PAL region

The PAL region is a television publication territory that covers most of Asia, Africa, Europe, South America and Oceania. It is so named because of the PAL (Phase Alternating Line) television standard traditionally used in those regions, as opposed to the NTSC standard traditionally used in Japan and nearly all of North America.

PAL-NTSC-SECAM
Television system by country. Countries using the PAL system are shown in blue.

Release area

The scope of the PAL region varies with systems and publishers. The following countries and areas are normally included in a PAL region release:

Countries with Limited recognition

60 Hz operation

During the mid-1990s, the practice of modifying consoles such as the Super NES and Mega Drive to allow 60 Hz operation became somewhat common among PAL gamers, due to the rise in NTSC/60 Hz capable PAL TVs and the relatively simple nature of the modifications. Beginning with the Amiga CD32, which introduced more powerful hardware, developers had the ability to output at full PAL resolution without borders or stretching, although games still typically ran slower and all ran at 50 Hz. Beginning with the Dreamcast and continuing through the sixth generation of consoles, developers began including PAL60 modes in their games. Games that run at PAL60 are produced with the same colour encoding system as 50 Hz PAL signals, but with the NTSC resolution and field rate of 60 Hz, providing an identical gaming experience to their NTSC counterparts, however some games, such as Tekken 4 and Tekken 5, will actually use the NTSC color mode when in 60 Hz mode; these games will appear in black and white on PAL-only televisions.

Criticism of PAL region video games

Games ported to PAL have historically been known for having game speed and frame rates inferior to their NTSC counterparts. Since the NTSC standard is 60 fields/30 frames per second but PAL is 50 fields/25 frames per second, games were typically slowed by approximately 16.7% in order to avoid timing problems or unfeasible code changes. FMV rendered and encoded at 30 frames per second by the Japanese/US (NTSC) developers was often down-sampled to 25 frames per second for PAL release—usually by means of 3:2 pull-down, resulting in motion judder. In addition to this, PAL's increased resolution was not utilised during conversion, creating a pseudo letterbox effect with borders top and bottom, leaving the graphics with a slightly squashed look due to an incorrect aspect ratio caused by the borders. This was especially prevalent during previous generations when 2D graphics were used almost exclusively. The gameplay of many games with an emphasis on speed, such as the original Sonic The Hedgehog for the Mega Drive, suffered in their PAL incarnations.

Despite the possibility and popularity of 60 Hz PAL games, many high-profile games, particularly for the PlayStation 2 console, were released in 50 Hz-only versions. Square Enix have long been criticised by PAL gamers for their poor PAL conversions. Final Fantasy X runs in 50 Hz mode only, and 16.7% slower and bordered that while prevalent in previous generations was considered inexcusable at the time of release.[1] In stark contrast, the Dreamcast was the first system to feature PAL60, and the overwhelming majority of PAL games offered 50 and 60 Hz modes with no slowdown. The Xbox too featured a system-wide PAL60 option in the Dashboard, with almost every game supporting PAL60. Seventh generation PAL consoles Xbox 360, PlayStation 3 and Wii also feature system-wide 60 Hz support.

Nintendo's Virtual Console service has been criticized due to PAL games running in 50 Hz only, despite the ability to run in 60 Hz mode.[2]

In recent years, few PAL releases have lacked the standard PAL mode and offered 60 Hz only, notably Metroid Prime 2: Echoes and Geist for the Nintendo GameCube, and Dead or Alive 4 for the Xbox 360. As of the eighth generation, consoles such as the Wii U, PlayStation 4, Xbox One and Nintendo Switch have all games exclusively in 60 Hz, with 50 Hz only being used for video playback and, in the Wii U's case, backwards compatibility with Wii and Virtual Console games.

See also

References

  1. ^ "GamesRadar+". computerandvideogames.com.
  2. ^ "PAL Virtual Console games slow and bordered - VideoGamer.com". videogamer.com.
Cabela's Dangerous Hunts 2009

Cabela's Dangerous Hunts 2009 (known as Cabela's Dangerous Adventures in PAL region) is a hunting video game published by Activision for the PlayStation 2, PlayStation 3, Wii, and Xbox 360 video game consoles. It was released in the United States on September 23, 2008.

List of Cabela's video games

This is a list of hunting video games developed in conjunction with Cabela's for a variety of gaming platforms.

