Pat Fischer

Patrick Fischer (born January 2, 1940 in St. Edward, Nebraska) is a former American football cornerback[1] in the National Football League for the St. Louis Cardinals from 1961 to 1967, and the Washington Redskins from 1968 to 1977.

Fischer attended Westside High School in Omaha and the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. At Nebraska, Fischer played safety, tailback, and quarterback.[2] Fischer joined the NFL as the 17th-round draft choice of St. Louis in the 1961 NFL Draft. He then signed with Washington as a free agent in 1968. He was a 1969 Pro Bowler. In 1972, the Redskins won the NFC championship game of the 1972–73 NFL playoffs against the Dallas Cowboys, when they limited Roger Staubach, their quarterback, to only 9 completions in 20 attempts for 98 passing yards and three allowed sacks, Fischer and Mike Bass, the other cornerback, being particularly successful in shutting down their wide receivers. But though the Redskin defense allowed only 69 net passing yards, it could not stop the Miami Dolphins's running game (184 rushing yards) in losing Super Bowl VII.

Fischer finished his 17-year career with 56 interceptions, and ranks seventh all-time in Redskins career interceptions with 27 and fourth all-time with 412 career interception return yards. At the time of his retirement, Fischer had played in 213 NFL games, then a record for a cornerback. He was well known for his strong tackling skills despite his diminutive size. Some of Fischer's most memorable defensive match-ups occurred against Philadelphia Eagles receiver Harold Carmichael who stood eleven inches taller than Fischer. Fischer's mantra "get a leg up and you own him" is used today to motivate and teach smaller defensive backs how to defend taller wide receivers.

In the late 1980s, NFL Films named Fischer as the Redskins All-Time Neutralizer sponsored by Tums. After retiring from the Redskins, Fischer worked as a stockbroker and owned a successful real estate business. In 2003, he was named to the Professional Football Researchers Association Hall of Very Good in the association's inaugural HOVG class.[3]

Fischer was nicknamed "The Mouse" for his relatively small size.[4] As of 2014, Fischer was suffering from "dementia, cognitive decline, and severe memory loss"[5] and was residing in an assisted-living facility.[6]

Pat Fischer
No. 37
Position:Cornerback
Personal information
Born:January 2, 1940 (age 79)
St. Edward, Nebraska
Height:5 ft 9 in (1.75 m)
Weight:170 lb (77 kg)
Career information
High school:Omaha (NE) Westside
College:Nebraska
NFL Draft:1961 / Round: 17 / Pick: 232
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Interceptions:56
Interceptions yards:941
Touchdowns:4
Player stats at NFL.com

See also

References

  1. ^ Denny, Stephen (2011-03-31). Killing Giants: 10 Strategies to Topple the Goliath in Your Industry. Penguin. pp. 90–. ISBN 9781591843832. Retrieved 18 July 2012.
  2. ^ http://www.washingtontimes.com/blog/redskins-fan-forum/2008/jun/30/whatever-happened-to-pat-fischer/
  3. ^ "Hall of Very Good". Retrieved May 24, 2016.
  4. ^ Shapiro, Leonard (February 2, 2018). "They were the first Redskins to play in the Super Bowl. Decades later, they're paying the price". The Washington Post. Known as 'the Mouse,' Fischer was listed in the team’s media guide as 5-foot-9 and 170 pounds, both exaggerations on the high side.
  5. ^ "Fight for old D.C. left a trail of injuries". The Washington Post. November 7, 2012.
  6. ^ Shapiro, Leonard (February 2, 2018). "They were the first Redskins to play in the Super Bowl. Decades later, they're paying the price". The Washington Post.
1958 Nebraska Cornhuskers football team

The 1958 Nebraska Cornhuskers football team was the representative of the University of Nebraska and member of the Big 7 Conference in the 1958 NCAA University Division football season. The team was coached by Bill Jennings and played their home games at Memorial Stadium in Lincoln, Nebraska.

1959 Nebraska Cornhuskers football team

The 1959 Nebraska Cornhuskers football team was the representative of the University of Nebraska and member of the Big 7 Conference in the 1959 college football season. The team was coached by Bill Jennings and played their home games at Memorial Stadium in Lincoln, Nebraska.

1960 Nebraska Cornhuskers football team

The 1960 Nebraska Cornhuskers football team was the representative of the University of Nebraska and member of the Big Eight Conference in the 1960 college football season. The team was coached by Bill Jennings and played their home games at Memorial Stadium in Lincoln, Nebraska.

1964 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team in the NFL in 1964. Players from the first and second teams are listed, with players from the first team in bold, where applicable.

1965 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of National Football League (American football) players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team in 1965. Players from the first and second teams are listed, with players from the first team in bold, where applicable.

