Pat Dillingham

Patrick Martin Dillingham (born August 16, 1983) was an American football quarterback for the Notre Dame Fighting Irish.[1]

Pat Dillingham
Notre Dame Fighting Irish No. 9
PositionQuarterback
Career history
College
Personal information
Born:August 16, 1983 (age 35)
Portola Valley, California
Height6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
Weight205 lb (93 kg)

Early years

Dillingham attended St. Francis High School in Mountain View, California. As a senior, he threw for 1,505 yards with 11 touchdowns.

College career

After not seeing any game action as a freshman in 2001, Pat played in seven games and started against Stanford during his Sophomore year. During the 2002 season, Dillingham completed 41 of 81 passes for 434 yards with one touchdown and seven interceptions. Dillingham came off the bench replacing an injured Carlyle Holiday to drive a comeback against Michigan State in the final minutes.

His most memorable play was during the Boston College game. Coming off an 8-0 start, Notre Dame was heavily favored in a home match up against an unranked opponent. Carlyle Holiday sustained a head injury, forcing Dillingham to take over in the first half. Tied at 7, Dillingham was leading a drive and made it to the red zone. On a scoring drive Dillingham threw a shovel pass to a BC linebacker who returned it 71 yards to score. This was ultimately the decisive touchdown as neither team scored in the second half.[2]

In his Junior season, Dillingham only saw playing time in a single drive against Stanford.

Dillingham is currently the founder and CEO of Windy Hill Spirits. [3]

References

  1. ^ "Notre Dame player". Und.com. 1983-08-16. Retrieved 2012-09-02.
  2. ^ "Eagles Shock No. 4 Notre Dame, 14-7 - BCEAGLES.COM - Boston College Official Athletic Site". Bceagles.Com. Retrieved 2012-09-02.
  3. ^ "Marine veteran and Notre Dame quarterback make all-American moonshine". foxnews.com. Retrieved 2016-08-02.
  • Rosenblatt, Richard. "Eagles Shock No. 4 Notre Dame, 14-7", Associated Press, South Bend, 2 November 2002.
2001 Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team

The 2001 Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team represented the University of Notre Dame in the 2001 NCAA Division I-A football season. The team was coached by Bob Davie and played its home games at Notre Dame Stadium in South Bend, Indiana.

2002 Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team

The 2002 Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team represented the University of Notre Dame in the 2002 NCAA Division I-A football season. The team was coached by Tyrone Willingham and played its home games at Notre Dame Stadium in South Bend, Indiana.

2003 Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team

The 2003 Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team represented the University of Notre Dame in the 2003 NCAA Division I-A football season. The team was coached by Tyrone Willingham and played its home games at Notre Dame Stadium in South Bend, Indiana. The Irish finished the season at 5–7 and failed to become bowl eligible. The season was punctuated by a pair of three-game losing streaks and ugly blowout losses against Michigan, USC and Florida State.

Holy War (Boston College vs. Notre Dame)

The Holy War is an American rivalry between the Boston College Eagles and University of Notre Dame Fighting Irish, a technical nonconference rivalry in college football, but in most sports an Atlantic Coast Conference rivalry. The series derives its name from the fact that the Eagles and the Fighting Irish represent the only two Catholic universities in the United States which still compete in the Football Bowl Subdivision of the National Collegiate Athletic Association, the highest level of competition in American college football.

List of Notre Dame Fighting Irish starting quarterbacks

The following individuals have started games at quarterback for the University of Notre Dame football team, updated through the 2018 season.

The year of induction into the College Football Hall of Fame, if applicable, is designated alongside the respective player's final season.

Notre Dame Fighting Irish football under Tyrone Willingham

The Notre Dame Fighting Irish were led by Tyrone Willingham and represented the University of Notre Dame in NCAA Division I college football from 2002 to 2004. The team was an independent and played their home games in Notre Dame Stadium. Throughout the three seasons, the Irish were 21–16 (21–15 before Willingham was fired) and were invited to two bowl games, both of which they lost.

After the 2001 season, fifth-year head coach Bob Davie was fired. His immediate replacement, George O'Leary, was forced to resign under some controversy for discrepancies on his resume, and Willingham was chosen to replace him. Willingham made immediate changes to the program and won his first eight games. Although his team floundered at the end of the season and lost their bowl game, he led the team to 10 wins and was named "Coach of the Year" by two different publications. His second year began with the signing of a top-5 recruiting class to replace a number of players who graduated. Although the team began the season with a win, they lost their next two games, and freshman quarterback Brady Quinn became the starter. Quinn led the Irish to four more wins that season, and the team finished a 5–7 record.

Willingham's third season started with a loss, but three straight wins brought the team back into national prominence. The team went on to win six games, but their fifth loss of the season, a blowout to the University of Southern California (USC) Trojans, was Willingham's final game at Notre Dame. Although the Irish were invited to a bowl game at the end of the season, Willingham was fired. The eventual hiring of Charlie Weis as Willingham's replacement was called a good move, but Willingham's firing remained a controversial subject for years following his tenure.

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