Paris Musées

Paris Musées is a public institution that has incorporated in the same entity the 14 City of Paris Museums plus staff in charge of management, collection monitoring and production of exhibitions, events and editions, bringing together about 1000 employees. The headquarters are at the following address: 27 rue des Petites Ecuries, 75 010 Paris.

The City of Paris Museums are :

Mission statement

The public institution Paris Musées main mission is to manage the museums attached to it and allow them and their directors to run their scientific and cultural projects. The headquarters staff’s responsibility is to make sure the global cultural program is coherent and that priorities and goals fixed by the City of Paris are achieved, especially the ones concerning temporary exhibitions, catalogues and other cultural editions, educational and cultural programs.

History

Before January 1, 2013, museums were managed directly by the City of Paris, with a contractor, former company “Paris Musées”, in charge of the production of exhibitions and catalogues.

Therefore, Paris Musées was alternately a non-profit organization created in 1985, then a limited company and public contractor February 28, 2008 and since January 1st 2013, Paris Musées is a public institution: “établissement public local, à caractère administratif”.

Goals of the reform

This reform was decided by the mayor of Paris, Bertrand Delanoë, to promote and enhance the City of Paris Museums network.

The legal and financial autonomy given by the new entity, independent from the City of Paris’ administration, will facilitate management and responsiveness, as was the case for the major national museums. Keeping all museums in a single entity maintains the uniqueness of the municipal collection and enables the input of a more coherent strategy, therefore allowing economies of scale and better interactions between museums.

Missions

Priorities fixed by the City of Paris :[1]

  • Develop and highlight the museums’ collections. Through their computerization and digitization, research, programming of various events and exhibitions meant to make the municipal collections more known. Access to the City of Paris Museums’ collections is free since 2001.
  • Produce high quality exhibitions and publications, contributing the Paris cultural wealth and influence, nationally and internationally
  • Develop and expand audience through reinforced educational policies and major focus on visit comfort and visitors programs. Today, the City of Paris’ Museums have more than 2 million visitors each year. They would like to strengthen those figures while contributing in making culture more accessible to all visitors.

Board of directors and executive office

The public institution Paris Musées was created at the “Conseil de Paris” on the June 20th 2012 session.[2] Its first board meeting took place last July on the 12th. Its chairman is Anne HIDALGO, first deputy mayor. Danièle POURTAUD, deputy mayor for heritage is vice chairman.

The Board of Directors counts nine Paris counseling members:

  • Geneviève BERTRAND
  • BOULAY-ESPERONNIER
  • Danielle FOURNIER
  • Christophe GIRARD
  • Bruno JULLIARD
  • Hélène MACE DE LEPINAY
  • Danielle SIMONNET

The Board also counts 4 qualified and renowned members:

  • Martin BETHENOD, director of the Palazzo Grassi in Venice
  • Jean-François CHOUGNET, director of Marseille-Provence 2013
  • Gaïta LEBOISSETIER, deputy director, in charge of education at the National Superior School of Fine Arts
  • Antoinette Le NORMAND-ROMAIN, executive director at the National Institute of Art History

Delphine LEVY, who conducted the reform’s project, was designated chief executive director.

References

  1. ^ "L'Établissement Public Paris Musées | Paris Musées" (in French). Parismusees.paris.fr. Retrieved 2014-01-31.
  2. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on August 24, 2012. Retrieved May 10, 2013.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)

External links

Antoine Bourdelle

Antoine Bourdelle (30 October 1861 – 1 October 1929), born Émile Antoine Bordelles, was an influential and prolific French sculptor and teacher. He was a student of Auguste Rodin, a teacher of Giacometti and Henri Matisse, and an important figure in the transition from the Beaux-Arts style to modern sculpture.

His studio became the Musée Bourdelle, an art museum dedicated to his work, located at 18, rue Antoine Bourdelle, in the 15th arrondissement of Paris, France.

Catacombs of Paris

The Catacombs of Paris (French: Catacombes de Paris, ) are underground ossuaries in Paris, France, which hold the remains of more than six million people in a small part of a tunnel network built to consolidate Paris' ancient stone mines. Extending south from the Barrière d'Enfer ("Gate of Hell") former city gate, this ossuary was created as part of the effort to eliminate the city's overflowing cemeteries. Preparation work began not long after a 1774 series of gruesome Saint Innocents-cemetery-quarter basement wall collapses added a sense of urgency to the cemetery-eliminating measure, and from 1786, nightly processions of covered wagons transferred remains from most of Paris' cemeteries to a mine shaft opened near the Rue de la Tombe-Issoire.

The ossuary remained largely forgotten until it became a novelty-place for concerts and other private events in the early 19th century; after further renovations and the construction of accesses around Place Denfert-Rochereau, it was open to public visitation from 1874. Since January 1, 2013, the Catacombs number among the 14 City of Paris Museums managed by Paris Musées. Although the ossuary comprises only a small section of the underground "carrières de Paris" ("quarries of Paris"), Parisians presently often refer to the entire tunnel network as the catacombs.

