Parrot-billed sparrow

The parrot-billed sparrow (Passer gongonensis) is found in the arid lowlands of eastern Africa. At 18 centimetres (7.1 in) and 42 grams (1.5 oz), it is largest of the sparrows of the family Passeridae. It is often considered a subspecies of the grey-headed sparrow.

Parrot-billed sparrow
Passer gongonensis Amboseli 1
In Amboseli National Park, Kenya
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Passeriformes
Family: Passeridae
Genus: Passer
Species:
P. gongonensis
Binomial name
Passer gongonensis
(Oustalet, 1890)

References

  1. ^ BirdLife International (2012). "Passer gongonensis". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 26 November 2013.

External links

List of birds by common name

In this list of birds by common name, a total of 9,722 extant and recently extinct bird species are recognised, belonging to a total of 204 families.

List of birds of Africa

This is a list of the bird species recorded in Africa. The area covered by this list is the Africa region defined by the American Birding Association's listing rules. In addition to the continent itself, the area includes Socotra in the Arabian Sea, Zanzibar, the Canary Islands, and São Tomé, Príncipe, and Annobon in the Gulf of Guinea. It does not include Madeira, the Azores, Cape Verde, the Sinai Peninsula, Madagascar, Seychelles or the Comoro Islands.

This list is that of the African Bird Club (ABC) supplemented by Bird Checklists of the World (Avibase) and The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World.This list's taxonomic treatment (designation and sequence of orders, families, and species) and nomenclature (common and scientific names) are those of the Clements list. Taxonomic changes are on-going. As more research is gathered from studies of distribution, behavior, and DNA, the names, sequence, and number of families and species change every year. Furthermore, different approaches to ornithological nomenclature have led to concurrent systems of classification (see Sibley-Ahlquist taxonomy). Differences in common and scientific names between the Clements taxonomy and that of the ABC are frequent but are seldom noted here.

List of birds of Ethiopia

This is a list of the bird species recorded in Ethiopia. The avifauna of Ethiopia include a total of 864 confirmed species as of June 2018. Of them, 25 are accidental, 17 are endemic, and one has been introduced by humans. An additional 16 species are hypothetical as defined below. Unless otherwise noted, the list is that of iGoTerra.This list's taxonomic treatment (designation and sequence of orders, families and species) and nomenclature (common and scientific names) follow the conventions of The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World, 2018 edition.The following tags highlight several categories of occurrence other than regular migrants and residents.

(A) Accidental - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in Ethiopia (also called a vagrant)

(E) Endemic - a species endemic to Ethiopia

(I) Introduced - a species introduced to Ethiopia as a consequence, direct or indirect, of human actions

(H) Hypothetical - a species possibly present but which has not been documented.

List of birds of Kenya

This is a list of the bird species recorded in Kenya. The avifauna of Kenya include a total of 1105 species, of which eight are endemic, 75 are accidental, and two have been introduced by humans. An additional six species are considered "uncertain" (see below) and are not included in the count.

This list's taxonomic treatment (designation and sequence of orders, families and species) and nomenclature (common and scientific names) follow the conventions of The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World, 2018 edition. Unless otherwise noted, the list is that of the African Bird Club's Checklist of the Birds of Kenya. The club will be referred to as ABC throughout. Differences in common and scientific names between the Clements taxonomy and that of the ABC are frequent but are seldom noted here.

The following tags highlight several categories of occurrence other than regular migrants and non-endemic residents. The "A", "I", and "U" tags follow the ABC list. The "E" tags are based on Clements, because the ABC does not note endemics. The notes of population status are from the Avibase Bird Checklists of the World.

(A) Accidental - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in Kenya (also called a vagrant)

(E) Endemic - a species endemic to Kenya

(I) Introduced - a species introduced to Kenya as a consequence, direct or indirect, of human actions

(U) Uncertain - a species recorded but not confirmed in Kenya

List of birds of Somalia

This is a list of the bird species recorded in Somalia. The avifauna of Somalia include a total of 727 species, of which eight are endemic, one has been introduced by humans and one is rare or accidental. Fourteen species are globally threatened.

This list's taxonomic treatment (designation and sequence of orders, families and species) and nomenclature (common and scientific names) follow the conventions of The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World, 6th edition. The family accounts at the beginning of each heading reflect this taxonomy, as do the species counts found in each family account. Introduced and accidental species are included in the total counts for Somalia.

The following tags have been used to highlight several categories, but not all species fall into one of these categories. Those that do not are commonly occurring native species.

(A) Accidental - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in Somalia

(E) Endemic - a species endemic to Somalia

(I) Introduced - a species introduced to Somalia as a consequence, direct or indirect, of human actions

List of birds of South Sudan

This is a list of the bird species recorded in South Sudan. The avifauna of South Sudan include a total of 884 species.

This list's taxonomic treatment (designation and sequence of orders, families and species) and nomenclature (common and scientific names) follow the conventions of The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World, 6th edition. The family accounts at the beginning of each heading reflect this taxonomy, as do the species counts found in each family account. Introduced and accidental species are included in the total counts for South Sudan.

The following tags have been used to highlight several categories. The commonly occurring native species do not fall into any of these categories.

