Paddy Glynn

Patrick McMahon Glynn KC (25 August 1855 – 28 October 1931) was an Australian lawyer and politician. He served in the House of Representatives from 1901 to 1919, and was a government minister under three prime ministers, as Attorney-General (1909–1910), Minister for External Affairs (1913–1914) and Minister for Home and Territories (1917–1920). Prior to entering federal politics, Glynn was involved in the drafting of the Constitution of Australia. Born in Ireland, he arrived in Australia in 1880 and served three terms in the South Australian House of Assembly, as well as a brief stint as Attorney-General of South Australia.


Paddy Glynn

Paddy Glynn 1903
Minister for Home and Territories
In office
17 February 1917 – 3 February 1920
Prime MinisterBilly Hughes
Preceded byFred Bamford
Succeeded byAlexander Poynton
Minister for External Affairs
In office
24 June 1913 – 17 September 1914
Prime MinisterJoseph Cook
Preceded byJosiah Thomas
Succeeded byJohn Arthur
Attorney-General of Australia
In office
2 June 1909 – 29 April 1910
Prime MinisterAlfred Deakin
Preceded byBilly Hughes
Succeeded byBilly Hughes
Member of the Australian Parliament
for Angas
In office
16 December 1903 – 13 December 1919
Preceded byNew seat
Succeeded byMoses Gabb
Member of the Australian Parliament
for South Australia
In office
30 March 1901 – 16 December 1903
Preceded byNew seat
Succeeded byDivision abolished
Personal details
Born25 August 1855
Gort, County Galway, Ireland
Died28 October 1931 (aged 76)
North Adelaide, South Australia
NationalityAustralian
Political partyFree Trade (1901–06)
Anti-Socialist (1906–09)
Liberal (1909–17)
Nationalist (1917–19)
Spouse(s)
Abigail Dynon
(m. 1897; wid. 1930)
Alma materTrinity College, Dublin
OccupationBarrister

Early life

Glynn was born in Gort, County Galway, Ireland and educated at the French College, Blackrock and Trinity College, Dublin. Glynn graduated with a BA and LLB, and was the medallist for Oratory at the Law Students Debating Society of Ireland in 1880. The same year saw Glynn immigrate to Australia.

Glynn was admitted to the Victorian bar. His time in Victoria was not a success and in 1882 he moved to Kapunda, South Australia to open a branch of an Adelaide-based law firm. His success in Kapunda allowed him to open his own law firm in Adelaide and involve himself in the political sphere. He also edited for some time the Kapunda Herald.

South Australian politics

Glynn served as president of the South Australian branch of the Irish National League and helped found the South Australian Land Nationalisation Society. His community profile assisted him in his election to the South Australian House of Assembly as the member for Light in 1887. As an advocate of free trade, Glynn was considered a conservative but his support of progressive issues like female suffrage and land nationalisation isolated him from his conservative colleagues.

Glynn was defeated at the 1890 election and stood unsuccessfully for Light again at the 1893 election but returned to South Australian colonial politics in 1895 as the member for North Adelaide. With this victory, he became the first person in Australia to be elected under adult suffrage (whereby females had the right to vote). He was defeated a year later at the 1896 election, however, he won the 1897 North Adelaide by-election, serving until 1901. He briefly served as Attorney-General of South Australia in 1899.

Constitutional convention

Patrick Glynn1
Glynn in 1898

Glynn was a member of the Convention that framed the Australian Commonwealth constitution in 1897–98. He was regarded as one of the ablest authorities in Australia on constitutional law. He made major contributions to Murray River water rights, free trade, standardising rail gauges and universal suffrage. He also contributed a reference to God in the preamble to the Australian Constitution, and helped found the Free Trade Party, one of the major parties in early twentieth-century Australian politics.

Federal politics

First federal election

PaddyGlynn1900s
Glynn in profile

In the lead up to the inaugural federal election, Glynn acted as the informal deputy leader of the Free Trade Party and managed the Free Trade election campaigns in South Australia and Western Australia, while Free Trade leader George Reid oversaw the rest of Australia.[1] As a result, Glynn was not only comfortably elected to the single statewide Division of South Australia but, together with Reid, he is said to have "created Australia's first national political campaign."