Galerie Kamel Mennour

Galerie Kamel Mennour is a Parisian contemporary art gallery owned and directed by Kamel Mennour.

Maison de Balzac

The Maison de Balzac is a writer's house museum in the former residence of French novelist Honoré de Balzac (1799–1850). It is located in the 16th arrondissement at 47, rue Raynouard, Paris, France, and open daily except Mondays and holidays; admission to the house is free, but a fee is charged for its temporary exhibitions. The nearest métro and RER stations are Passy and Avenue du Président Kennedy.

The modest house, with its courtyard and garden, is located within the residential district of Passy near the Bois de Boulogne. Having fled his creditors, Balzac rented its top floor from 1840-1847 under his housekeeper's name (Mr. de Breugnol). It was acquired by the city of Paris in 1949, and is now one of the city's three literary museums, along with the Maison de Victor Hugo and the Musée de la Vie Romantique (George Sand). It is the only one of Balzac's many residences still in existence.

Balzac's five-room apartment was located on the top floor, at three levels, and as today opened into the garden. Here he edited La Comedie humaine and wrote some of his finest novels, including La Rabouilleuse, Une ténébreuse affaire, and La Cousine Bette. Although the writer's furniture was dispersed after his widow's death, the museum now contains Balzac's writing desk and chair, his turquoise-studded cane by Lecointe (1834), and his tea kettle and a coffee pot given to him by Zulma Carraud in 1832.

The museum also contains an 1842 daguerreotype of Balzac by Louis-Auguste Bisson, a drawing of Balzac by Paul Gavarni (c. 1840), a pastel portrait (c. 1798) of Balzac's mother Laure Sallambier (1778–1854), an oil portrait (c. 1795-1814) of his father Bernard-François Balzac (1746–1829), and 19th-century prints by renowned artists including Paul Gavarni, Honoré Daumier, Grandville, and Henry Bonaventure Monnier.

Since 1971 the house's ground floor has contained a library of the author's manuscripts, original and subsequent editions, illustrations, books annotated and signed by Balzac, books devoted to Balzac, and other books and magazines of the period.

In 2012, Balzac's House was renovated in order to meet current standards and now has a more modern appearance.

The house is also notable for underlying cavities which have been identified by pottery shards as former troglodyte dwellings dated to the time of the late Middle Ages. These excavations, however, are not open to the public.

Balzac's House is one of the 14 City of Paris' Museums that have been incorporated since January 1, 2013 in the public institution Paris Musées.

Maison de Victor Hugo

Maison de Victor Hugo is a writer's house museum located where Victor Hugo lived for 16 years between 1832–1848. It is one of the 14 City of Paris' Museums that have been incorporated since January 1, 2013 in the public institution Paris Musées.

Musée Bourdelle

The Musée Bourdelle is an art museum located at 18, rue Antoine Bourdelle, in the 15th arrondissement of Paris, France. It is open daily, except Mondays. The nearest Paris Métro stations are Falguière and Montparnasse – Bienvenüe.

The museum preserves the studio of sculptor Antoine Bourdelle (1861–1929), and provides an example of Parisian ateliers from the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It was Bourdelle's active studio from 1885-1929.

In 1922 he began plans to turn his studio into a museum; in the early 1930s Gabriel Cognacq provided funds to purchase the studio and thus avoid dispersing the artist's remaining works. The museum was inaugurated in 1949, and expanded in 1961 by architect Henri Gautruche and again in 1992 by Christian de Portzamparc.

Today the museum contains more than 500 works including marble, plaster, and bronze statues, paintings, pastels, fresco sketches, and Bourdelle's personal collection of works by artists including Eugène Carrière, Eugène Delacroix, Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres, Adolphe Joseph Thomas Monticelli, Pierre Puvis de Chavannes, and Auguste Rodin. It contains the original plaster casts of some of his finest works including 21 studies of Ludwig van Beethoven, as well as document archives and his copies of Greek and medieval works.

Since June 2012, museum's visitors follow a different path through the permanent collections: educational, chronological and attuned to the work, highlighting Bourdelle’s artistic evolution.

Bourdelle Museum is one of the 14 City of Paris' Museums that have been incorporated since January 1st 2013 in the public institution Paris Musées.

A second Bourdelle garden-museum, in Égreville, was established by his heirs in the late 1960s. It hosts another 56 of his sculptures.