1968 Washington Redskins season

The 1968 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 37th season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 32nd in Washington, D.C.. The team finished 5-9, failing to improve on their 5-6-3 record from 1967.

1972 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1972. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP, NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1972.

1973 Washington Redskins season

The 1973 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 42nd season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 37th in Washington, D.C..The team failed to improve on their 11–3 record from 1972, and finished 10-4

1974 Washington Redskins season

The 1974 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 43rd season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 38th in Washington, D.C.. the team matched on their 10–4 record from 1973. It's also notable for being Deacon Jones' first and only season with the Redskins; as well as being his final year in the NFL.

1975 Washington Redskins season

The 1975 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 44th season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 39th in Washington, D.C.. The team failed to improve on their 10–4 record from 1974 and finsished 8-6.

1976 Washington Redskins season

The 1976 Washington Redskins season was the franchise’s 45th overall and 40th in Washington, D.C. The season began with the team trying to improve on their 8–6 record from 1975, which they did, finishing 10-4, second in the NFC East behind the Dallas Cowboys. They would be eliminated from the NFL playoffs by the Minnesota Vikings. This was the first season as a Redskin for Hall of Fame running back John Riggins, signed as a free agent after spending the first five seasons of his career with the New York Jets. This was also the last season in which the Redskins would make the playoffs under Hall of Fame head coach George Allen.

1977 Washington Redskins season

The 1977 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 46th season overall, and would be the last under Hall of Fame head coach George Allen. The season began with the team trying to improve on their 10–4 record from 1976, but they would finish 9-5 and fail to qualify for postseason play.

Jet Award

The Jet Award, named in honor of 1972 Heisman Trophy Winner Johnny "The Jet" Rodgers, is awarded to the top return specialist in college football beginning with the 2011 season. Joe Adams was announced as the first winner on March 29, 2012. Beginning with the 2012 award ceremony, in addition to being given to the annual award winner, the Rodgers Award will be presented retroactively one decade at a time, starting with the 1959–1969 winners.

Jim Smith (defensive back)

James McCoy Smith (born November 4, 1946, Yazoo City, Mississippi) is a former American football defensive back in the National Football League for the Washington Redskins. He played high school football at Kearny High School (San Diego, California), and college football at the University of Oregon. He was nicknamed "Yazoo" because he was born in Yazoo City, Mississippi. He was an All-American his senior year (1967), and was drafted in the first round of the 1968 NFL Draft. He was the first defensive back taken in the draft, and the twelfth player overall.

He played all 14 games during his rookie season, but his career ended after one year because of a severe neck injury.After his career was cut short, Smith sued the NFL and the Redskins in federal court on the grounds that the draft was a violation of the Sherman Antitrust Act. He argued that he would have gotten a better deal if he could have negotiated with all teams instead of just one. He also sued for personal injuries.

Smith was awarded treble damages in the amount of $276,600. The Redskins paid him $50,000 for his first season, and an additional $19,800 for an option year on his rookie contract, for a total of $69,800. However, the district court found that he should have gotten a 3-year contract worth $162,200, like his free-agent veteran teammate Pat Fischer, who was also a defensive back. Smith's lawsuit was successful both at the federal district court level and appellate level and was eventually settled in 1979. In the meantime, the NFL agreed with the NFL Players Association to restructure the draft so it would no longer violate the antitrust laws.

Joe Lavender

Joseph "Joe" Lavender (born February 10, 1949) is a former American football cornerback who played ten seasons in the National Football League (NFL) for the Philadelphia Eagles from 1973–1975, and the Washington Redskins from 1976–1982.Born in rural Rayville, Louisiana, Joe moved with his parents to Southern California as a boy, where he attended Central Union High School in El Centro, California. He played college football at nearby San Diego State from 1969-72, then was selected by the Eagles in the twelfth round of the 1973 NFL Draft.

List of National Football League career interceptions leaders

This is the list of National Football League (NFL) players, who have recorded at least 50 interceptions.

Patrick F. Fischer

Patrick F. Fischer (born December 30, 1957) is a Justice of the Ohio Supreme Court. His term began January 1, 2017 and expires December 31, 2022.

Patrick Fischer (disambiguation)

Patrick Fischer (born 1975) is a Swiss ice hockey player.

Patrick Fischer may also refer to:

Patrick C. Fischer (1935–2011), computer scientist and Unabomber target

Patrick F. Fischer (born 1957), justice on the Ohio Supreme Court

Pat Fischer (born 1940), American football player

Westside High School (Omaha)

Westside High School is the only high school of the Westside Community Schools district (also known as District 66 to local residents) of Omaha, Nebraska, United States.

Jet Award winners

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