Government minister

At the 1903 election, the statewide constituency was abolished and Glynn was returned unopposed in the Division of Angas. He was re-elected on five further occasions, and was unopposed at three consecutive elections (1910, 1913 and 1914).

Despite his ties with Reid, Glynn was not offered a place in the Reid Government (1904–1905). He joined the new Liberal Party after the 1909 "fusion" with the Protectionists, and subsequently served as Attorney-General under Alfred Deakin from 1909 to 1910. He returned to ministerial office in 1913 as Minister for External Affairs in the Cook Government, holding the position until the government's defeat at the 1914 election. In 1917, the Liberals merged with Prime Minister Billy Hughes' National Labor Party, forming the Nationalist Party. Glynn's final ministerial post was as Minister for Home and Territories from 1917 until his defeat at the 1919 election. In that capacity he handled the Darwin rebellion of 1918.

Later life

Patrick McMahon Glynn (cropped)
Glynn in later life

Glynn retired from politics in 1919, and died at North Adelaide in 1931. He married Abigail Dynon, who predeceased him, and was survived by two sons and four daughters. He was a fine Shakespearian scholar; several of his literary papers were published, as were also various legal and political pamphlets.

See also

Citations and references

Citations
  1. ^ McGinn, W. (1989) George Reid, Melbourne University Press, Melbourne.
References
  • McGinn, W.G. (1989). George Reid. Melbourne University Press, Melbourne. ISBN 0-522-84373-5.
  • Simms (ed.), M. (2001). 1901: The forgotton election. University of Queensland Press, Brisbane. ISBN 0-7022-3302-1.CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link)
  • O'Collins, G. (1983). "Glynn, Patrick McMahon (Paddy) (1855–1931)". Australian Dictionary of Biography, Volume 9. MUP. pp. 30–32. ISSN 1833-7538.
Political offices
Preceded by
Billy Hughes
Attorney-General
1909–1910
Succeeded by
Billy Hughes
Preceded by
Josiah Thomas
Minister for External Affairs
1913–1914
Succeeded by
John Arthur
Preceded by
Fred Bamford
Minister for Home and Territories
1917–1920
Succeeded by
Alexander Poynton
Parliament of Australia
New division Member for South Australia
1901–1903
Served alongside: Batchelor, Bonython,
Holder, Kingston, Poynton, Solomon
Divided into single-
member divisions
New division Member for Angas
1903–1919
Succeeded by
Moses Gabb
1901 Australian federal election

Federal elections for the inaugural Parliament of Australia were held in Australia on Friday 29 March and Saturday 30 March 1901. The elections followed Federation and the establishment of the Commonwealth of Australia on 1 January 1901. All 75 seats in the Australian House of Representatives, six of which were uncontested, as well as all 36 seats in the Australian Senate, were up for election.

After the initial confusion of the Hopetoun Blunder, the first Prime Minister of Australia, Edmund Barton, went into the inaugural 1901 federal election as the appointed head of a Protectionist Party caretaker government. While the Protectionists came first on votes and seats, they fell short of a majority. The incumbent government remained in office with the parliamentary support of the Labour Party, who held the balance of power, while the Free Trade Party formed the opposition. A few months prior to the 1903 election, Barton resigned to become a founding member of the High Court of Australia, and was replaced by Alfred Deakin.

Then Prime Minister Edmund Barton entered parliament at this election, as did six future Prime Ministers - Alfred Deakin, Chris Watson, George Reid, Joseph Cook, Andrew Fisher, and Billy Hughes - and future opposition leader Frank Tudor.

1903 Australian federal election

Federal elections were held in Australia on 16 December 1903. All 75 seats in the House of Representatives, and 19 of the 36 seats in the Senate were up for election. The incumbent Protectionist Party minority government led by Prime Minister Alfred Deakin retained the most House of Representatives seats of the three parties and retained government with the parliamentary support of the Labour Party led by Chris Watson. The Free Trade Party led by George Reid remained in opposition.

The election outcome saw a finely balanced House of Representatives, with the three parties each holding around a third of seats − the Protectionists on 26 (−5), the Free Traders on 24 (−4) and Labour on 22 (+7). This term of parliament saw no changes in any party leadership but did see very significant and prolonged debates on contentious issues − the Protectionist minority government fell in April 1904 to Labour, while the Labour minority government fell in August 1904 to the Free Traders, while the Free Trader minority government fell in July 1905 back to the Protectionists, which continued until the 1906 election and beyond. The Free Traders remained in opposition throughout this eventful period with the exception of Labour forming the opposition for the first time during the period of the Free Trader minority government. Additionally, the Watson government was the world's first Labour Party government at a national level.

