Outside (magazine)

Outside is an American magazine focused on the outdoors. The first issue of Outside was published in September 1977.[2]

Outside
Outside (magazine cover)
Editor-in-ChiefLawrence J. Burke
FrequencyMonthly
Total circulation
(June 2012)
686,623[1]
First issueSeptember 1977
CompanyMariah Media
CountryUnited States
Based inSanta Fe, New Mexico
LanguageEnglish
Websiteoutsideonline.com
ISSN0278-1433

History

Outside's founders were Jann Wenner (the first editor in chief), William Randolph Hearst III (its first managing editor), and Jack Ford (an assistant to founding publisher Donald Welsh and a son of former U.S. President Gerald Ford).[3] Wenner sold Outside to current owner Lawrence J. Burke two years later. Burke merged it into his magazine Mariah (founded in 1976) and after a period of using the name Mariah/Outside kept the Outside name for the merged magazine. [4] Christopher Keyes is the current editor.

Notable contributors

John Askwith, Design Director. Outside launched the careers of Sebastian Junger, Jon Krakauer, and other freelance travel and adventure writers. Though the magazine has tilted toward a more commercial aesthetic in recent years, it has also recruited figures from the literary world for freelance assignments. Writers whose work has appeared in Outside include Bruce Barcott, Tim Cahill, Daniel Coyle, E. Annie Proulx, naturalist and author David Quammen, and Bob Shacochis. Songwriter David Berkeley also worked for Outside.

Outside television

Effective June 1, 2010, its owner Santa Fe, New Mexico–based Mariah Media, launched Outside Television in partnership with Resorts Sports Network, which was rebranded Outside Television.[5]

See also

References

  1. ^ "eCirc for Consumer Magazines". Alliance for Audited Media. June 30, 2012. Retrieved December 2, 2012.
  2. ^ "List of Top 10 Best Sports Magazines of All time". Sporty Ghost. 3 March 2015. Retrieved 12 February 2016.
  3. ^ Dougherty, Philip H. (6 May 1977). "Advertising: Outside More Moss for Rolling Stone?". The New York Times. p. 83. Retrieved September 5, 2014.
  4. ^ Pogrebin, Robin (October 27, 1997). "Outside Magazine Succeeds by Defying Categories". The New York Times. pp. D1, D13. Retrieved October 20, 2013.
  5. ^ "Mariah Media and Resort Sports Network Partner To Launch The Outside Television Network" (Press release). Outside Television. December 7, 2009. Archived from the original on June 19, 2010.

External links

1996 Mount Everest disaster

The 1996 Mount Everest disaster occurred on 10–11 May 1996, when eight people caught in a blizzard died on Mount Everest during attempts to descend from the summit. Over the entire season, 12 people died trying to reach the summit, making it the deadliest season on Mount Everest before the 16 fatalities of the 2014 Mount Everest avalanche and the 22 deaths resulting from avalanches caused by the April 2015 Nepal earthquake. The 1996 disaster gained wide publicity and raised questions about the commercialization of Everest.Numerous climbers, including several large teams as well as some small partnerships and soloists, were high in altitude on Everest during the storm. While climbers died on both the North Face and South Col approaches, the events on the South Face were more widely reported. Journalist Jon Krakauer, on assignment from Outside magazine, was in a party led by guide Rob Hall that lost four climbers on the south side; he afterwards published the bestseller Into Thin Air (1997), which related his experience. Anatoli Boukreev, a guide in Scott Fischer's party (which lost Scott Fischer, but no clients), felt impugned by Krakauer's book and co-authored a rebuttal book called The Climb: Tragic Ambitions on Everest (1997). Beck Weathers, of Hall's expedition, and Lene Gammelgaard, of Fischer's expedition, wrote about their experiences of the disaster in their respective books, Left For Dead: My Journey Home from Everest (2000) and Climbing High: A Woman's Account of Surviving the Everest Tragedy (2000). In 2014, Lou Kasischke, also of Hall's expedition, published his own account of the tragedy in After the Wind: 1996 Everest Tragedy, One Survivor's Story (2014). Mike Trueman, who coordinated the rescue from Base Camp, has added to the story with The Storms: Adventure and Tragedy on Everest (May 2015). Graham Ratcliffe, who climbed to the South Col of Everest on 10 May, has documented in A Day To Die For (2011) that weather reports delivered to expedition leaders including Rob Hall and Scott Fischer before their planned summit attempts on 10 May forecast a major storm developing after 8 May and peaking in intensity on 11 May. As Hall and Fischer planned their summits for 10 May, portions of their teams summitted Everest during an apparent break in this developing storm only to descend into the full force of it late on 10 May.

