Pardine genet

The pardine genet (Genetta pardina), also known as the West African large spotted genet, is a genet species living in West Africa. As it is widely distributed and common, it is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List.[1]

Pardine genet
Pardine Genet at Wingham Wildlife Park
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Carnivora
Suborder: Feliformia
Family: Viverridae
Genus: Genetta
Species:
G. pardina
Binomial name
Genetta pardina
Pardine Genet area
Pardine genet range
Synonyms
  • Genetta amer Gray, 1843[2]
  • Genetta dubia Matschie, 1902
  • Genetta genettoides Temminck, 1853
  • Genetta pantherina Hamilton-Smith, 1842

Characteristics

The pardine genet's fur is yellowish grey with round black spots, which are bigger on the hind legs than on the shoulders. Its head is more reddish, and the muzzle brownish. It has white spots under each eye and below the chin. Its ears are grey. Its tail has six to seven narrow white and six to seven broader black rings. The tip of the tail is black.[3]

Measurements of adult males range from 410 to 553 mm (16.1 to 21.8 in) in head and body with a 390 to 490 cm (150 to 190 in) long tail. Adult females range from 410 to 530 mm (16 to 21 in) in head and body with a 420 to 450 cm (170 to 180 in) long tail.[4]

Distribution and habitat

Pardine genets are distributed from Senegal eastwards to Ghana, where the Volta River is possibly a barrier to dispersal. They live in rainforests, gallery forests, moist woodlands, but also in plantations. They also venture into suburbs.[1]

Ecology and behavior

Pardine genets are solitary, and active at night. They are very adept at climbing trees.[5]

Threats

Major threats to pardine genets are not known.[1] Heads and skins of pardine genets have been recorded in local markets in Benin, where they are used as fetish.[5]

In captivity

Captive pardine genets are currently kept in 4 collections in the UK, Wingham Wildlife Park, All Things Wild, Wild Animal Adventures in Stockton and Wild Discovery in Wrea Green. Napoli Zoo in Italy has also kept them since 2015.[6]

Taxonomy

This pardine genet was considered synonymous with other species of large-spotted genets, namely the Rusty-spotted genet Genetta maculata and the Cape Genet Genetta tigrina, but all three are now each recognised as distinct species.[1]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e Gaubert, P. & Do Linh San, E. (2016). "Genetta pardina". The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN. 2016: e.T136437A45221360. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2016-1.RLTS.T136437A45221360.en. Retrieved 30 October 2018.
  2. ^ Wozencraft, W.C. (2005). "Genetta pardina". In Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M. Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 554–557. ISBN 978-0-8018-8221-0. OCLC 62265494.
  3. ^ Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire, I. (1832). Genette. Genetta. Cuv. Études Zoologiques. Lequien Fils, Paris.
  4. ^ Gaubert, P. and Dunham, A. E. (2013). Genetta pardina Pardine Genet (West African Large-spotted Genet). In: J. Kingdon and M. Hoffmann (eds.) The Mammals of Africa. V. Carnivores, Pangolins, Equids and Rhinoceroses, pp. 237–238. Bloomsbury, London, UK.
  5. ^ a b Djagoun, C. A. M. S., & Gaubert, P. (2009). Small carnivorans from southern Benin: a preliminary assessment of diversity and hunting pressure. Small Carnivore Conservation 40: 1–10.
  6. ^ "ZootierlisteHomepage". 2017. Retrieved 2017-06-29.
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Lontra

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Lutrogale

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Mustelinae

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Paradoxurus

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the Asian palm civet (P. hermaphroditus)

the golden palm civet (P. zeylonensis)

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Zalophus

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Z. californianus: California sea lion

Z. japonicus: Japanese sea lion †

Z. wollebaeki: Galápagos sea lion

Extant Carnivora species

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