Despite a break in prime ministerships in 1904-05 and 1908-09, this is the first of three consecutive elections in which Deakin was the sitting prime minister.

Alexander Poynton

Alexander Poynton, OBE, (8 August 1853 – 9 January 1935) was an Australian politician. He was a member of the South Australian House of Assembly from 1893 to 1901, representing Flinders. He was an inaugural member of the Australian House of Representatives from 1901, representing South Australia until 1903 and Grey thereafter until his defeat in 1922.

Cook Ministry

The Cook Ministry (Commonwealth Liberal) was the 10th ministry of the Government of Australia. It was led by the country's 6th Prime Minister, Joseph Cook. The Cook Ministry succeeded the Second Fisher Ministry, which dissolved on 24 June 1913 following the federal election that took place in May which saw the Commonwealth Liberals defeat Andrew Fisher's Labor Party - albeit with a one-seat majority. The ministry was replaced by the Third Fisher Ministry on 17 September 1914 following the federal election that took place on 5 September which saw Labor defeat the Commonwealth Liberals.

Division of South Australia

The Division of South Australia was an Australian electoral division covering South Australia. The seven-member statewide seat existed from the inaugural 1901 election until the 1903 election. Each elector cast seven votes. Unlike most of the other states, South Australia had not been split into individual single-member electorates. The other exception was the five-member Division of Tasmania. The statewide seats were abolished at a redistribution conducted two months prior to the 1903 election and were subsequently replaced with single-member divisions, one per displaced member, with each elector now casting a single vote.

Electoral district of North Adelaide

North Adelaide was an electoral district of the House of Assembly in the Australian state of South Australia from 1875 to 1902 and again from 1915 to 1938.North Adelaide was also the name of an electoral district of the unicameral South Australian Legislative Council from 1851 until its abolition in 1857, John Bentham Neales being the elected member.

The North Adelaide area is currently fairly safe to safe Liberal and is represented in the seat of Adelaide.

Electoral results for the Division of Angas (1903–34)

This is a list of electoral results for the Division of Angas in Australian federal elections from the division's creation in 1903 until its abolition in 1934.

Ephraim Ellis

Ephraim Todd Ellis (born February 23, 1985) is a Canadian actor. He is known for playing Rick Murray in the television show Degrassi: The Next Generation

After appearing on Degrassi, he also appeared in the Family series Naturally, Sadie as Vince in the episodes "Social Climbers", "Unusual Suspects", "Pack of Lies", and "Forest for the Trees". In 2005 he played the role of Riley Kineston on Zixx: Level 2 and in 2007–2009 he played Riley again on Zixx: Level 3. He also appeared in seasons 4 and 5 of the APTN show renegadepress.com in the role of Dylan.

He also played the character Danny on the television show Falcon Beach, which aired on Global.

Ephraim began acting while studying at Earl Haig Secondary School in Toronto, Ontario. He served as a producer for the school's annual film festival, Zoom. His other television credits include an appearance in the television series Zoe Busiek: Wild Card for Lifetime. He has also starred in the Canadian Film Centre's 2004 feature White Out, which was entered in the Toronto International Film Festival.

In 2009, he played Eli Keller on Family Biz in Ottawa, Ontario. The show premiere was aired on March 6, 2009, on YTV and ended after 26 episodes. The show is aimed at a family audience.Ephraim also appeared in several episodes of Murdoch Mysteries, Season 4 as reporter Paddy Glynn.

Ephraim appeared in the web series Seth On Survival, as renowned supernatural survivologist Seth Greening.

In 2018, Ellis was part of Drake's music video for I'm Upset, which took place during a Degrassi reunion, reprising his role as Rick.

