Out (baseball)

In baseball, an out occurs when the umpire rules a batter or baserunner out for one of the reasons given below. When three outs are recorded in an inning, a team's half of the inning (their turn at batting), ends.

To signal an out, an umpire generally makes a fist with one hand, and then flexes that arm either upward, particularly on pop flies, or forward, particularly on routine plays at first base. Home plate umpires often use a "punch-out" motion to signal a called third strike.

Ways of making outs

  • Some common ways batters or runners are put out are when:
  • The batter is out when:
    • with two strikes, the batter swings at a pitched ball and misses;[1]
    • with two strikes, he does not swing at a pitch that the umpire judges to be in the strike zone (and the catcher catches the ball and does not drop it);[2]
    • with two strikes, he foul tips a pitch directly back into the catcher's mitt, and the catcher holds the ball and does not drop it;[3][4]:5.09(a)(2)
    • with two strikes, he bunts a pitch into foul territory;[5][4]:5.09(a)(4)
    • the third strike is pitched and caught in flight;[4]:5.09(a)(1)
    • on any third strike, if a baserunner is on first and there are fewer than two outs (even when not caught);[4]:5.09(a)(3)
    • he is hit by his own fair ball, outside the batter's box, before the ball is played by a fielder;[4]:5.09(a)(7)
    • he commits interference;[4]:5.09(a)(8-9)
    • he fails to bat in his proper turn and is discovered in an appeal;
    • he hits a pitch while one foot is entirely outside the batter's box;
    • he steps from one batter's box to the other when the pitcher is ready to pitch; or
    • he is found to have used an altered bat.[4]:6.03(a)(5).
  • The batter-runner is out when:
    • a fielder with a live ball in his possession touches first base or tags the batter-runner before the batter-runner reaches first base (except when the batter is awarded first base, such as on a base on balls)
    • a batted ball is caught in flight (fly out);
    • he hits an infield popup while the infield fly rule applies;
    • a fielder intentionally drops a line drive with fewer than two outs in a force situation (man on first, men on first and second, men on first and third, bases loaded) in an attempt to create a double play;
    • a preceding runner interferes with a fielder trying to complete a double play on the batter-runner; or
    • the batter-runner does not return directly to first base after overrunning the bag and he is tagged with the ball by a fielder.
  • Any baserunner, other than the batter-runner, is out when:
    • he is forced out; that is, he fails to reach his force base before a fielder with a live ball touches that base;
    • a fielder catches a batted ball in flight, and subsequently, some fielder with a live ball in possession touches the runner's time of pitch base before the runner tags up (appeal play);
    • while he is attempting to reach home plate with fewer than two outs, the batter interferes with a fielder and such action hinders a potential tag out near home plate;
    • he is found to have committed a mockery of the game, for example a stolen base of first from second; or
    • he is found to be an illegal substitute.
  • Any baserunner, including the batter-runner, is out when:
    • he is tagged out; that is, touched by a fielder's hand holding a live ball while in jeopardy, such as while not touching a base;
    • he passes a base without touching it and a member of the defensive team properly executes a live ball appeal;
    • he commits interference, such as when he contacts a fielder playing a batted ball, or when he contacts a live batted ball before it passes a fielder other than the pitcher;
    • he strays more than three feet (.91 meters) from his running baseline in attempting to avoid a tag;
    • he passes a preceding runner who is not out;
    • he is touched by a fair ball in fair territory before the ball has touched or passed an infielder. The ball is dead and no runner may score, nor runners advance, except runners forced to advance. EXCEPTION: If a runner is touching his base when touched by an infield fly, he is not out, although the batter is out;
    • he intentionally abandons his effort to run the bases after touching first base; or
    • he runs the bases in reverse order in an attempt to confuse the defense or to make a travesty of the game.[4]:5.09(b)(10)

Crediting outs

In baseball statistics, each out must be credited to exactly one defensive player, namely the player who was the direct cause of the out. When referring to outs credited to a defensive player, the term putout is used. Example: a batter hits a fair ball which is fielded by the shortstop. The shortstop then throws the ball to the first baseman. The first baseman then steps on first base before the batter reaches it. For this play, only the first baseman is credited with a putout, while the shortstop is credited with an assist. For a strikeout, the catcher is credited with a putout, because the batter is not out until the pitched ball is caught by the catcher. (If the catcher drops the third strike and has to throw the batter-runner out at first base, the first baseman receives the putout while the catcher receives an assist.) When an out is recorded without a fielder's direct involvement, such as where a runner is hit by a batted ball, the fielder nearest to the action is usually credited with the putout.

