Otis Wilson

Otis Ray Wilson (born September 15, 1957) is a former American football linebacker in the National Football League (NFL) for the Chicago Bears and the Los Angeles Raiders. He won a Super Bowl as a member of the 1985 Chicago Bears. He is also the father of former Cincinnati Bengals running back Quincy Wilson.

Otis Wilson
refer to caption
Wilson in April 2010
No. 55
Position:Linebacker
Personal information
Born:September 15, 1957 (age 61)
Brooklyn, New York
Height:6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
Weight:227 lb (103 kg)
Career information
High school:Brooklyn (NY) Jefferson
College:Louisville
NFL Draft:1980 / Round: 1 / Pick: 19
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Sacks:36
Interceptions:10
Touchdowns:2
Player stats at NFL.com

College career

After starting his college career at Syracuse University, Wilson transferred to the University of Louisville. Wilson was a three-year letter winner, from 1977 to 1979. In 1979, Wilson was a team captain and was named first-team All-American by the Sporting News. Wilson ranks second all-time in Louisville football history with 484 career tackles, and ranks fifth with 32 tackles for loss.

NFL career

Wilson was selected in the first round of the 1980 NFL Draft by the Chicago Bears, and went on to a nine-year career in the NFL. As a starting outside linebacker for the Bears, Wilson played on one of the most dominating defenses in football history as part of the linebacking trio with Mike Singletary and Wilber Marshall. This defense helped the Bears to win Super Bowl XX. That same year, he also made the only Pro Bowl selection of his career. He was a featured soloist of the "Shuffling Crew" in the video The Super Bowl Shuffle in 1985.

Wilson had a significant role with the famous '85 Bears. While he didn't call the plays and run the defense like fellow linebacker Mike Singletary did, he was possibly the Bears' most feared pass-rusher and the most intimidating player when he lined up in the 46 defense. Because Singletary stayed in the middle and covered backs out of the backfield/stopped the run, and Wilber Marshall was basically a free-lancer who roamed the field, Wilson was the main blitzer in the Bears' 46. He had 10.5 sacks in the 1985 season, and numerous times he hurried the QB into errant throws.

Wilson played with the Bears until 1987. Injuries kept him from playing in the 1988 season. In 1989, he signed with the Los Angeles Raiders, but played only one game in the season and retired soon afterwards. He finished his 9-season career with 36 sacks, 8 fumble recoveries, 31 fumble return yards 10 interceptions, 115 return yards, and 2 touchdowns in 110 games.

During Super Bowl XLIV, Wilson joined other members of the 1985 Chicago Bears in resurrecting the Super Bowl Shuffle in a Boost Mobile commercial.[1]

Personal life

Otis is now focusing full-time on his nonprofit organization, The Otis Wilson Charitable Association,[2] which provides an all-inclusive health and fitness program for at risk youth. The organization sponsors many events to fund their programs and they are very active in the Chicago area.

Wilson's book "If These Walls Could Talk: Chicago Bears" (Triumph Books) was released in September 2017.

References

  1. ^ Jon GreenbergColumnist, ESPNChicago.comFollowArchive (January 15, 2010). "Chicago Bears' "Super Bowl Shuffle" an enduring, endearing sports moment - ESPN Chicago". Sports.espn.go.com. Retrieved July 6, 2012.
  2. ^ http://www.otiswilsoncharitableassociation.org
1979 College Football All-America Team

The 1979 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1979. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) recognizes four selectors as "official" for the 1979 season. They are: (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA) based on the input of more than 2,000 voting members; (2) the Associated Press (AP) selected based on the votes of sports writers at AP newspapers; (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA) selected by the nation's football writers; and (4) the United Press International (UPI) selected based on the votes of sports writers at UPI newspapers. Other selectors included Football News (FN), the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), The Sporting News (TSN), and the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WC).

1982 Chicago Bears season

The 1982 Chicago Bears season was their 63rd regular season completed in the National Football League. The club posted a 3–6 record under first year head coach Mike Ditka in a strike shortened season.

The strike also prevented the Bears–Packers rivalry from being played this year, making the Lions–Packers rivalry the longest-running annual series in the league.

