson), a character in the children's TV series Grange Hill

Patrick Peterson (runner)

Patrick Peterson is an American middle-distance runner who runs professionally for Atlanta Track Club and Mizuno. He ran collegiately for the Iowa State Cyclones, where he placed 3rd at the 2015 Big 12 Outdoor Track and Field Championships in the 800 meter. He was a member of Iowa State's third place distance medley relay team at the 2015 NCAA Division I Indoor Track and Field Championships, earning First-Team All-America honors and running an 800 m split of 1:46.52, the fastest in the race.

Tyrann Mathieu

Tyrann Devine Mathieu (; born May 13, 1992) is an American football safety for the Kansas City Chiefs of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for Louisiana State University (LSU). In college he developed a reputation for causing turnovers, setting a Southeastern Conference (SEC) record with 11 career forced fumbles and earning the nickname "Honey Badger". In his sophomore season, he was recognized as a consensus All-American, won the Chuck Bednarik Award as the best defensive player in college football, and was a finalist for the Heisman Trophy. Mathieu was dismissed from the LSU football program after that season due to a violation of team rules.

After spending a year out of football in 2012, he was drafted by the Arizona Cardinals in the third round of the 2013 NFL Draft, reuniting him in the defensive backfield with former college teammate Patrick Peterson. As a rookie he was named to the PFWA All-Rookie Team. In 2015, he was invited to the Pro Bowl and earned first-team All-Pro honors. He has also played for the Houston Texans.

Arizona Cardinals current roster
Active roster
Patrick Peterson

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