Oxford Dictionaries

Oxford Dictionaries, formerly Oxford Dictionaries Online (ODO), is a collection of dictionary websites produced by Oxford University Press (OUP), the publishing house of the University of Oxford, which also publishes a number of print dictionaries, among other works.

The collection includes bilingual dictionaries between English and a variety of languages (Greek, Gujarati, Hindi, Indonesian, Latvian, Malay, Northern Sotho, Romanian, Southern Quechua, Spanish, Swahili, Tajik, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tok Pisin, Tswana, Turkmen, Urdu, Xhosa, and Zulu) known as Oxford Living Dictionaries, which are provided free of charge, as well as Oxford Dictionaries Premium, a subscription service. Oxford Living Dictionaries previously included English and Spanish dictionaries, which have been moved to Lexico, a collaboration between Dictionary.com and OUP.[1] Oxford Dictionaries' definitions appear in Google definition search, the Dictionary application on macOS, etc., licensed through Oxford Dictionaries API.[2][3]

Oxford Dictionaries
Oxford Dictionaries logo
Type of site
Dictionary
Available in
OwnerOxford University Press
Websitelanguages.oup.com
CommercialYes
Launched2010
Lexico logo
Lexico logo

History

Hosted under oxforddictionaries.com, Oxford Dictionaries Online was launched in 2010.[4] Buyers of the third edition of the Oxford Dictionary of English, also published in 2010, were granted a one-year subscription to the website's subscription content.[5] The website's English dictionaries incorporated content of the Oxford Dictionary of English, New Oxford American Dictionary, Oxford Thesaurus of English, and Oxford American Writer’s Thesaurus. It also provided a Spanish monolingual dictionary and bilingual dictionaries between English and several languages.[6] As of June 2014, it was updated every three months.[7]

In 2014, OUP launched Oxford Global Languages, an initiative to build lexical resources (bilingual dictionaries) of the world's languages, starting with Zulu and Northern Sotho online dictionaries released in 2015.[8] In 2016, the free content of Oxford Dictionaries Online was rebranded as Oxford Living Dictionaries, and the subscription content was moved to a different subdomain, premium.oxforddictionaries.com.[9]

In June 2019, the free-of-charge monolingual dictionaries of English and Spanish were moved to Lexico.com, a collaboration between OUP and Dictionary.com. The Oxford Living Dictionaries in other languages and the subscription content of Oxford Dictionaries are still offered under oxforddictionaries.com. The offer of the US English dictionary on Oxford Living Dictionaries was completely terminated, as Lexico only hosts UK English and Spanish dictionaries.[1] "Lexico" was itself a brand of the owner company of Dictionary.com, Lexico Publishing Group, LLC.[10]

Comparison with the Oxford English Dictionary

The website of the Oxford English Dictionary described its difference from Oxford Dictionaries as follows:

The dictionary content in Oxford Dictionaries focuses on current English and includes modern meanings and uses of words. Where words have more than one meaning, the most important and common meanings in modern English are given first, and less common and more specialist or technical uses are listed below. The OED, on the other hand, is a historical dictionary and it forms a record of all the core words and meanings in English over more than 1,000 years, from Old English to the present day, and including many obsolete and historical terms. Meanings are ordered chronologically in the OED, according to when they were first recorded in English ...[11]

References

  1. ^ a b "Lexico.com FAQS". Oxford Dictionaries. Oxford University Press. Retrieved 11 June 2019.
  2. ^ "Oxford Dictionaries API". Oxford University Press. Retrieved 22 June 2019.
  3. ^ Bell, Karissa (4 December 2015). "Why Siri showed a definition of b*tch that offended everyone". Mashable. Retrieved 22 June 2019.
  4. ^ "Oxford University Press Chooses PubFactory to Develop Oxford English Dictionary". PubFactory. 4 August 2010. Retrieved 11 June 2019.
  5. ^ ""Vuvuzela," "staycation" among 2,000 words added to Oxford Dictionary". The Independent. 20 August 2010. Retrieved 11 June 2019.
  6. ^ "Oxford Dictionaries content help". Oxford Dictionaries. Oxford University Press. Archived from the original on 27 August 2016.
  7. ^ Harrison, Emma (19 June 2014). "Oxford dictionaries: Demise of the printed editions?". BBC News. Retrieved 11 June 2019.
  8. ^ "Oxford Global Languages". Oxford Dictionaries. Oxford University Press. Retrieved 11 June 2019.
  9. ^ "Help". Oxford Living Dictionaries. Oxford University Press. Archived from the original on 25 September 2016.
  10. ^ Auchard, Eric (4 July 2008). "Ask.com closes acquisition of Dictionary.com". Reuters. Retrieved 11 June 2019.
  11. ^ "The OED and Oxford Dictionaries". Oxford English Dictionary. Oxford University Press. Archived from the original on 28 February 2018.