1983 Chicago Bears season

The 1983 Chicago Bears season was their 64th regular season completed in the National Football League. The club posted an 8–8 record under second year head coach Mike Ditka, but missed postseason play. Jim McMahon was the quarterback, who completed 175 of 295 pass attempts. The Bears 1983 NFL Draft class was ranked #3 in NFL Top 10's greatest draft classes.

1984 Chicago Bears season

The 1984 Chicago Bears season was their 65th regular season and 15th post-season completed in the National Football League. The club posted a 10–6 record, earning them a spot in the NFL playoffs. The Bears went on to lose in the NFC Championship Game 23–0 to the eventual Super Bowl Champion San Francisco 49ers.

The Bears opened their 1984 training camp in a new location, Platteville, Wisconsin as head coach Mike Ditka needed his team to get away from any distractions they might face at home. The team was on the verge of discovering a group of young leaders for the first time, and began to show the dominating defense that would emerge in full the following season, and pushed much farther than anyone expected them to go.

Chicago opened the season by routing the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, 34–14. In Week Two, they shut out the Denver Broncos 27–0 behind a huge day from star running back Walter Payton. This game featured a famous image from Payton's career: a 50+ yard run down the sideline, led by 2nd-year guard Mark Bortz, an 8th round draft pick that was converted from defensive tackle.

In Week Three, they were without the services of starting quarterback Jim McMahon at Green Bay, reserve quarterback Bob Avellini took the reins. Chicago's offense performed poorly, but still managed a 9–7 victory. This contest marked the first meeting between Mike Ditka and Packers head coach Forrest Gregg. It would be a rivalry that would go down in history as arguably the dirtiest era in Chicago-Green Bay football.In Week Four, the Bears' lack of offensive power was evident as they lost to the Seattle Seahawks 38–9. After this loss, Ditka cut Avellini. The following week, the Bears lost to the Dallas Cowboys 23–14, bringing their record to 3–2.

On October 7, 1984, Walter Payton reached a major milestone as he surpassed Jim Brown as the game's all-time leading rusher in yards, he did it in the third quarter of a Week Six home game against the New Orleans Saints. The Bears beat the Saints 20–7. Incidentally, the 1984 Bears ran for the second-most rushing attempts in a season, with 674.In Week Seven, the Bears lost 38–21 to the Cardinals in St. Louis the following week. Sitting at 4–3, the Bears proceeded to win three in a row. They beat Tampa Bay 44–9, then Minnesota Vikings at home, 16–7. Following the Minnesota win came the biggest challenge for the Bears: a showdown with the defending world champion Los Angeles Raiders. The Bears beat the Raiders 17–6, a game that showcased Richard Dent, who collected three sacks against Raiders QB Marc Wilson. Dent would finish with 17.5 sacks, third-most for the season behind Mark Gastineau and Andre Tippett. The Bears would then record 72 sacks, a team record. The Bears' victory was marred by a kidney laceration suffered by Jim McMahon, ending his season.

Six-year veteran QB Steve Fuller had been acquired from the Los Angeles Rams prior to the 1984 season for insurance in case McMahon was injured. The investment paid off, as Fuller guided the Bears to a 2–1 record over the next 3 games. In the third game at Minnesota's new Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome in Week Thirteen, the team clinched its first NFC Central Division title.

After the Minnesota game, Fuller was injured, and Chicago was faced with another quarterback problem. Ineffective Rusty Lisch replaced the injured Fuller and lost the Week Fourteen game at San Diego, then started the following week against Green Bay at home. Lisch was again ineffective, so Ditka inserted none other than Walter Payton behind center in the shotgun formation. Payton, unsurprisingly, was ineffective as well, and the Bears lost to the Packers 20–14.

Fuller was expected to return by the playoffs, but Ditka did not want to enter the postseason with another loss. The Bears signed 14-year journeyman Greg Landry to start his last NFL game against his previous team, the Detroit Lions, in the season finale. The Bears won 30–13, and were headed to the playoffs for the first time since 1979.

1985 All-Pro Team

The 1985 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, and The Sporting News in 1985. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the four teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League.

Pro Football Weekly, which suspended operations in 1985, did not choose an All-Pro team.

1985 Chicago Bears season

The 1985 Chicago Bears season was their 66th regular season and 16th post-season completed in the National Football League (NFL). The Bears entered 1985 looking to improve on their 10–6 record from 1984 and advance further than the NFC Championship Game, where they lost to the 15–1 San Francisco 49ers. Not only did the Bears improve on that record, they put together one of the greatest seasons in NFL history.