List of DSiWare games (PAL region)

This is a list of games and applications for the Nintendo DSi handheld game console available for download via the DSi Shop in the PAL region.

List of Instant Game Collection games (PAL region)

This is a list of Instant Game Collection games which have been available to PlayStation Plus members in the PAL region covering Europe, the Middle East, South Asia, Africa and Oceania.

There are currently 630 games on this list.

List of PS one Classics (PAL region)

There are 147 games available (excluding 17 games that have been removed from the PSN).

List of Tales media

The Tales series, known in Japan as the Tales of series (「テイルズ オブ」シリーズ, "Teiruzu Obu" Shirīzu), is a franchise of fantasy Japanese role-playing video games published by Bandai Namco Games (formerly Namco), and developed by its subsidiary, Namco Tales Studio (formerly Wolf Team) until 2011 and presently by Bandai Namco. First begun in 1995 with the development and release of Tales of Phantasia for the Super Famicom, the series currently spans fifteen main titles, multiple spin-off games and supplementary media in the form of manga series, anime series, and audio dramas.

While entries in the series generally stand independent of each other with different characters and stories, they are commonly linked by their gameplay, themes and high fantasy settings. Most of the main Tales games have been localized for North America and Europe, although almost all of the spinoff titles have not been released abroad. While generally seen as a niche series in English speaking regions, Tales is considered a high-profile property in Japan, just behind other series such as Final Fantasy and Dragon Quest. As of December 2013, the series has sold 16 million units worldwide.

List of Virtual Console games for Nintendo 3DS (PAL region)

The following is the complete list of the 197 Virtual Console titles that have been released for the Nintendo 3DS in the PAL region (Europe and Australia) sorted by system and release dates.

List of WiiWare games (PAL region)

The following is the complete list of the WiiWare titles available for the Wii in the PAL region as shown within the WiiWare section of the Wii Shop Channel. There are currently 281 games in Europe and 209 games in Australia. New games (if any) are added weekly on Thursdays (Fridays until June 2011).

It has been announced on September 29, 2017 that Nintendo plans to discontinue the Wii Shop Channel by January 31, 2019, with the purchase of Wii Points for new games ended on March 26, 2018.

NASCAR 08

NASCAR 08 is the eleventh installment of the EA Sports NASCAR series. It was developed by EA Tiburon and released for PlayStation 2, PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360. This is the earliest that EA has released a NASCAR game. It also marks the first time the original Xbox has been excluded from the NASCAR lineup since NASCAR 2001.

Tony Stewart is on the cover marking his third appearance on the cover of an EA Sports NASCAR game. The cover in the PAL region features Juan Pablo Montoya (as Montoya returns to EA Sports cover athlete since F1 Career Challenge). NASCAR's new Car of Tomorrow as well as the current car are present in the game, although the Car of Tomorrow is generic (no separate manufacturers). ESPN's NASCAR coverage is also integrated into the game. Crew chief dialogue for the PS3 and 360 versions of the game was recorded by Chad Knaus. The Whelen Modified Tour is not included in the PS3 and 360 versions of the game, but is present in the PS2 version.

PlayStation Portable

The PlayStation Portable (PSP) is a handheld game console that was developed by Sony Computer Entertainment and competed with the Nintendo DS as part of the seventh generation of video-game consoles. Development of the handheld console was announced during E3 2003 and it was unveiled on May 11, 2004, at a Sony press conference before the next E3. The system was released in Japan on December 12, 2004; in North America on March 24, 2005; and in the PAL region on September 1, 2005.

The PSP was the most powerful portable console when it was introduced. It was the first real competitor of Nintendo's handheld consoles after many challengers, such as SNK's Neo Geo Pocket and Nokia's N-Gage, had failed. Its advanced graphics made the PSP a popular mobile-entertainment device, which can connect to the PlayStation 2 (PS2) and PlayStation 3 (PS3) games consoles, computers running Microsoft Windows and Apple Macintosh software, other PSPs and the Internet. The PSP is the only handheld console to use an optical disc format – Universal Media Disc (UMD) – as its primary storage medium. It was received positively by most video-game critics and sold 76 million units by 2012.