Alex Lowe

Stewart Alexander "Alex" Lowe (24 December 1958 – 5 October 1999) was an American mountaineer. He has been described as inspiring "...a whole generation of climbers and explorers with his uncontainable enthusiasm, legendary training routines, and significant ascents of rock climbs, ice climbs, and mountains all over the world...". He died in an avalanche in Tibet. The Alex Lowe Charitable Foundation honors his legacy.

Blue Crush

Blue Crush is a 2002 sports film directed by John Stockwell and based on Susan Orlean's Outside magazine article "Life's Swell". The film stars Kate Bosworth, Michelle Rodriguez, Sanoe Lake and Mika Boorem, and tells the story of three friends who have one passion: living the ultimate dream of surfing on Hawaii's famed North Shore.

Chris McCandless

Christopher Johnson McCandless (; February 12, 1968 – c. August 1992) was an American hiker and itinerant person, who also went by the name "Alexander Supertramp". After graduating from college in 1990, McCandless traveled across the North American continent and eventually hitchhiked to Alaska in April 1992. There, he set out along an old mining road known as the Stampede Trail, with minimal supplies, hoping to live simply off the land. In September, McCandless' decomposing body, weighing only 30 kilograms (67 lb), was found by a hunter in a converted bus, Fairbanks Bus 142, used as a backcountry shelter along the Stampede Trail, on the eastern bank of the Sushana River. His cause of death was officially ruled to be starvation, although the exact cause remains the subject of some debate.In January 1993, Jon Krakauer published McCandless' story in that month's issue of Outside magazine. He had been assigned the story and had written it under a tight deadline. Inspired by the details of McCandless' story, Krakauer wrote and published the more extensive biographical book Into the Wild (1996), about McCandless' travels. The book was subsequently adapted into a 2007 film directed by Sean Penn, with Emile Hirsch portraying McCandless. That same year, McCandless' story also became the subject of Ron Lamothe's documentary The Call of the Wild (2007).

Dave Hahn

David Allen Hahn (born November 3, 1961, Okinawa, Japan) is an American professional mountain guide, ski patroller, journalist and lecturer. In May 2013, he reached the summit of Mount Everest for the 15th time - the most for a non-Sherpa climber, according to Outside Magazine contributor and climber Alan Arnette. Among Hahn’s other notable accomplishments are his 35 summits of Vinson Massif, Antarctica’s highest mountain. He has reached the summit of Denali in Alaska, North America’s highest peak, 21 times over the course of 30 expeditions.

David Quammen

David Quammen (born February 1948) is an American science, nature and travel writer and the author of fifteen books. He wrote a column called "Natural Acts" for Outside magazine for fifteen years. His articles have also appeared in National Geographic, Harper's, Rolling Stone, the New York Times Book Review and other periodicals. In 2013, Quammen's book Spillover was shortlisted for the PEN/E. O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award.

Dean Potter

Dean Shawn Potter (April 14, 1972 – May 16, 2015) was an American free climber, alpinist, BASE jumper, and highliner. He was noted for hard first ascents, free solo ascents, speed ascents, and enchainments in Yosemite National Park and Patagonia. Potter died in a wingsuit flying accident in Yosemite National Park.

Glenwood Springs, Colorado

Glenwood Springs is the Home Rule Municipality that is the county seat and the most populous municipality of Garfield County, Colorado, United States. Glenwood Springs is located at the confluence of the Roaring Fork River and the Colorado River, threading together the Roaring Fork Valley and a series of smaller towns up and down the Colorado River. As of the 2010 census it had a population of 9,614.Glenwood Springs is best known as a historic destination for vacationers with diverse natural amenities, most particularly hot springs, but gentrification and development have introduced modern cultural, dining, and recreational activities as well. It is also home to two of the campuses and the administrative offices of the Colorado Mountain College system.

