Pat Patriot

Pat Patriot, commonly referred to as "Pat The Patriot," is the mascot of the New England Patriots, a National Football League (NFL) franchise based in Foxborough, Massachusetts. He is depicted as a soldier of the American Revolution. The logo version of Pat wears a tricorne hat and a Continental Army uniform. This was the Patriots' official insignia until 1993, when it was replaced by the current logo which is known as "Flying Elvis". Logo Pat was created by Worcester Telegram - Evening Gazette cartoonist Phil Bissell in 1960.[1][2]

New England Patriots logo old
"Pat Patriot" logo used by the New England Patriots as their primary logo from 1960 (when the team was known as the Boston Patriots) through 1992. This logo is commonly referred to as "Pat The Patriot" and had been resurrected for the Patriots' white-helmeted throwback uniforms until the NFL's current "one helmet shell" rule which forbids teams from wearing more than one color helmet during the course of a season. However, Pat The Patriot can still be seen on the Patriots' sideline, appearing on official team-issued clothing worn by players such as quarterback Tom Brady's knit winter hat.

1979 new logo consideration

PatPatriot
Live mascot Pat Patriot running onto the field at a New England Patriots practice.

In 1979 the Patriots considered replacing Pat Patriot with a new logo, mainly because Pat Patriot was very detailed and was therefore difficult to replicate accurately on various promotional materials and merchandise. Unsure if this would be a good decision for the team, executives decided to let the fans vote for the logo they preferred during halftime of a Patriots' home game. Pat Patriot was the overwhelming victor.[3]

Live mascot development

The live mascot Pat was originally developed in the early 1990s and made one of his first public appearances at the 1995 Pro Bowl[4] as a Team NFL Hero. Team NFL Heroes were a line of mascot-like characters developed by NFL Properties; most of the characters only lasted a season or two but a handful ended up being adopted as official mascots by their respective teams, either immediately after the Team NFL Heroes project was canceled or years later with Pat being an example of the former. The live mascot Pat we know of today was intended at first to be a completely different character from the Pat Patriot logo; this is supported by the fact that Pat's name was listed as "Revere" (a reference to Paul Revere) on Team NFL Heroes merchandise.

Live mascot character design

Live mascot Pat wears either the Patriots' home uniform which consists of the navy blue jersey, number 1, with silver pants or the away uniform which consists of the white jersey, number 1, with navy blue pants. Which uniform Pat wears depends on which uniform the team wears in the game he is appearing at. Pat previously wore jersey number 0 until a fan approached team owner Robert Kraft and asked if the number could be changed. This interaction was caught on tape by NFL Films and shown on television.

Super Bowl appearances

Pat has represented the Patriots as the team's live mascot in ten of the eleven Super Bowls the team has appeared in: XXXI, XXXVI, XXXVIII, XXXIX, XLII, XLVI, XLIX, LI, LII and LIII.

Live mascot performer

From 2009 to 2019 the person inside the live mascot Pat costume was Adam Visbaras.[5]

References

  1. ^ Palma, Briana (January 16, 2015). "Pat Everlasting". New England Patriots. Retrieved February 19, 2015.
  2. ^ Caputo, Paul (January 23, 2016). "Now to Make Some History: The Story Behind Pat Patriot". SportsLogos.net. Retrieved February 19, 2018.
  3. ^ Lukas, Paul (July 28, 2011). "The untold story behind the Patriots logo". ESPN. Retrieved February 19, 2018.
  4. ^ Gaines, Cork (September 10, 2017). "In 1995 the NFL used some bizarre mascots that were never seen again". Business Insider. Retrieved February 19, 2018.
  5. ^ Bagni, Adam (January 27, 2017). "Only on 10: Patriots mascot reveals identity". WBTS-LD. Retrieved February 19, 2018.

External links

1994 New England Patriots season

The 1994 New England Patriots season was the team's 35th season, and 25th in the National Football League. It was the first under owner Robert Kraft, who purchased the team after preventing previous owner James Orthwein from moving the Patriots to St. Louis. The Patriots finished the season with a record of ten wins and six losses, and finished tied for first in the AFC's Eastern division.

The Patriots began the 1994 season with a 3–6 record before winning their final seven games, finishing 10–6 and qualifying the playoffs. The Patriots were just two seasons removed from a 2-win season, and made the playoffs for the first time since 1986 and only the seventh time in the team's history. It was also their first winning season since 1988. The winning streak started with a 26–20 overtime win over the Minnesota Vikings.

Frank Borth

Frank M. Borth III (April 1, 1918 – August 9, 2009) was an American comic book artist.

Gil Santos

Gilbert A. Santos (April 19, 1938 – April 19, 2018) was an American radio play-by-play announcer for the New England Patriots of the National Football League, and morning sports reporter for WBZ radio in Boston. He was an inductee of the Massachusetts Broadcasters Hall of Fame.He retired from WBZ radio in January 2009, and was inducted into the WBZ Radio Hall of Fame on July 9, 2009. The Patriots 2012 season was his final season of radio play-by-play.