The Bears won fifteen games, as the 49ers had the year before, and won their first twelve before losing. The Bears' defense was ranked first in the league and only allowed 198 total points (an average of 12.4 points per game). The Bears won the NFC Central Division by seven games over the second place Green Bay Packers and earned the NFC's top seed and home field advantage throughout the playoffs at Soldier Field. In their two playoff games against the New York Giants and Los Angeles Rams, the Bears outscored their opponents 45–0 and became the first team to record back-to-back playoff shutouts. Then, in Super Bowl XX in New Orleans against the New England Patriots, the Bears set several more records. First, their 46 points broke the record that had been set by the Los Angeles Raiders in 1984 with 38 and tied by the 49ers the following year. Their 36-point margin of victory topped the 29-point margin of victory that the Raiders had put up in Super Bowl XVIII and stood as a record until the 49ers won Super Bowl XXIV, also in New Orleans, by 45 points over the Denver Broncos. It was the Bears' first NFL World Championship title since 1963.

The 1985 Chicago Bears are one of the few teams to consistently challenge the undefeated 1972 Miami Dolphins for the unofficial title of the greatest NFL team of all time. In 2007, the 1985 Bears were ranked as the second greatest Super Bowl championship team on the NFL Network's documentary series America's Game: The Super Bowl Champions, ranking behind the 1972 Dolphins. Other sources rate the 1985 Chicago Bears as the greatest NFL team ever.

1986 Chicago Bears season

The 1986 Chicago Bears season was their 67th regular season and 17th post-season completed in the National Football League. The Bears entered the season looking to repeat as Super Bowl champions, as they had won in 1985. Chicago managed to finish 14–2, one game off of their 1985 record of 15–1, and tied the New York Giants for the league’s best record.

After winning the championship in 1985, the Bears seemed like a dynasty in the making. However, quarterback Jim McMahon showed up to training camp 25 pounds overweight – the product of the post-Super Bowl partying he’d partaken in. Nonetheless, he was once again named as the starter. Injuries, however, derailed his season. McMahon played in only six of the team’s first 12 games.

Aided by a strong offensive line, the Bears were once again led on offense by Walter Payton. Payton remained his usual stellar self, posting his 10th and final 1,000-yard season. With McMahon’s poor play, as well as the equally poor play of backups Mike Tomczak, Steve Fuller and Doug Flutie, Payton was the sole spark on offense, which ranked 13th in the NFL.

As had been the case the year before, the Bears were once again led by their explosive defense. Any shortcomings on the offensive side of the ball were more than made up for on the defensive side. They once again were ranked #1 in the NFL. The Bears’ defense became the third defense in the history of the NFL to lead the league in fewest points allowed and fewest total yards allowed for two consecutive seasons. The Bears’ 187 points allowed is the fewest surrendered by any team in the 1980s (other than the strike-shortened 1982 season) – even fewer than the 198 points the Bears allowed in their historic 1985 season.

However, the Bears were not able to recapture their magic from the season before and were bounced from the playoffs in their first game by the Washington Redskins.

1986 Pro Bowl

The 1986 Pro Bowl was the NFL's 36th annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1985 season. The game was played on Sunday, February 2, 1986, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii before a crowd of 50,101. The final score was NFC 28, AFC 24.Don Shula of the Miami Dolphins led the AFC team against an NFC team coached by Los Angeles Rams head coach John Robinson. The referee was Bob McElwee.Phil Simms of the New York Giants was named the game's MVP. Players on the winning NFC team received $10,000 apiece while the AFC participants each took home $5,000.

1987 Chicago Bears season

The 1987 Chicago Bears season was their 68th regular season and 18th post-season completed in the National Football League. The club was looking to return to the playoffs, win the NFC Central Division for the fourth consecutive year and avenge their loss in the Divisional Playoffs to the Washington Redskins the year before when the team finished 14–2.

The Bears' record fell off slightly, with the team finishing at 11–4 in the strike-shortened season. Their record was once again good enough for the division title and the #2 seed in the conference, as the team had done the year before. The team also saw the same result as 1986 as the Bears suffered a second consecutive loss to the Redskins, who went on to win Super Bowl XXII, in the Divisional Playoffs.