External links

American and British English pronunciation differences

Differences in pronunciation between American English (AmE) and British English (BrE) can be divided into

differences in accent (i.e. phoneme inventory and realisation). See differences between General American and Received Pronunciation for the standard accents in the United States and Britain; for information about other accents see regional accents of English speakers.

differences in the pronunciation of individual words in the lexicon (i.e. phoneme distribution). In this article, transcriptions use Received Pronunciation (RP) to represent BrE and General American (GAm) to represent AmE.In the following discussion:

superscript A2 after a word indicates that the BrE pronunciation of the word is a common variant in AmE.

superscript B2 after a word indicates that the AmE pronunciation of the word is a common variant in BrE.

superscript A1 after a word indicates that the pronunciation given as BrE is also the most common variant in AmE.

superscript B1 after a word indicates that the pronunciation given as AmE is also the most common variant in BrE.

Aquarius (astrology)

Aquarius (♒) is the eleventh astrological sign in the Zodiac, originating from the constellation Aquarius. Under the tropical zodiac, the Sun is in the Aquarius sign between about January 21 and about February 20, while under the sidereal Zodiac, the sun is in Aquarius from approximately February 15 to March 14, depending on the leap year.

Bohemian

A Bohemian () is a resident of Bohemia, a region of the Czech Republic or the former Kingdom of Bohemia, a region of the former Crown of Bohemia (lands of the Bohemian Crown). In English, the word "Bohemian" was used to denote the Czech people as well as the Czech language before the word "Czech" became prevalent in the early 20th century.In a separate meaning, "Bohemian" may also denote "a socially unconventional person, especially one who is involved in the arts" according to Oxford Dictionaries Online. (See Bohemianism).

Bro (subculture)

Bro is a subculture of young men who spend time partying with others like themselves. Although the popular image of bro lifestyle is associated with sports apparel and fraternities, it lacks a consistent definition. Most aspects vary regionally such as in California where it overlaps with surf culture. Oxford Dictionaries have noted that bros frequently self-identify with neologisms containing the word "bro" as a prefix or suffix.

Canadian Oxford Dictionary

The Canadian Oxford Dictionary is a dictionary of Canadian English. First published by Oxford University Press Canada in 1998, it became a well-known reference for Canadian English.

The second edition, published in 2004, contains about 300,000 entries, including about 2,200 true Canadianisms. It also provides information on Canadian pronunciation and on Canadian spelling, which has features of both British and American spelling: colour, centre, and travelling, but tire, aluminum and realize.

Compact Oxford English Dictionary of Current English

The Compact Oxford English Dictionary of Current English is a one-volume dictionary published by Oxford University Press. It is intended for a family or upper secondary school readerships. The third edition (revised), published in 2008, has 1,264 pages, somewhat smaller than the Concise Oxford English Dictionary, and is distinct from the "Compact" (single- and two-volume photo-reduced) editions of the multi-volume Oxford English Dictionary.

Democratic republic

A democratic republic is a form of government operating on principles adopted from a republic and a democracy. Rather than being a cross between two entirely separate systems, democratic republics may function on principles shared by both republics and democracies.

Glossary of American terms not widely used in the United Kingdom

This is a list of American words not widely used in the United Kingdom. In Canada and Australia, some of the American terms listed are widespread; however, in some cases, another usage is preferred.

Words with specific American meanings that have different meanings in British English and/or additional meanings common to both dialects (e.g., pants, crib) are to be found at List of words having different meanings in British and American English. When such words are herein used or referenced, they are marked with the flag [DM] (different meaning).

Asterisks (*) denote words and meanings having appreciable (that is, not occasional) currency in British English, but nonetheless distinctive of American English for their relatively greater frequency in American speech and writing. Americanisms are increasingly common in British English, and many that were not widely used some decades ago, are now so (e.g., regular in the sense of "regular coffee").

American spelling is consistently used throughout this article, except when explicitly referencing British terms.

Google Dictionary

Google Dictionary is an online dictionary service of Google that can be accessed by using the "define" operator and other similar phrases in Google Search. It is also available in Google Translate and in the form of an extension for Google Chrome. The dictionary content is licensed from Oxford University Press's OxfordDictionaries.com. It is available in different languages such as English, Spanish and French. The service also contains pronunciation audio, Google Translate, word origin chart, Ngram Viewer, and word games among other features for the English language version. Originally available as a standalone service it was integrated into Google Search with the separate service being discontinued in August 2011.