Although pitchers seldom get credited with putouts, they are credited with their role in getting outs through various pitching statistics such as innings pitched (a measure of the number of outs made by the pitcher, used in calculating his ERA) and strikeouts.

See also

Further reading

References

  1. ^ Baseball Explained by Phillip Mahony, McFarland Books, 2014. See www.baseballexplained.com Archived August 13, 2014, at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ Baseball Explained by Phillip Mahony, McFarland Books, 2014. See www.baseballexplained.com Archived August 13, 2014, at the Wayback Machine
  3. ^ Baseball Explained by Phillip Mahony, McFarland Books, 2014. See www.baseball explained.com
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h Official Baseball Rules 2017 Edition. United States of America: Office of the Commissioner of Baseball. 2017. ISBN 978-0-9961140-4-2. Retrieved September 17, 2017.
  5. ^ Baseball Explained by Phillip Mahony, McFarland Books, 2014. See www.baseballexplained.com Archived August 13, 2014, at the Wayback Machine
2013 Big Ten Conference Baseball Tournament

The 2013 Big Ten Conference Baseball Tournament was held at Target Field in Minneapolis, MN from May 22 through 25. The six team, double-elimination tournament determined the league champion for the 2013 NCAA Division I baseball season. Indiana won the tournament to claim the Big Ten Conference's automatic bid to the 2013 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament. The event was aired on the Big Ten Network.

Atlanta Braves

The Atlanta Braves are an American professional baseball franchise based in the Atlanta metropolitan area. The franchise competes in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member of the National League (NL) East division. The Braves played home games at Atlanta–Fulton County Stadium from 1966 to 1996, and Turner Field from 1997 to 2016. Since 2017, their home stadium has been SunTrust Park, located 10 miles (16 km) northwest of downtown Atlanta in Cumberland, Georgia. The Braves play spring training games at CoolToday Park in North Port, Florida.The "Braves" name, which was first used in 1912, originates from a term for a Native American warrior. They are nicknamed "the Bravos", and often referred to as "America's Team" in reference to the team's games being broadcast on the nationally available TBS from the 1970s until 2007, giving the team a nationwide fan base.

From 1991 to 2005, the Braves were one of the most successful teams in baseball, winning division titles an unprecedented 14 consecutive times (omitting the strike-shortened 1994 season in which there were no official division champions), and producing one of the greatest pitching rotations in the history of baseball. Most notably, this rotation consisted of pitchers Greg Maddux, John Smoltz, and Tom Glavine. The Braves won the National League West division from 1991 to 1993, and after divisional realignment, the National League East division from 1995 to 2005. They returned to the playoffs as the National League Wild Card in 2010. The Braves advanced to the World Series five times in the 1990s (1991, 1992, 1995, 1996, and 1999), winning the title in 1995 against the Cleveland Indians. Since their debut in the National League in 1876, the franchise has won 18 divisional titles, 17 National League pennants, and three World Series championships — in 1914 as the Boston Braves, in 1957 as the Milwaukee Braves, and in 1995 as the Atlanta Braves. The Braves are the only Major League Baseball franchise to have won the World Series in three different home cities.

The Braves and the Chicago Cubs are the National League's two remaining charter franchises. The Braves were founded in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1871, as the Boston Red Stockings (not to be confused with the American League's Boston Red Sox). The team states it is "the oldest continuously operating professional sports franchise in America."After various name changes, the team eventually began operating as the Boston Braves, which lasted for most of the first half of the 20th century. Then, in 1953, the team moved to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and became the Milwaukee Braves, followed by the final move to Atlanta in 1966. The team's tenure in Atlanta is noted for Hank Aaron breaking Babe Ruth's career home run record in 1974.

Base running

In baseball, base running is the act of running around the bases performed by members of the team at bat.

In general, base running is a tactical part of the game with the goal of eventually reaching home to score a run. The goal of batting is generally to produce base runners, or help move base runners along. Runners on second or third base are considered to be in scoring position since a normal hit, even a single, will often score them. Part of the goal of a runner and a batter is to get the runner into scoring position.