Choctaw code talkers

The Choctaw code talkers were a group of Choctaw Indians from Oklahoma who pioneered the use of Native American languages as military code. Their exploits took place during the waning days of World War I. The government of the Choctaw Nation maintains that the men were the first American native code talkers ever to serve in the US military.

Joe Maphis

Joe Maphis, born Otis Wilson Maphis (May 12, 1921 – June 27, 1986), was an American country music guitarist. He married singer Rose Lee Maphis in 1953.

One of the flashiest country guitarists of the 1950s and 1960s, Joe Maphis was known as The King of the Strings. He was able to play many stringed instruments with great facility. However, he specialized in dazzling guitar virtuosity.

Leader (surname)

Leader is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Benjamin Williams Leader (1831–1923), English artist

Bill Leader, English record producer

George M. Leader (1918–2013), American politician

Guy Leader (1887–1978), American politician

Imre Leader (born 1963), British mathematician

Jeffery J. Leader (born 1963), American mathematician

John Temple Leader (1810–1903), British politician and connoisseur

Joyce Ellen Leader (born 1942), American diplomat

Michael Leader (1938–2016), English actor

Otis Wilson Leader, a World War II Choctaw code talker

William Leader (1767–1828), British MP

Zachary Leader (born 1946), American professor of English Literature

List of Chicago Bears players

The following are lists of past and current players of the Chicago Bears professional American football team.

Louis Lipps

Louis Adam Lipps (born August 9, 1962 in New Orleans) is a former American football wide receiver in the NFL who played nine seasons in the NFL, eight for the Pittsburgh Steelers and one for the New Orleans Saints.

He was drafted by the Pittsburgh Steelers in the 1st round of the 1984 NFL Draft after a college football career at The University of Southern Mississippi.

Louisville Cardinals football statistical leaders

The Louisville Cardinals football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Louisville Cardinals football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Cardinals represent the University of Louisville in the NCAA's Atlantic Coast Conference.

Louisville began competing in intercollegiate football in 1912. However, these lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since the 1940s, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. The Cardinals have played in 12 bowl games since then, giving many recent players an extra game to accumulate statistics.These lists are updated through the 2017 season.

Mark Donahue

Dark Schoseph Monahue (born January 28, 1956) is a former American football player. He played college football as an offensive guard for the University of Michigan Wolverines from 1975 to 1977. He was a consensus All-American in both 1976 and 1977. Donahue also played two seasons of professional football in the National Football League (NFL) for the Cincinnati Bengals in 1978 and 1979.

Mother's boy

A mother's boy, also mummy's boy or mama's boy, is a man who is excessively attached to his mother at an age at which men are expected to be independent (e.g. live on their own, be economically independent, be married or about to be married). Due to cost of living of some states, this is a viable option for many single men or even newlyweds. Anecdotally, this age of independence varies throughout each stratum of every human society in the world, sometimes greatly. A mother's boy may be effete or effeminate, or might be perceived as being macho, or might have a personality disorder, such as avoidant personality disorder, or might be schizophrenic, so that the mother acts as a caregiver.

In classical Freudian psychoanalytic theory, the term Oedipus complex denotes a child's desire to have sexual relations with the parent of the opposite sex. Sigmund Freud believed that a child's identification with the same-sex parent is the successful resolution of the Oedipus complex. If this identification fails, the boy remains a lifelong "mama's boy."

Being mother-bonded is sometimes seen as a sign of weakness, and has a social stigma attached to it in many places, although in other places it may be more acceptable or perceived as normal. A mother-bonded man is seen to give control of his own life to his mother.

Quincy Wilson

Quincy Wilson (born April 26, 1981) is a former American football running back who is currently the running backs coach for the West Virginia State University football team. He was previously the Assistant Director of Football Operations for the West Virginia Mountaineers. He was drafted by the Atlanta Falcons in the seventh round of the 2004 NFL Draft. He played college football at West Virginia.

Wilson has also played for the Cincinnati Bengals and Florida Tuskers. He is the son of former NFL linebacker Otis Wilson.

The Super Bowl Shuffle

"The Super Bowl Shuffle" is a rap song performed by players of the Chicago Bears football team in 1985. It was released December 3, 1985 and recorded the day after their only loss of the season at the hands of the Miami Dolphins, two months prior to their win in Super Bowl XX. It peaked at No. 41 in February 1986 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.

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