Patrick Hine

Air Chief Marshal Sir Patrick Bardon Hine, GCB, GBE is a former senior Royal Air Force commander. Most notably, he was joint commander of all British forces during the Gulf War.

Sir Patrick Hine
Nickname(s)Paddy
BornSouthampton, England
AllegianceUnited Kingdom
Service/branchRoyal Air Force
Years of service1953–91
RankAir Chief Marshal
Commands heldJoint Commander British Forces Gulf War (1991)
Strike Command (1988–91)
Air Member for Supply and Organisation (1987–88)
Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff (1985–87)
RAF Germany (1983–85)
Battles/warsFalklands War
Gulf War
AwardsKnight Grand Cross of the Order of the Bath
Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the British Empire
Queen's Commendation for Valuable Service in the Air

RAF career

Hine was born near Southampton, and was educated at Peter Symonds School in Winchester.[1] He entered the RAF on a National Service commission as an acting pilot officer on probation on 22 March 1951,[2] and was regraded as a pilot officer on 6 February 1952. He was commissioned as a pilot officer on 14 October 1952 (seniority from 6 February 1952),[3] and promoted to flying officer on 20 March 1953.[4] He was appointed to a permanent commission in the RAF on 1 October 1953, in the rank of flying officer.[5]

As a junior officer, Hine flew the Gloster Meteor and then the Hawker Hunter.[1] He was promoted to flight lieutenant on 20 September 1956.[6] From 1957 to 1959 he performed on the Black Arrows, then the RAF’s aerobatics display team.[1] He was awarded the Queen's Commendation for Valuable Service in the Air in the 1960 Birthday Honours List.[7] He was promoted to squadron leader on 1 July 1962[8] and appointed Officer Commanding No. 92 Squadron.[1] On 1 January 1968, he was promoted to wing commander,[9] and was promoted to group captain on 1 January 1972.[10]

On 1 July 1975, he was promoted to air commodore[11] and was appointed Director of Public Relations for the RAF.[1] He was made Senior Air Staff Officer at HQ RAF Germany in 1979. He was promoted to air vice-marshal on 1 January 1980[12] and was appointed Assistant Chief of the Air Staff (Policy) at the Ministry of Defence the next year.[1] He became Commander of the Second Tactical Air Force and Commander-in-Chief of RAF Germany in 1983.[1] Promoted to acting air marshal by June 1983, he was knighted with a Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath in the 1983 Birthday Honours List.[13]

Promoted to air chief marshal on 1 July 1985,[14] he became Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff that year.[1] In late 1987 he was appointed Air Member for Supply and Organisation.[15]

Hine was appointed Air Officer Commanding-in-Chief Strike Command in 1988.[16] He was promoted to a Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the Bath in the 1989 New Year Honours List.[17]

He was Joint Commander of all British forces during the Gulf War. He was appointed a Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the British Empire in the 1991 Birthday Honours List.[18]

Hine retired from the RAF in 1991 and subsequently became a military advisor to British Aerospace from which he retired in April 1999.[1] Two years earlier, in 1997, Hine was made the King of Arms of the Order of the British Empire, making him the herald to the Order of the British Empire.

He became a member of The Royal and Ancient Golf Club in 1995 and in May 2010 he was nominated to be the Captain of the R&A for the year 2010–11.[19] His home course is Brokenhurst Manor Golf Club in Hampshire, where he is the Club President. Hine also had a prolific amateur golfing career and won the Carris Trophy (England U18 Stroke Play Championship) and the Brabazon Trophy (England Amateur Stoke Play Champion) in 1949; he remains the only person to do this. He also won the Hampshire County Championship in that year. He represented England Boys in 1948 and 1949.

Family

He is married to Jill; they have three sons.[1]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Air University biography
  2. ^ London Gazette, 11 May 1951
  3. ^ London Gazette, 13 January 1953
  4. ^ London Gazette, 24 March 1953
  5. ^ London Gazette, 5 January 1954
  6. ^ London Gazette, 2 October 1956
  7. ^ London Gazette, 11 June 1960
  8. ^ London Gazette, 3 July 1962
  9. ^ London Gazette, 2 January 1968
  10. ^ London Gazette, 4 January 1972
  11. ^ London Gazette, 1 July 1975
  12. ^ London Gazette, 19 February 1980
  13. ^ London Gazette, 11 June 1983
  14. ^ London Gazette, 16 July 1985
  15. ^ "No. 51136". The London Gazette (Supplement). 30 November 1987. p. 14779.
  16. ^ "No. 51460". The London Gazette (Supplement). 5 September 1988. p. 10056.
  17. ^ London Gazette, 31 December 1988
  18. ^ "No. 52588". The London Gazette (Supplement). 28 June 1991. p. 26.
  19. ^ Sir Patrick Hine is new R&A Captain European Tour, 6 May 2010
Military offices
Preceded by
Sir Thomas Kennedy
Commander-in-Chief RAF Germany
Also Commander of the Second Tactical Air Force

1983–1985
Succeeded by
Sir David Parry-Evans
Preceded by
Sir Peter Harding
Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff
1985–1987
Succeeded by
Sir Richard Vincent
Preceded by
Sir Michael Armitage
Air Member for Supply and Organisation
1987–1988
Succeeded by
Sir Brendan Jackson
Preceded by
Sir Peter Harding
Commander-in-Chief Strike Command
1988–1991
Succeeded by
Sir Michael Graydon
Heraldic offices
Preceded by
Sir Anthony Morton
King of Arms of the Order of the British Empire
1997–2011
Succeeded by
Sir Peter Abbott
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Established in 1925 with summer camps which would last from May until September each year, it was used by both the Royal Air Force and United States Army Air Forces. During the war it was used primarily as an army co-operation airfield but several squadrons were based there with a variety of aircraft. Spitfires, Hurricanes and Mosquito's. Briefly - the early Meteor jets were based before flying off to RAF CULMHEAD in East Devon. There after they were based at RAF MANSTON with the mission of shooting down the V1 rockets. After being stood down in 1947 it was recommissioned in 1952 as a Meteor jet training base as a result of the Korean War. It was home to 209 AFS where Lord Craig and Sir Patrick Hine were based before going to become Air Chief Marshals of the RAF.

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