Baseball

Baseball is a bat-and-ball game played between two opposing teams who take turns batting and fielding. The game proceeds when a player on the fielding team, called the pitcher, throws a ball which a player on the batting team tries to hit with a bat. The objectives of the offensive team (batting team) are to hit the ball into the field of play, and to run the bases—having its runners advance counter-clockwise around four bases to score what are called "runs". The objective of the defensive team (fielding team) is to prevent batters from becoming runners, and to prevent runners' advance around the bases. A run is scored when a runner legally advances around the bases in order and touches home plate (the place where the player started as a batter). The team that scores the most runs by the end of the game is the winner.

The first objective of the batting team is to have a player reach first base safely. A player on the batting team who reaches first base without being called "out" can attempt to advance to subsequent bases as a runner, either immediately or during teammates' turns batting. The fielding team tries to prevent runs by getting batters or runners "out", which forces them out of the field of play. Both the pitcher and fielders have methods of getting the batting team's players out. The opposing teams switch back and forth between batting and fielding; the batting team's turn to bat is over once the fielding team records three outs. One turn batting for each team constitutes an inning. A game is usually composed of nine innings, and the team with the greater number of runs at the end of the game wins. If scores are tied at the end of nine innings, extra innings are usually played. Baseball has no game clock, although most games end in the ninth inning.

Baseball evolved from older bat-and-ball games already being played in England by the mid-18th century. This game was brought by immigrants to North America, where the modern version developed. By the late 19th century, baseball was widely recognized as the national sport of the United States. Baseball is popular in North America and parts of Central and South America, the Caribbean, and East Asia, particularly in Japan and South Korea.

In the United States and Canada, professional Major League Baseball (MLB) teams are divided into the National League (NL) and American League (AL), each with three divisions: East, West, and Central. The MLB champion is determined by playoffs that culminate in the World Series. The top level of play is similarly split in Japan between the Central and Pacific Leagues and in Cuba between the West League and East League. The World Baseball Classic, organized by the World Baseball Softball Confederation, is the major international competition of the sport and attracts the top national teams from around the world.

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William Daryl Bajema II (born October 31, 1982) is a former American football tight end. He was drafted by the San Francisco 49ers in the seventh round of the 2005 NFL Draft. He played college football at Oklahoma State.

Blake Trahan

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Dave Stieb

David Andrew Stieb (; born July 22, 1957) is a former Major League Baseball right-handed starting pitcher for the Toronto Blue Jays. A seven-time All-Star, he also won The Sporting News' Pitcher of the Year Award in 1982. Stieb won 140 games in the 1980s, the second-highest total by a pitcher in that decade, behind only Jack Morris. Dave Stieb was inducted into the Ontario Sports Hall of Fame in 1995.

Gary Nolan (baseball)

Gary Lynn Nolan (born May 27, 1948 in Herlong, California) is a former Major League Baseball right-handed starting pitcher who played with the Cincinnati Reds (1967–73, 1975–77) and California Angels (1977). He was inducted into the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame in 1983.

Ground out

Ground out may refer to:

Ground out (baseball), a method of putting out a batter

A US colloquialism for an electrical short circuit to earth

Ground out (baseball)

A ground out is a method of putting out a batter in baseball.

In flight

In baseball, the rules state that a batted ball is considered in flight when it has not yet touched any object other than a fielder or his equipment.

Once a batted ball touches the ground, a fence or wall, a foul pole, a base, the pitcher's rubber, an umpire, or a baserunner, it is no longer in flight. A batted ball that passes entirely out of the playing field ceases to be in flight when that occurs.

A special rule exists in covered baseball facilities (retractable or fixed roofed), where a batted ball striking the roof, roof supporting structure, or objects suspended from the roof (e.g., speakers) while in fair territory is still considered to be in flight. Rules for batted balls striking any of those objects in foul territory differ between ballparks, with most considering such a ball to still be in flight, and some considering it to be a foul ball and dead from the time it strikes.

If a batted ball (other than a foul tip, with less than 2 strikes) is caught in flight, the batter is out—called a fly out—and all runners must tag up. A batted ball cannot be ruled foul or fair while in flight; a batted ball that is past first or third base will be called foul or fair based on where it ceases to be in flight, or where it is first touched by a fielder, whichever occurs first. A fly out on a ball in foul territory is also called a foul out. A foul tip, which by definition is always caught in flight, is a strike by special rule, and not an out, unless caught as a 3rd strike.