Several models of the console were released. The PSP line was succeeded by the PlayStation Vita, which was released in December 2011 in Japan and worldwide in February 2012. The Vita has backward compatibility with many PSP games that were released on the PlayStation Network through the PlayStation Store, which became the main method of purchasing PSP games after Sony shut down access to the PlayStation Store from PSPs on March 31, 2016. Hardware shipments ended worldwide in 2014; the PSP sold 80 million units during its 10-year lifetime. Production of UMDs ended when the last Japanese factory making them closed in late 2016.

Pokémon Rumble Blast

Pokémon Rumble Blast, known in the PAL region as Super Pokémon Rumble and known in Japan as Super Pokémon Scramble (スーパーポケモンスクランブル, Supa Pokémon Sukuranburu), is an action beat 'em up video game in the Pokémon series for the Nintendo 3DS. The game was released in Japan on August 11, 2011, in North America on October 24, 2011 and in Europe on December 2, 2011. It is a successor to the 2009 WiiWare release Pokémon Rumble.

The game was re-released as a Nintendo eShop digital download for the PAL region on November 29, 2012 and in North America on December 20, 2012.

Super Bomberman 3

Super Bomberman 3 (スーパーボンバーマン3, Sūpā Bonbāman Surī) is a game released for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System in 1995. It is the third game in the Bomberman series for the system. Just like Fifa International Soccer, up to five players can play at the same time.The game was released in Japan and the PAL region, but not in North America.

Super Scope

The Super Scope, sold as the Nintendo Scope in Europe and Australia, is a first party light gun peripheral for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System. The successor to the NES Zapper, the Super Scope was released in North America and the PAL region in 1992, followed by a limited release in Japan in 1993 due to a lack of consumer demand. The peripheral consists of two devices: the wireless light gun itself, called the Transmitter, and a Receiver that connects to the second controller port of the Super NES console. The Transmitter has two action buttons, a pause button, a power switch and is powered by six AA batteries.

Tales of Xillia

Tales of Xillia (Japanese: テイルズ オブ エクシリア, Hepburn: Teiruzu Obu Ekushiria) is a Japanese role-playing game released exclusively for the PlayStation 3. It is the thirteenth core product of the Tales series and is developed by Namco Tales Studio with Namco Bandai Games as the publisher. The game was released in Japan on September 7, 2011 and was localized in North America and PAL region in August 2013. The game takes place in a fictional world called Rieze Maxia where humans and ethereal spirits live in harmony. It follows Jude Mathis and Milla Maxwell who elude government officials after sabotaging a weapon of mass destruction known as the Lance of Kresnik. The plot's central theme is Yuruginaki shinnen no RPG (揺るぎなき信念のRPG, lit. "RPG of Unwavering Convictions").

Tales of Xillia's reception in Japan was highly positive. At the time of its release, it was the most preordered Tales game in the series and sold half a million copies in a week; the game also won awards from Sony and Famitsu. The English localization received positive reception for its battle system, neutral to positive reviews for its plot and characters, and criticism for the map designs. The sequel, Tales of Xillia 2, was released in November 2012 in Japan and in August 2014 in North America and PAL region.

Virtual Console

Virtual Console (バーチャルコンソール, Bācharu Konsōru), also abbreviated as VC, is a line of downloadable video games (mostly unaltered) for Nintendo's Wii and Wii U home gaming consoles and the Nintendo 3DS portable gaming console.

The Virtual Console lineup consists of titles originally released on past home and handheld consoles. These titles are run in their original forms through software emulation (excluding GBA titles on 3DS), and can be purchased from the Wii Shop Channel or Nintendo eShop for between 500 and 1200 Wii Points (Wii), US$2.99 and US$6.99 (3DS) and US$4.99 and US$9.99 (Wii U) depending on system, rarity, and/or demand. Virtual Console's library of past games currently consists of titles originating from the Nintendo Entertainment System, Super NES, Game Boy, Game Boy Color, Nintendo 64, Game Boy Advance, and Nintendo DS, as well as Sega's Master System and Genesis/Mega Drive, NEC's TurboGrafx-16, and SNK's Neo Geo AES. The service for the Wii also included games for platforms that were known only in select regions, such as the Commodore 64 (Europe and North America) and MSX (Japan), as well as Virtual Console Arcade, which allowed players to download video arcade games. Virtual Console titles have been downloaded over ten million times. The sale of past games through the Virtual Console is one of Nintendo's reasons for opposing software piracy of old console games.

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