Fourth Hughes Ministry

The Fourth Hughes Ministry was the fifteenth Australian Commonwealth ministry, and ran from 5 May 1917 to 3 February 1920.Nationalist Party of Australia

Glynn (surname)

Glynn is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Bill Glynn (baseball) (1925–2013), Major League Baseball player

Brian Glynn (born 1967), retired National Hockey League player

Camillus Glynn (born 1941), Irish politician

Carlin Glynn (born 1940), American actress

Derek Glynn (born 1983), Irish footballer

Dominic Glynn (born 1960), British composer

Eleanor Glynn (born 1986), British model

Gene Glynn, American baseball player and coach

Henry Richard Glynn (1768-1856), British admiral

Ian Glynn (born 1928), British biologist

James Glynn (1800–1871), U.S. Navy officer

James P. Glynn (1867-1930), U.S. congressman from Connecticut

Jeanne Glynn (1932-2007), television screenwriter

John Glynn (1722–1779), English lawyer and Member of Parliament

Martin H. Glynn (1871-1924), American politician

Mary Ann Glynn, American academic

Niall Glynn (born 1977) Kilcar native. Cousin of Eighneachan T. Murray

Paddy Glynn (1855-1931), Australian Attorney General

Paul Glynn (born 1928), Australian priest

Thomas Robinson Glynn (1841–1931), British physician

Joseph Glynn

Sir Joseph Aloysius Glynn (16 August 1869 – 6 March 1951) was an Irish politician, knight and historian.Glynn was the son of John McMahon Glynn of Gort, County Galway. His older brother Paddy Glynn emigrated to Australia and became a government minister. Educated at Blackrock College, he became a solicitor in 1890. Nine years later he was elected to Galway County Council and acted as its chairman from 1902 to 1912.

Glynn served as chairman of the Natural Insurance Commissioners from 1911 to 1933. He was knighted in 1915. While President of the Irish Council of St. Vincent de Paul, he was admitted to the Order of St. Gregory the Great. He was also a leading member of An Ríoghacht.He married Bride Donnellan, daughter of John O'Neil Donnellon, in 1894. After her death in 1921, he married her younger sister, Kate, in 1923. He died in 1951 in Dublin, aged 82.

Josiah Thomas

Josiah Thomas (28 April 1863 – 5 February 1933) was an Australian politician. He was elected to the House of Representatives at the inaugural 1901 federal election, representing the Labor Party. Thomas served as a minister in Andrew Fisher's first two governments, as Postmaster-General (1908–1909, 1910–1911) and Minister for External Affairs (1911–1913). He joined the Nationalist Party after the 1916 Labor split and transferred to the Senate at the 1917 election, serving as a Senator for New South Wales from 1917 to 1923 and from 1925 to 1929.

List of South Australian House of Assembly by-elections

This is a list of by-elections and scheduled by-elections for the South Australian House of Assembly.

A by-election may be held when a member's seat becomes vacant through resignation, death or some other reasons. These vacancies are called casual vacancies.

Gains for Labor are highlighted in red; for Liberal and its predecessors in blue; and others in grey.

Members of the South Australian House of Assembly, 1887–1890

This is a list of members of the South Australian House of Assembly from 1887 to 1890, as elected at the 1887 colonial election:

1 Gumeracha MHA Robert Dalrymple Ross died on 27 December 1887. Lancelot Stirling won the resulting by-election on 12 May 1888.

2 Victoria MHA Daniel Livingston died on 30 September 1888. John James Osman won the resulting by-election on 1 November.

3 Stanley MHA Edward William Hawker resigned on 28 May 1889. Peter Paul Gillen won the resulting by-election on 25 June.

Members of the South Australian House of Assembly, 1893–1896

This is a list of members of the South Australian House of Assembly from 1893 to 1896, as elected at the 1893 colonial election:

1 East Torrens MHA Thomas Playford resigned on 17 April 1894. David Packham won the resulting by-election on 19 May.

2 North Adelaide MHA George Charles Hawker died on 21 May 1895. Paddy Glynn won the resulting by-election on 8 June.

Members of the South Australian House of Assembly, 1896–1899

This is a list of members of the South Australian House of Assembly from 1896 to 1899, as elected at the 1896 colonial election:

1 Gumeracha NDL MHA Charles Willcox resigned on 18 June 1896 following concerns about his status as a government contractor. He was declared by the Court of Disputed Returns to have been incapable of being elected on 19 June. William Richard Randell, who Willcox had defeated at the 1896 election, won the resulting by-election on 10 July.

