Parlais

Parlais is a former Roman city of Pisidia (in Asia Minor).

History

As a Roman colony it was called Julia Augusta Parlais, and money was coined under this title.[1] Ptolemy[2] calls it Paralais and places it in Lycaonia (also in Asia Minor). Kiepert identified it with Barla, in the Ottoman vilayet of Koniah, but W. M. Ramsay[3] believes that it is contained in the ruins known as Uzumla Monastir. Modern scholars follow Kiepert.[4]

Ecclesiastical history

The bishopric of Parlais was a suffragan of Antioch, the metropolitan see of the province.

The Notitiæ Episcopatuum mention the see as late as the 13th century under the names Parlaos, Paralaos and even Parallos. Four bishops are known from their participation in church councils: Patricius, Constantinople, 381; Libanius, Chalcedon, 451 (in the decrees the see is placed in Lycaonia); George, Constantinople, 692; Anthimus, Constantinople, 879. Academius who assisted at the First Council of Nicaea, 325, was Bishop of Pappa, not of Parlais as Le Quien claims.[5]

It is included in the Catholic Church's list of titular sees.[6]

Notes

  1. ^ Eckhel, "Historica veterum nummorum", III, 33.
  2. ^ V, 6, 16.
  3. ^ Asia Minor, 390 sqq.
  4. ^ Lund University. Digital Atlas of the Roman Empire.
  5. ^ Oriens christianus, I, 1057.
  6. ^ Annuario Pontificio 2013 (Libreria Editrice Vaticana, 2013, ISBN 978-88-209-9070-1), p. 950

References

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainHerbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "Parlais" . Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton.

Coordinates: 38°01′00″N 30°47′00″E / 38.016667°N 30.783333°E

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Commonly misspelled words in French

Misspellings in French are a subset of errors in French orthography.

Many errors are caused by homonyms, for example French contains hundreds of words ending with IPA [εn] written diversely as -ène, -en, -enne, -aine.Many French words and verb endings end with silent consonants, lettres muettes, creating also homonyms are spelled differently but pronounced identically: tu parles, il parle, ils parlent, or confusion of je parlais instead of je parlai. Homonyms also occur with accents il eut dit compared with il eût dit.

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Traditionally, the imperfect of languages such as Latin and French is referred to as one of the tenses, although it actually encodes aspectual information in addition to tense (time reference). It may be more precisely called past imperfective.'

English has no general imperfective and expresses it in different ways. The term "imperfect" in English refers to forms much more commonly called past progressive or past continuous (like was doing or were doing). These are combinations of past tense with specifically continuous or progressive aspect. In German, Imperfekt formerly referred to the simply conjugated past tense (to contrast with the Perfekt or compound past form), but the term Präteritum (preterite) is now preferred, since the form does not carry any implication of imperfective aspect.

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