Glenwood Springs in 2015 was named the "Most Vibrant Small Town Arts Environment in the United States" by Southern Methodist University and the 5th Best Place to Live in America by Outside magazine. It was named the "Most Fun Town in America" by Rand McNally and USA Today in 2011.

Hampton Sides

(Wade) Hampton Sides (born 1962) is an American historian, who is also known to be in the same family as Charlie Hoffman. author and journalist. He is the author of Americana, Hellhound on His Trail, Ghost Soldiers, Blood and Thunder, and other bestselling works of narrative history and literary non-fiction.

Sides is editor-at-large for Outside magazine and has written for such periodicals as National Geographic, The New Yorker, Esquire, Men's Journal, and The Washington Post. His magazine work, collected in numerous published anthologies, has been twice nominated for National Magazine Awards for feature writing.

Jack Hitt

Jack Hitt is an American author. He is a contributing editor to Harper's, The New York Times Magazine, and This American Life; he has also written for the now-defunct magazine Lingua Franca, and his work frequently appears in such publications as Outside Magazine, Rolling Stone, and Wired. In 1990, he received the Livingston Award, along with Paul Tough, for an article about computer hackers who gained access to the New York telephone system. . In 2006, a piece on the racist subtexts of a study on the first Americans was selected for Best American Science Writing, and another piece about dying languages appeared in Best American Travel Writing. Another piece, on the existential life of a superfund site, was included in Ira Glass's The New Kings of Nonfiction (2007). In 2017 he cohosted the Gimlet Media podcast Uncivil along with Chenjerai Kumanyika.

Jake Wetzel

Jacob Wetzel (born December 26, 1976) is a Canadian rower. He has represented both Canada and the United States at the World Championships and the Olympics. He was born in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.

Mark Allen (triathlete)

Mark Allen (born January 12, 1958 in Glendale, California) is a six-time Ironman Triathlon World Champion. He graduated from UC San Diego, where he was an All-American swimmer, with a degree in biology.After competing and losing in the Ironman Triathlon Championships six times (often to Dave Scott), Allen emerged victorious in 1989, winning one of the most difficult one-day sporting events in the world.

This was the first of six Ironman victories for Allen, the last coming in 1995 at age 37, making him the oldest winner of the event at that time. He has also excelled at the Olympic distance, winning the sport's inaugural World Championships in 1989 in Avignon, France, by more than a minute. He was undefeated in 10 trips to the Nice International Championships, and from 1988-1990 he had a winning streak of 21 races.

Over the course of his racing career, which ended in 1996, he maintained a 90% average in top-three finishes. He was named Triathlete of the Year six times by Triathlete magazine, and in 1997 Outside magazine dubbed him The World's Fittest Man. Allen was inducted into the Ironman Triathlon Hall of Fame in 1997. He has also been inducted into the USAT Hall of Fame and the ITU Hall of Fame.

Mark Allen has come to summarize his career in four characters: "1-6-21-infinity". "1" is for his victory in the first official triathlon World Championship. "6" is for the six times he won the Ironman. 21 stands for his two season run of 21 straight victories, along the way defeating every one of the top 50 triathletes in the world. "Infinity" represents his acknowledgement by ESPN as "The Greatest Endurance Athlete of All Time."

Allen owns and operates Mark Allen Coaching, a global online triathlon coaching concern.

Outside TV

Outside TV (formerly RSN Television) is a sports-oriented cable and satellite television network based on Outside magazine and the critically acclaimed brand. Outside TV is the only programming network dedicated to the active adventure lifestyle in the United States. The network covers running, biking, skiing, hiking, sailing, surfing, kayaking, and any other adventures involving wind, water, snow and terrain; as well as the full spectrum of the lives of those who engage in them. High-definition programs appear on the company's cable, satellite, telco and broadband providers’ sports and entertainment offerings.

Schmidt sting pain index

The Schmidt sting pain index is a pain scale rating the relative pain caused by different hymenopteran stings. It is mainly the work of Justin O. Schmidt (born 1947), an entomologist at the Carl Hayden Bee Research Center in Arizona. Schmidt has published a number of papers on the subject, and claims to have been stung by the majority of stinging Hymenoptera.