2 Stanley MHA Peter Paul Gillen died on 22 September 1896. William Patrick Cummins won the resulting by-election on 17 October.

3 North Adelaide NDL MHA Arthur Harrold resigned on 2 April 1897. NDL candidate Paddy Glynn won the resulting by-election on 22 May.

4 Albert NDL MHA George Ash died on 23 February 1897. Archibald Peake won the resulting by-election on 22 May, but was unseated by the Court of Disputed Returns on 3 July following allegations of electoral irregularities in the booth at Holder. Peake won a second by-election on 31 July.

5 North Adelaide MHA Richard Wood was expelled from the Labor Party in November 1897 and served out his term as an independent.

6 East Adelaide Labor MHA John McPherson died on 13 December 1897. Labor candidate James Hutchison won the resulting by-election on 22 January 1898.

7 Mount Barker MHA John Cockburn resigned on 20 April 1898. Charles Dumas won the resulting by-election on 14 May.

Members of the South Australian House of Assembly, 1899–1902

This is a list of members of the South Australian House of Assembly from 1899 to 1902, as elected at the 1899 colonial election:The Federation of Australia occurred on 1 January 1901, resulting in South Australia changing from a colony to a state of the new nation during this term of parliament. Seven members of the House of Assembly were elected to the new Parliament of Australia at the 1901 federal election, resulting in by-elections for their state seats.

1 Encounter Bay MHA Charles Tucker was unseated by the Court of Disputed Returns on 6 July 1899. He was re-elected at the resulting by-election on 29 July.

2 West Adelaide MHA Charles Kingston resigned on 7 February 1900. Bill Denny won the resulting by-election on 17 March.

3 Northern Territory MHA Walter Griffiths died on 4 September 1900. Charles Edward Herbert won the resulting by-election on 20 October.

4 West Adelaide MHA Lee Batchelor vacated his seat when he was seated in the first Parliament of Australia on 9 May 1901. Francis Bernard Keogh won the resulting by-election on 1 June.

5 North Adelaide MHA Paddy Glynn vacated his seat when he was seated in the first Parliament of Australia on 9 May 1901. Hugh Robert Dixson won the resulting by-election on 1 June.

6 Barossa MHA John Downer vacated his seat when he was seated in the first Parliament of Australia on 9 May 1901. E. H. Coombe won the resulting by-election on 8 June.

7 Burra MHA Frederick Holder vacated his seat when he was seated in the first Parliament of Australia on 9 May 1901. William Russell won the resulting by-election on 8 June.

8 Gumeracha MHA Thomas Playford vacated his seat when he was seated in the first Parliament of Australia on 9 May 1901. William Jamieson won the resulting by-election on 1 June.

9 Flinders MHA Alexander Poynton vacated his seat when he was seated in the first Parliament of Australia on 9 May 1901. William Tennant Mortlock won the resulting by-election on 8 June.

10 Northern Territory MHA Vaiben Louis Solomon vacated his seat when he was seated in the first Parliament of Australia on 9 May 1901. Samuel James Mitchell won the resulting by-election on 15 June.

11 Wallaroo MHA Henry Allerdale Grainger resigned on 30 May 1901. John Verran won the resulting by-election on 22 June.

12 West Torrens MHA Frank Hourigan died on 1 December 1901. No by-election was held before the 1902 election.

Moses Gabb

Joel Moses Gabb (21 November 1882 – 6 March 1951) was an Australian politician. He was a member of the Australian House of Representatives from 1919 to 1934, representing the electorate of Angas. He represented the Australian Labor Party until resigning during the 1931 Labor split; however, he did not join the United Australia Party along with the other dissident MPs, and instead remained in parliament as an independent.

Third Hughes Ministry

The Third Hughes Ministry (Nationalist) was the 14th ministry of the Government of Australia. It was led by the country's 7th Prime Minister, Billy Hughes. The Third Hughes Ministry succeeded the Second Hughes Ministry, which dissolved on 17 February 1917 after the governing National Labor Party merged with the Commonwealth Liberal Party to form the Nationalist Party. The National Labor Party itself formed as a consequence of the split that took place within the then-governing Labor Party over the issue of conscription. The ministry was replaced by the Fourth Hughes Ministry on 5 May 1917 following the federal election that took place in early May.

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