History of the New England Patriots

The history of the New England Patriots began when Boston business executive William "Billy" Sullivan and Sullivan Brother Printers, owned by Joseph Sullivan, were awarded the eighth and final franchise of the developing American Football League (AFL) on November 16, 1959. The following winter, locals submitted thousands of ideas for the Boston football team's official name. On February 20, 1960, Sullivan chose "Boston Patriots", with "Patriots" referring to those colonists of the Thirteen Colonies who rebelled against British control during the American Revolution and in July 1776 declared the United States of America an independent nation. "Patriots" as a nickname had been suggested by 74 fans, among them Larry Kepnes. Immediately thereafter, artist Phil Bissell developed the "Pat Patriot" logo.The Patriots' time in the AFL saw them without a regular home stadium. Nickerson Field, Harvard Stadium, Fenway Park, and Alumni Stadium, all in or near Boston, served as home fields during their time in the American Football League. Early Patriots stars included defensive tackles Jim Lee "Earthquake" Hunt and Houston Antwine; quarterback Vito "Babe" Parilli; and flanker-placekicker Gino "The Duke" Cappelletti. Hunt, Parilli and Cappelletti played every year of the existence of the AFL, with Hunt and Cappelletti spending all ten years with the Patriots. Cappelletti was the all-time leading scorer in the AFL. Later the Patriots were joined by such stars as defensive end Larry Eisenhauer, fullback Jim Nance, and middle linebacker and future Hall of Famer Nick Buoniconti. Cappelletti and Nance were AFL Most Valuable Players, Cappelletti in 1964 and Nance in 1966. Buoniconti and Antwine were later named to the American Football League All-Time Team.

The Boston Patriots defeated the Buffalo Bills in an AFL Eastern Division playoff game in 1963, and played in the 1963 AFL championship game, losing to the San Diego Chargers 51–10. Although they would not appear again in an AFL or NFL post-season game for another 13 years, in the AFL, the Patriots often challenged the dominant Bills for the Eastern Division title.When the NFL and AFL merged in 1970, the Patriots were placed in the AFC East division, where they still play today. The following year, the Patriots moved to a new stadium in Foxborough, Massachusetts, a suburb of Boston, which would serve as their home for 30 years; the team also changed their name to the New England Patriots to reflect the location change, as well as its following throughout the region as its only NFL team (though both New York City teams have substantial followings in parts of Connecticut as well). During the 1970s, the Patriots had some success, earning a berth to the playoffs in 1976—as a wild card-berth—and in 1978—as AFC East champions. They would lose both games. In 1985, they returned to the playoffs, and made it all the way to Super Bowl XX, which they lost against the Chicago Bears 46–10. Following their Super Bowl loss, they returned to the playoffs in 1986, but lost in the first round. The team would not make the playoffs again for eight more years. They changed ownership several times in that period, being purchased from the Sullivan family first by Victor Kiam in 1988, who sold the team to James Orthwein in 1992. Orthwein intended to move the team to his native St. Louis, Missouri, but sold the team two years later to current owner, local businessman Robert Kraft in 1994.Though Orthwein's period as owner was short and controversial, he did oversee major changes to the team. Former New York Giants coach Bill Parcells was hired in 1993, and the drastic changes were made the same year to the Patriots uniforms, changing their primary colors from their traditional red and white to blue and silver, and introducing a new logo. Parcells would bring the Patriots to two playoff appearances, including Super Bowl XXXI, which they lost to the Green Bay Packers by a score of 35–21. Pete Carroll, Parcells' successor, would also take the team to the playoffs twice.Bill Belichick, current head coach, was hired in 2000, and a new home field, Gillette Stadium was opened in 2002. Under Belichick, the team has won six Super Bowls, including three in four years (2001-2004), and ten years later winning three more in five years (2014-2018). They also finished the 2007 regular season with a perfect 16–0 record, becoming only the fourth team in league history to go undefeated, and the only one since the league expanded its regular season schedule to 16 games; however, they ended that season with an 18-1 record after their loss to the New York Giants in Super Bowl XLII. They also played in and lost Super Bowl XLVI and Super Bowl LII. The Patriots have made the playoffs in 16 of the 19 seasons that Belichick has been coach, missing them only in 2000 (his first season, and the only season with a losing record), 2002, and 2008.

History of the New York Jets

The history of the New York Jets American football team began in 1959 with the founding of the Titans of New York, an original member of the American Football League (AFL); they began actual play the following year. The team had little success in its early years. After playing three seasons at the Polo Grounds, the team changed its name to the New York Jets, and moved into newly built Shea Stadium in 1964. In January 1965, the Jets signed University of Alabama quarterback Joe Namath to a then-record contract. The team showed gradual improvement in the late 1960s, posting its first winning record in 1967 and winning its only American Football League championship in 1968. By winning the title, New York earned the right to play in Super Bowl III against the champions of the National Football League (NFL), the Baltimore Colts. The Jets defeated the Colts in the game; in the aftermath of the upset, the AFL was deemed a worthy partner to the NFL as the two leagues merged.