His original paper in 1983 was a way to systematize and compare the hemolytic properties of insect venoms. The index contained in the paper started from 0 for stings that are completely ineffective against humans, progressed through 2, a familiar pain such as a common bee or wasp sting and finished at 4 for the most painful stings. Synoeca septentrionalis, along with other wasps in the genus Synoeca, bullet ants and tarantula hawks were the only species to attain this ranking. In the conclusion, some descriptions of the most painful examples were given, e.g.: "Paraponera clavata stings induced immediate, excruciating pain and numbness to pencil-point pressure, as well as trembling in the form of a totally uncontrollable urge to shake the affected part."

Subsequently, Schmidt has refined his scale, culminating in a paper published in 1990, which classifies the stings of 78 species and 41 genera of Hymenoptera. Schmidt described some of the experiences in vivid detail.An entry in The Straight Dope reported that "implausibly exact numbers" which do not appear in any of Schmidt’s published scientific papers were "wheedled out of him" by Outside magazine for an article it published in 1996.In September 2015, Schmidt was co-awarded the Ig Nobel Physiology and Entomology prize with Michael Smith, for their Hymenoptera research.

Shamu

Shamu was a killer whale (orca) which appeared in shows at SeaWorld San Diego in the mid/late 1960s. She was the fourth orca ever captured, and the second female. She was caught in October 1965 and died in August, 1971 after about six years of performance. After her death, the name Shamu continued to be used in SeaWorld "Shamu" shows for different orcas in different SeaWorld parks.

Ski mountaineering

Ski mountaineering (abbreviated to skimo) is a skiing discipline that involves climbing mountains either on skis or carrying them, depending on the steepness of the ascent, and then descending on skis. There are two major categories of equipment used, free-heel Telemark skis and skis based on Alpine skis, where the heel is free for ascents, but is fixed during descent. The discipline may be practiced recreationally or as a competitive sport.Competitive ski mountaineering is typically a timed racing event that follows an established trail through challenging winter alpine terrain while passing through a series of checkpoints. Racers climb and descend under their own power using backcountry skiing equipment and techniques. More generally, ski mountaineering is an activity that variously combines ski touring, Telemark, backcountry skiing, and mountaineering.

TaylorMade

TaylorMade Golf Company is an American manufacturer of golf clubs, bags and accessories based in Carlsbad, California, United States. TaylorMade Golf was sold by Adidas to KPS Capital Partners in October 2017.

TaylorMade's initial success came with the innovation of metal drivers, which debuted in 1979 and have subsequently dominated the golf market. In September 2012, Outside magazine named TaylorMade one of America's "Best Places to Work".

West Rim Trail

The West Rim Trail is a 30.5 mi (49.1 km) hiking trail along Pine Creek in Lycoming and Tioga Counties in north central Pennsylvania in the United States. The trail runs along Pine Creek Gorge, also known as the Grand Canyon of Pennsylvania, which is 800 feet (240 m) deep and about 2,000 feet (610 m) wide from rim to rim in the area traversed by the West Rim Trail. The trail is entirely within the Tioga State Forest and is known for its large number of vistas overlooking the gorge, which is a National Natural Landmark. The West Rim Trail was chosen by Outside Magazine as its "Best Hike in Pennsylvania" in April, 1996.

Yarnell Hill Fire

The Yarnell Hill Fire was a wildfire near Yarnell, Arizona, ignited by lightning on June 28, 2013. On June 30, it overran and killed 19 City of Prescott firefighters, members of the Granite Mountain Hotshots. It was one of the deadliest U.S. wildfires since the 1991 East Bay Hills fire, which killed 25 people, and the deadliest wildland fire for U.S. firefighters since the 1933 Griffith Park Fire, which killed 29 impromptu civilian firefighters. It was also the most fatal incident of any kind involving U.S. firefighters since the September 11 attacks, which killed 343 firefighters. It is the sixth-deadliest American firefighter disaster overall, the deadliest wildfire ever in Arizona, and at least until 2014, was "the most publicized event in wildland firefighting history."

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