Microsoft's Bing also provides a similar dictionary service which licences dictionary data from Oxford Dictionaries as well. Apple also licences dictionary data from Oxford for its iOS and macOS products.

List of English words of Korean origin

This is a list of words of Korean origin which have entered into English usage.

List of South African English regionalisms

This is a list of words used in mainstream South African English but not usually found in other dialects of the English language. For internationally common English words of South African origin, see List of English words of Afrikaans origin.

New Oxford American Dictionary

The New Oxford American Dictionary (NOAD) is a single-volume dictionary of American English compiled by American editors at the Oxford University Press.

NOAD is based upon the New Oxford Dictionary of English (NODE), published in the United Kingdom in 1998, although with substantial editing, additional entries, and the inclusion of illustrations. It is based on a corpus linguistics analysis of Oxford's 200 million word database of contemporary American English.

NOAD includes a diacritical respelling scheme to convey pronunciations, as opposed to the Gimson phonemic IPA system that is used in NODE.

Oxford American Dictionary

The Oxford American Dictionary (OAD) is a single-volume dictionary of American English. It was the first dictionary published by the Oxford University Press to be prepared by American lexicographers and editors.

The work was based on the Oxford Paperback Dictionary, published in 1979. It is no longer in print and has been superseded by the New Oxford American Dictionary.

Oxford Classical Dictionary

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (OCD) is generally considered "the best one-volume dictionary on antiquity," an encyclopedic work in English consisting of articles relating to classical antiquity and its civilizations. It was first published in 1949 (OCD1 or OCD), edited by Max Cary with the assistance of H. J. Rose, H. P. Harvey, and Alexander Souter. A second edition followed in 1970 (OCD2), edited by Nicholas G. L. Hammond and H. H. Scullard, and a third edition in 1996 (OCD3), edited by Simon Hornblower and Antony Spawforth. A revised third edition was released in 2003, which is nearly identical to the previous third edition. A fourth edition was published in 2012 (OCD4), edited by Simon Hornblower, Antony Spawforth, and Esther Eidinow. In 2016, a fully digital edition launched online, edited by Sander Goldberg (2013–2017) and Tim Whitmarsh (2018–present). Continuously updated on a monthly basis, this edition incorporates all 6,300 entries from OCD4 (which are being updated on a rolling basis) as well as newly commissioned entries, and features multimedia content and freely accessible maps of the ancient world.The OCD's over 6,400 non-blind articles cover everything from the daily life of the ancient Greeks and Romans to their geography, religion, and their historical figures.

Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium (often abbreviated to ODB) is a three-volume historical dictionary published by the English Oxford University Press. With more than 5,000 entries, it contains comprehensive information in English on topics relating to the Byzantine Empire. It was edited by Alexander Kazhdan, and was first published in 1991. Kazhdan was a professor at Princeton University who became a Senior Research Associate at Dumbarton Oaks, Washington, DC before his death. He contributed to many of the articles in the Dictionary and always signed his initials A.K. at the end of the article to indicate his contribution.

Oxford Dictionary of English

The Oxford Dictionary of English (ODE) is a single-volume English dictionary published by Oxford University Press, first published in 1998 as The New Oxford Dictionary of English (NODE). The word "new" was dropped from the title with the Second Edition in 2003. This dictionary is not based on the Oxford English Dictionary and should not be mistaken for a new or updated version of the OED. It is a completely new dictionary which strives to represent as faithfully as possible the current usage of English words.

The Revised Second Edition contains 355,000 words, phrases, and definitions, including biographical references and thousands of encyclopaedic entries. The Third Edition was published in August 2010, with some new words, including "vuvuzela".

It is currently the largest single-volume English-language dictionary published by Oxford University Press.

Presentation

A presentation is the process of presenting a topic to an audience. It is typically a demonstration, introduction, lecture, or speech meant to inform, persuade, inspire, motivate, or to build good will or to present a new idea or product. The term can also be used for a formal or ritualized introduction or offering, as with the presentation of a debutante. Presentations in certain formats are also known as keynote address.

Shorter Oxford English Dictionary

The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary (SOED) is an English language dictionary published by the Oxford University Press. The SOED is a two-volume abridgement of the twenty-volume Oxford English Dictionary (OED).

The Oxford Dictionary of Islam

The Oxford Dictionary of Islam is a dictionary of Islam, published by the Oxford University Press, with John Esposito as editor-in-chief.

Languages

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.