Following the merger, the Jets fell into mediocrity; Namath was dogged by injuries through much of his later career. In 1981, New York qualified for the playoffs for the first time in the post-Namath era. They reached the AFC Championship Game in 1982; they were defeated on a rain-soaked Orange Bowl field by the Miami Dolphins. Beginning with the 1984 season, the team played in New Jersey's Giants Stadium. The team started the 1986 season with a 10–1 record, but the injury-plagued Jets lost their last five regular season games and relinquished a ten-point fourth quarter lead to lose in double overtime to the Cleveland Browns in the playoffs.

In the following eleven seasons, New York had limited success, reaching the playoffs only once and enduring a string of disastrous seasons, including a 1–15 record in 1996. The following year, the Jets hired two-time Super Bowl winning coach Bill Parcells. The new coach guided the team to its most successful season since the merger in 1998; the Jets finished 12–4 and reached the AFC Championship Game, in which they fell to the Denver Broncos. The team made five playoff appearances in the 2000s, their most of any decade. In 2009 and 2010, the Jets achieved back-to-back appearances in the AFC Championship Game, losing to the Indianapolis Colts and Pittsburgh Steelers. In 2010, the team began to play in MetLife Stadium, constructed near the now-demolished Giants Stadium.

Liberty High School (Henderson, Nevada)

Liberty High School is a high school in Henderson in the U.S. state of Nevada. It is part of the Clark County School District. Before the school opened, prospective students chose the name "Liberty" and the school mascot "The Patriot" through a survey mailed to their homes. This was largely chosen due to the recent terrorist attacks. Liberty's team name is the Patriots. Liberty considers itself to be a "classical school." This is because through Liberty's curriculum, one can study Latin, as well as focus on the history and society of ancient Rome and Greece.

NFL Color Rush

The NFL Color Rush was a promotion done in conjunction with the National Football League (NFL) and Nike that promotes so-called "color vs. color" matchups with teams in matchup-specific uniforms that are primarily one solid color with alternating colored accents, primarily airing on Thursday Night Football. Despite being promoted as color vs. color, some games had one team wearing traditional white uniforms, either by choice or out of necessity. The uniforms did not count against each team with regards to their allowed alternate uniform allotment. The games received mixed responses from fans, with some praising the NFL for changing up their games in terms of uniforms, while others criticized the promotion for some of its garish uniforms. The promotion was officially discontinued for the 2018 NFL season, but many teams continue to wear the Color Rush uniforms and promote them heavily, notably the Cleveland Browns and the Pittsburgh Steelers.

National Football League Properties

National Football League Properties also known as NFL Properties (abbreviated NFLP) is the merchandising and licensing arm of the National Football League. The subsidiary of the league was founded in 1963 to maintain control of the brands of the league and its franchises and to license and negotiate with vendors to create official NFL merchandise. The NFL Properties head office is located in New York City.

New England Patriots

The New England Patriots are a professional American football team based in the Greater Boston area. The Patriots compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's American Football Conference (AFC) East division. The team plays its home games at Gillette Stadium in the town of Foxborough, Massachusetts, which is located 21 miles (34 km) southwest of downtown Boston, Massachusetts and 20 miles (32 km) northeast of downtown Providence, Rhode Island. The Patriots are also headquartered at Gillette Stadium.

An original member of the American Football League (AFL), the Patriots joined the NFL in the 1970 merger of the two leagues. The team changed its name from the original Boston Patriots after relocating to Foxborough in 1971. The Patriots played their home games at Foxboro Stadium from 1971 to 2001, then moved to Gillette Stadium at the start of the 2002 season. The Patriots' rivalry with the New York Jets is considered one of the most bitter rivalries in the NFL.

Since the arrival of head coach Bill Belichick and quarterback Tom Brady in 2000, the Patriots have since become one of the most successful teams in NFL history, claiming 16 AFC East titles as part of 18 consecutive winning seasons since 2001. The franchise has since set numerous notable records, including most wins in a ten-year period (126, in 2003–2012), an undefeated 16-game regular season in 2007, the longest winning streak consisting of regular season and playoff games in NFL history (a 21-game streak from October 2003 to October 2004), and the most consecutive division titles won by a team in NFL history (ten straight division titles from 2009 to 2018). The team owns the record for most Super Bowl appearances (nine) and wins (six) by a head coach–quarterback tandem, most Super Bowl appearances overall (eleven), tied with the Pittsburgh Steelers for the most Super Bowl wins (six), and tied with the Denver Broncos for the most Super Bowl losses (five).

New England Patriots Cheerleaders

The New England Patriots Cheerleaders are the official cheerleading squad of the NFL's New England Patriots first formed in 1971. The cheerleaders also make appearances off the field and overseas with Patriots mascot Pat Patriot, and also has a Junior Patriots Cheerleaders, with girls of ages 7–17 being allowed to join, with a fee of $425.00 per participant. The team also releases a swimsuit calendar yearly. The Patriots Cheerleaders' auditions take place at Gillette Stadium. In 2008, the squad went to China to train Chinese dancers for the 2008 Summer Olympics.

Franchise
Stadiums
Culture
Lore
Rivalries
Division championships (21)
Conference championships (11)
League championships (6)
Retired numbers
Media
Current league affiliations
Former league affiliation
Seasons (60)
AFC
NFC

Languages

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.