Musée Carnavalet

The Musée Carnavalet in Paris is dedicated to the history of the city. The museum occupies two neighboring mansions: the Hôtel Carnavalet and the former Hôtel Le Peletier de Saint Fargeau. On the advice of Baron Haussmann, the civil servant who transformed Paris in the latter half of the 19th century, the Hôtel Carnavalet was purchased by the Municipal Council of Paris in 1866; it was opened to the public in 1880. By the latter part of the 20th century, the museum was full to capacity. The Hôtel Le Peletier de Saint Fargeau was annexed to the Carnavalet and opened to the public in 1989.Carnavalet Museum is one of the 14 City of Paris' Museums that have been incorporated since January 1, 2013 in the public institution Paris Musées. It's closed for renovation till the end of 2019.

Musée Cernuschi

The Musée Cernuschi (French pronunciation: ​[my.ze sɛʁ.ny.ʃi]) (Cernuschi Museum) is an Asian art museum, specialising in works from China, Japan, and Korea, located at 7 avenue Vélasquez, near Parc Monceau, in Paris, France. Its collection in Asian art is second only to the Musée Guimet in Paris. The nearest Paris Métro stops to the museum are Villiers or Monceau on Paris Métro Line 21Line 21.

The Cernuschi Museum is one of the 21 City of Paris' Museums that have been incorporated since January 21, 2013 in the public institution Paris Musées.

Musée Cognacq-Jay

The Musée Cognacq-Jay is a museum located in the Hôtel Donon in the 3rd arrondissement at 8 rue Elzévir, Paris, France. It is open daily except Monday; admission is free. The nearest Metro stations are Saint-Paul and Chemin Vert.

The museum's collection was formed between 1900–1925 by Théodore-Ernest Cognacq (1839–1928) and his wife Marie-Louise Jay (1838–1925), founders of La Samaritaine department store. At his death, Cognacq gave the collection to the City of Paris, which in 1929 inaugurated the Musée Cognacq-Jay at 25 boulevard des Capucines, a building especially conceived for it by the Cognacq couple, who wished to display the collection in the intimacy of a seemingly inhabited home, without the conventions of a museum. In 1990 however, the City, arguing that the Boulevard des Capucines was not part of a "cultural circuit", sought the approval of the legal heirs (the owners of La Samaritaine), and, under silent disagreement of the Cognacq-Jay family, moved the collection to the ill-fitting Hôtel Donon (c. 1575) in the Marais, where the collection is displayed in twenty paneled rooms (four floors) in the styles of Louis XV and Louis XVI. The renovation work of the Hôtel Donon was led by Paris' chief architect Bernard Fonquernie, whilst the interior renovation was done by Reoven Vardi.

The museum contains an exceptional collection of fine art and decorative items, about 1200 items in total, with an emphasis on 18th century France, ranging from European and Chinese ceramics, jewels, and snuffboxes, to paintings by Louis-Léopold Boilly, François Boucher, Canaletto, Jean-Siméon Chardin, Jean-Honoré Fragonard, Jean-Baptiste Greuze, Maurice Quentin de La Tour, Sir Thomas Lawrence, Hubert Robert, Giovanni Battista Tiepolo, and Jean-Antoine Watteau; sculpture by Jean-Antoine Houdon, Jean-Baptiste Lemoyne, and Jacques-François-Joseph Saly; and fine furniture attributed to Jean-François Oeben and Roger Vandercruse Lacroix. 17th century is also represented, notably with two paintings by Rembrandt while 19th century is represented with works by Camille Corot, Paul Cézanne and also Edgar Degas.

The Cognacq-Jay Museum is one of the 14 City of Paris' Museums that have been incorporated since 1 January 2013 in the public institution Paris Musées.

Musée Zadkine

The Musée Zadkine is a museum dedicated to the work of sculptor Ossip Zadkine (1890–1967). It is located near the Jardin du Luxembourg in the 6th arrondissement at 100 bis, rue d'Assas, Paris, France, and open daily except Monday; an admission fee is only charged when an exhibition is on. The museum also contains a fine garden, with no charge for entry. The nearest métro and RER stations are Port-Royal and Vavin.

The museum was established by Valentine Prax, Zadkine's wife, who willed their home and studio since 1928, plus his personal collection, to the City of Paris. The museum was inaugurated in 1982 following her death, and has subsequently augmented its collection by purchases. It now contains about 300 sculptures, as well as drawings, photographs, and tapestries. Since 1995 the museum has also presented 3 to 4 exhibits of contemporary art each year.

The Museum has been renovated in 2012 to ensure its accessibility to all visitors. It re-opened its doors for its thirtieth anniversary on October 10, 2012. The new museography was designed to more closely reflect the spirit of the workshop.

Zadkine Museum is one of the 14 City of Paris' Museums that have been incorporated since January 1, 2013 in the public institution Paris Musées.

Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris

Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris (French pronunciation: ​[myze daʁ mɔdɛʁn də la vil də paʁi], City of Paris' Museum of Modern Art) or MAMVP, is a major municipal museum dedicated to modern and contemporary art of the 20th and 21st centuries. It is located at 11, Avenue du Président Wilson in the 16th arrondissement of Paris.The museum is one of the 14 City of Paris' Museums that have been incorporated since 1 January 2013 in the public institution Paris Musées.

Musée de la Vie romantique

The Musée de la Vie romantique (The Museum of Romantic Life, or Museum of the Romantics) stands at the foot of Montmartre hill in the 9th arrondissement of Paris, 16 rue Chaptal, Paris, France in an 1830 hôtel particulier facing two twin-studios, a greenhouse, a small garden, and a paved courtyard. The museum is open daily except Monday. Permanent collections are free. An admission fee is charged for temporary exhibitions. The nearest métro stations are Pigalle, Blanche, Saint-Georges, and Liège.

The Musée de la Vie romantique is one of the 14 City of Paris Museums that have been incorporated since January 1, 2013 in the public institution Paris Musées.

Palais Galliera

The Palais Galliera, also formally known as the Musée de la Mode de la Ville de Paris (City of Paris Fashion Museum), and formerly known as Musée Galliera, is a museum of fashion and fashion history located at 10, avenue Pierre 1er de Serbie, in the 16th arrondissement of Paris, France. It is open daily except Mondays and public holidays; an admission fee is charged and varies depending on the exhibition programmed. The museum has no permanent displays due to conservation issues.

The museum opened its doors again 28 September 2013 after being closed for major renovation.

Palais Galliera is one of the 14 City of Paris museums that have been incorporated since 1 January 2013 in the public institution Paris Musées.

Passage Brady

Passage Brady is one of two iron-and-glass covered arcades (known in French as the Passages couverts de Paris) located in the 10th arrondissement of Paris, France constructed in 1828. It lies between Rue du Faubourg-Saint-Denis and Rue du Faubourg-Saint-Martin.

It is famous for the several Indian, Pakistani and Bangladeshi restaurants located in the arcade.

Petit Palais

The Petit Palais (small palace) is an art museum in the 8th arrondissement of Paris, France.

Built for the 1900 Exposition Universelle ("universal exhibition"), it now houses the City of Paris Museum of Fine Arts (Musée des beaux-arts de la ville de Paris). The Petit Palais is located across from the Grand Palais on Avenue Nicolas II, today Avenue Winston-Churchill. The other façades of the building face the Seine and Avenue des Champs-Elysees.The Petit Palais is one of 14 museums of the City of Paris that have been incorporated since January 1, 2013, in the public corporation Paris Musées. It has been listed since 1975 as a monument historique by the French Ministry of Culture.

Salon des Cent

Salon des Cent ("Salon of the One Hundred") was a commercial art exhibition in Paris, based at 31 Rue Bonaparte.

The Salon sold color posters, prints and reproductions of artwork to the general public at reasonable prices. It was established in February 1894 by Léon Deschamps, founder of La Plume ("The Pen") an avant garde literary and artistic magazine. It became known for its exhibitions showcasing the works of contemporary graphical artists. The salon held exhibitions until 1900. Many of the posters advertising Salon des Cent exhibitions have themselves become collectors' items.

Solidays

Solidays is a French annual music festival that takes place at the Longchamp Racecourse in Paris at the end of June. Organised by Solidarité sida (a French HIV/AIDS awareness group for youth), the event brings together more than 150 artists and 170 000 festival-goers for three days (Friday, Saturday and Sunday). The proceeds from the festival are donated to organisations fighting against AIDS, especially for those focusing on the African continent.

The festival has been held since 1999. The performers involved in Solidays accept a reduced fee or appear for free as a sign of their solidarity. The 2013 edition raised over 2 million euros. The festival also features bungee jumping in addition to the music.Over the years, many French and foreign artists have appeared at Solidays, including DJ Snake, Bigflo & Oli, Kungs, Mac Miller, Vanessa Paradis, M83, Synapson, Paul Kalkbrenner, Bénabar, Madeon, Shaka Ponk, David Guetta, Kool & the Gang, Stromae, Louis Bertignac, Lily Allen, Louise Attaque, Grand Corps Malade, Earth, Wind & Fire and Diplo.

Viaduc d'Austerlitz

Viaduc d'Austerlitz (English: Austerlitz Viaduct) is a single-deck, steel arch, rail bridge that crosses the Seine in Paris, France. Its usage is solely dedicated to Line 5 of the Paris Métro. It links Gare d'Austerlitz on the left bank to Quai de la Rapée on the other side of the river.

Élisabeth Lebovici

Élisabeth Lebovici (born 1953) is a French art historian, journalist, and art critic.

Landmarks
Museums
Religious buildings
Hôtels particuliers
and palaces
Bridges, streets,
areas, squares
and waterways
Parks and gardens
Sport venues
Cemeteries
Région parisienne
Culture and events
Other

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.