(A) Accidental - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in South Sudan

(E) Endemic - a species endemic to South Sudan

(I) Introduced - a species introduced to South Sudan as a consequence, direct or indirect, of human actions

List of birds of Tanzania

This is a list of the bird species recorded in Tanzania. The avifauna of Tanzania include a total of 1050 species, of which 26 are endemic, 30 are accidental, and two have been introduced by humans. An additional four species are considered "uncertain" (see below) and are not included in the count.

This list's taxonomic treatment (designation and sequence of orders, families and species) and nomenclature (common and scientific names) follow the conventions of The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World, 2018 edition. Unless otherwise noted, the list is that of the African Bird Club's Checklist of the Birds of Tanzania. The Club will be referred to as ABC throughout. Differences in common and scientific names between the Clements taxonomy and that of the ABC are frequent but are seldom noted here.

The following tags highlight several categories of occurrence other than regular migrants and non-endemic residents. The "A", "I", and "U" tags follow the ABC list. The "E" tags are based on Clements, because the ABC does not note endemics. The notes of population status are from the Avibase Bird Checklists of the World.

(A) Accidental - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in Tanzania (also called a vagrant)

(E) Endemic - a species endemic to Tanzania

(I) Introduced - a species introduced to Tanzania as a consequence, direct or indirect, of human actions

(U) Uncertain - a species recorded but not confirmed in Tanzania

List of birds of Uganda

This is a list of the bird species recorded in Uganda. The avifauna of Uganda include a total of 1031 confirmed species, of which 58 are accidental. An additional 19 species are considered "uncertain" (see below) and are not included in the count. One species is endemic.

This list's taxonomic treatment (designation and sequence of orders, families and species) and nomenclature (common and scientific names) follow the conventions of The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World, 2018 edition. Unless otherwise noted, the list is that of the African Bird Club's (ABC) Checklist of the Birds of Uganda. Differences in common and scientific names between the Clements taxonomy and that of the ABC are frequent but are seldom noted here.

The following tags highlight several categories of occurrence other than regular migrants and residents.

(A) Accidental - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in Uganda (also called a vagrant)

(U) Uncertain - a species recorded but not confirmed in Uganda

(E) Endemic - a species endemic to Uganda

List of least concern birds

As of May 2019, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) lists 8405 least concern avian species. 76% of all evaluated avian species are listed as least concern.

No subpopulations of birds have been evaluated by the IUCN.

This is a complete list of least concern avian species evaluated by the IUCN. Where possible common names for taxa are given while links point to the scientific name used by the IUCN.

Northern grey-headed sparrow

The northern grey-headed sparrow (Passer griseus), also known as the grey-headed or common grey-headed sparrow, is a species of bird in the sparrow family Passeridae, which is resident in much of tropical Africa. It occurs in a wide range of open habitats, including open woodlands and human habitation, often occupying the same niche as the house sparrow does in Eurasia.The adult northern grey-headed sparrow has a pale grey head with a white moustache stripe, pale brown upperparts, whitish underparts and chestnut wings with a small white shoulder patch. The sexes are similar, but young birds are slightly duller and lack the white wing patch. There are three subspecies, differing in plumage tone, especially with regard to the darkness of the head.This sparrow is mainly resident in its range, but there is some seasonal movement, and flocks of up to 50 birds form outside the breeding season. It builds a cup nest in trees, thatch, or old nests of other birds; 2–4 eggs are laid.This species feeds principally on seeds and grain, like other sparrows, but will readily take insects including termites, especially when feeding young.The calls include cheeps and chirps, and the typical sparrow churring alarm call.The northern grey-headed sparrow is replaced in eastern and southern Africa by very similar birds that are sometimes considered races of this species: Swainson's sparrow, the parrot-billed sparrow, the Swahili sparrow, and the southern grey-headed sparrow. According to phylogenetic studies by Arnaiz-Villena et al., this species is indeed related to the other grey-headed sparrows, and these species together are most closely related within genus Passer to the house sparrow and allies.

Passer

Passer is a genus of sparrows, also known as the true sparrows. The genus includes the house sparrow and the Eurasian tree sparrow, some of the most common birds in the world. They are small birds with thick bills for eating seeds, and are mostly coloured grey or brown. Native to the Old World, some species have been introduced throughout the world.

Sibley-Monroe checklist 17

The Sibley-Monroe checklist was a landmark document in the study of birds. It drew on extensive DNA-DNA hybridisation studies to reassess the relationships between modern birds.

Sparrow

Sparrows are a family of small passerine birds. They are also known as true sparrows, or Old World sparrows, names also used for a particular genus of the family, Passer. They are distinct from both the American sparrows, in the family Passerellidae, and from a few other birds sharing their name, such as the Java sparrow of the family Estrildidae. Many species nest on buildings and the house and Eurasian tree sparrows, in particular, inhabit cities in large numbers, so sparrows are among the most familiar of all wild birds. They are primarily seed-eaters, though they also consume small insects. Some species scavenge for food around cities and, like gulls or rock doves will happily eat virtually anything in small quantities.

Sparrows (family: Passeridae)
Genus
Hypocryptadius
Passer
Carpospiza
Petronia
Gymnoris
Montifringilla
Onychostruthus
Pyrgilauda

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