If a batted ball passes out of the playing field in flight and is fair, it is an automatic home run, entitling the batter and all runners to score without liability to be put out. However, if the fence or other barrier is less than 250 feet from home plate, a ball hit past that fence in flight and fair shall be ruled an automatic double. In the United States, such short fences are very rare even in the lowest-level amateur ballfields. Fields with short fences can be commonplace in some countries where baseball is less popular; often, soccer fields have to be used, resulting in a very short left or right field.

The shortest fair fences in Major League Baseball are both in Boston's Fenway Park; the shortest fence that is nearly perpendicular to the foul line is the Green Monster. The left foul pole, renamed "Fisk's Pole" in honor of Carlton Fisk's famous home run in the 1975 World Series, stands 310 feet away from home plate. The right field foul pole, known as Pesky's Pole, is 302 feet down the right field line, although the wall there is nearly parallel to the foul line as it curves back to the distant right field wall at 380 feet. From 1958 through 1961, the Los Angeles Dodgers played home games in Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, a stadium built for track and field; without the ability to move any of the permanent stadium structure, the Dodgers configured the field to result in a 251-foot left field foul line distance.

Jim Hart (baseball)

James Abner Hart (July 10, 1855 – July 18, 1919) was an American baseball manager for the Louisville Colonels and the Boston Beaneaters for parts of three seasons.

Hart went to the U.K. in the 1890s. A British national professional Baseball body was started in 1890 and a letter to Albert Spalding in America requesting help in establishing a league. The British requested eight to ten players to coach and convert the existing players (whose primary game was usually soccer). Spalding sent Hart as a skilled manager and players: William J. Barr, Charles Bartlett, J. E. Prior and Leech Maskrey.The original intention had been to have eight teams but initially there were just four Aston Villa, Preston North End, Stoke City and Derby. The first three used Jim Hart to decide the line-up of their teams, but Francis Ley at Derby made his own decisions.In 1891 Hart, who was secretary of the Chicago White Stockings (later the Colts and then the Cubs), succeeded Albert G. Spalding as president of the team. Hart was part-owner of the Chicago Colts team, and in the 1895 season, the entire Colts team was arrested for creating a disturbance on Sunday, and Hart bailed every player out.

Madison Dearborn Partners

Madison Dearborn Partners (MDP) is an American private equity firm specializing in leveraged buyouts of privately held or publicly traded companies, or divisions of larger companies; recapitalizations of family-owned or closely held companies; balance sheet restructurings; acquisition financings; and growth capital investments in mature companies. MDP operates using an industry-focused investment approach and focuses on the following sectors: basic industries, business & government software and services, financial & transaction services, health care, and TMT services. Since the founders established MDP as an independent firm in 1992, the firm has raised seven funds with aggregate capital of approximately $23 billion, and has completed investments in more than 130 companies.

Outfield

The outfield, in cricket and baseball, is the area of the field of play further from the batsman or batter than the infield. In soccer (association football), the outfield players are positioned outside the goal area.

Pittsburgh Pirates award winners and league leaders

This is a list of all awards won by players and personnel of the Pittsburgh Pirates professional baseball team.

Ray Schalk

Raymond William Schalk (August 12, 1892 – May 19, 1970) was an American professional baseball player, coach, manager and scout. He played as a catcher in Major League Baseball for the Chicago White Sox for the majority of his career. Known for his fine handling of pitchers and outstanding defensive ability, Schalk was considered the greatest defensive catcher of his era. He revolutionized the way the catching position was played by using his speed and agility to expand the previously accepted defensive capabilities for his position. Schalk was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1955.

The Jackie Robinson Story

The Jackie Robinson Story is a 1950 biographical film directed by Alfred E. Green (who had directed The Jolson Story, "one of the biggest hits of the 40s") and starring Jackie Robinson as himself. The film focuses on Robinson's struggle with the abuse of bigots as he becomes the first African-American Major League Baseball player of the modern era.

The film is among the list of films in the public domain in the United States. However a new copyrighted "restored and in color" version was released in conjunction with the Jackie Robinson Foundation in 2008.

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