Op-ed

An op-ed, short for "opposite the editorial page" or "opinion editorial", is a written prose piece typically published by a newspaper or magazine which expresses the opinion of an author usually not affiliated with the publication's editorial board.[1] Op-eds are different from both editorials (opinion pieces submitted by editorial board members) and letters to the editor (opinion pieces submitted by readers).

Origin

The direct ancestor to the modern op-ed page was created in 1921 by Herbert Bayard Swope of The New York Evening World. When Swope took over as editor in 1920, he realized that the page opposite the editorials was "a catchall for book reviews, society boilerplate, and obituaries".[2] He wrote:

It occurred to me that nothing is more interesting than opinion when opinion is interesting, so I devised a method of cleaning off the page opposite the editorial, which became the most important in America ... and thereon I decided to print opinions, ignoring facts.[3]

Swope included only opinions by employees of his newspaper, leaving the "modern" op-ed page to be developed in 1970 under the direction of The New York Times editor John B. Oakes.[4] The first op-ed page of The New York Times appeared on 21 September 1970.[5] Writes media scholar Michael Socolow of Oakes' innovation:

The Times' effort synthesized various antecedents and editorial visions. Journalistic innovation is usually complex, and typically involves multiple external factors. The Times op-ed page appeared in an era of democratizing cultural and political discourse and of economic distress for the company itself. The newspaper's executives developed a place for outside contributors with space reserved for sale at a premium rate for additional commentaries and other purposes.[6]

Competition from radio and television

Beginning in the 1930s, radio began to threaten print journalism, a process that was later accelerated by the rise of television. To combat this, major newspapers such as The New York Times and The Washington Post began including more openly subjective and opinionated journalism, adding more columns and growing their op-ed pages.[7]

Possible conflicts of interest

A concern about how to clearly disclose the ties in the op-eds arises because the readers of the media cannot be expected to know all about the possible connections between op-eds, editors and interest groups funding some of them. In a letter to The New York Times, the lack of a clear declaration as to conflict of interest in op-eds was criticized by a group of U.S. journalists campaigning for more "op-ed transparency".[8][9]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Definition of op-ed". Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary. Retrieved June 29, 2010.
  2. ^ Meyer, K. (1990). Pundits, poets, and wits. New York: Oxford University Press.
  3. ^ Swope, H. B. as quoted in Meyer, K. (1990). Pundits, poets, and wits. New York: Oxford University Press, p. xxxvii.
  4. ^ "A press scholar explains how the New York Times op-ed page began". Slate. September 27, 2010. Retrieved August 9, 2012.
  5. ^ Shipley, David (1 February 2004). "And Now a Word From Op-Ed". The New York Times.
  6. ^ Socolow, Michael J. (2010). "A Profitable Public Sphere: The Creation of the New York Times Op-Ed Page". Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly. University of Maine.
  7. ^ "'Journalism'". Grolier Multimedia Encyclopedia. 2010. (Registration required (help)).
  8. ^ "US journalists launch campaign for 'op-ed transparency'". The Guardian. October 11, 2011. Retrieved August 9, 2012.
  9. ^ "Journos call for more transparency at New York Times op-ed page". Columbia Journalism Review. October 6, 2011. Retrieved August 9, 2012.

External links

Barry Blitt

Barry Blitt (born April 30, 1958 in Côte Saint-Luc, Quebec) is a Canadian-born American artist.

Barry Blitt is a cartoonist and illustrator, best known for his New Yorker covers and as a regular contributor to the op-ed page of The New York Times. Blitt creates his works in traditional pen and ink, as well as watercolors.

Brad Holland (artist)

Brad Holland (born 1943) is an American artist. His work has appeared in Time, Vanity Fair, The New Yorker, Playboy, Rolling Stone, The New York Times, and many other national and international publications. His paintings have been exhibited in museums around the world, including one-man exhibitions at the Musée des Beaux-Arts, Clermont-Ferrand, France; The Museum of American Illustration, New York City.

Daily Times (Pakistan)

The Daily Times (DT) is an English-language Pakistani newspaper. Launched on April 9, 2002, Daily Times, which is simultaneously published from Lahore, Islamabad and Karachi, is edited by Raza Rumi. The newspaper was owned by Governor of Punjab and Pakistan Peoples Party stalwart Salmaan Taseer.

Editorial

An editorial, leading article (US) or leader (UK), is an article written by the senior editorial staff or publisher of a newspaper, magazine, or any other written document, often unsigned. Australian and major United States newspapers, such as The New York Times and The Boston Globe, often classify editorials under the heading "opinion".

Illustrated editorials may appear in the form of editorial cartoons.Typically, a newspaper's editorial board evaluates which issues are important for their readership to know the newspaper's opinion on.Editorials are typically published on a dedicated page, called the editorial page, which often features letters to the editor from members of the public; the page opposite this page is called the op-ed page and frequently contains opinion pieces by writers not directly affiliated with the publication. However, a newspaper may choose to publish an editorial on the front page. In the English-language press, this occurs rarely and only on topics considered especially important; it is more common, however, in some European countries such as Spain, Italy, and France.Many newspapers publish their editorials without the name of the leader writer. Tom Clark, leader-writer for The Guardian, argues that it ensures that readers discuss the issue at hand rather than the author. On the other hand, an editorial does reflect the position of a newspaper and the head of the newspaper, the editor, is known by name. Whilst the editor will often not write the editorial themselves, they maintain oversight and retain responsibility.When The Press, a New Zealand newspaper based in Christchurch, changed after 157 years from broadsheet to compact in 2018, they published a list of editorials where current thinking differs from opinions expressed at the time. The starkest example was their view on women's suffrage in New Zealand after the government gave women the vote in 1893, where the editorial proclaimed that women would "much prefer staying at home and attending to their household duties" than going to the polling booths.

In the field of fashion publishing, the term is often used to refer to photo-editorials – features with often full-page photographs on a particular theme, designer, model or other single topic, with or (as in a photo-essay) without accompanying text.

Frank Bruni

Frank Anthony Bruni (born October 31, 1964) is an American journalist and long-time writer for The New York Times. In June 2011, he was named an op-ed columnist for the newspaper. His columns appear twice weekly and he also writes a weekly newsletter.

One of his many previous posts for the newspaper was as its chief restaurant critic, from 2004 to 2009. He is the author of three bestselling books: Born Round, a memoir about his family's love of food and his own struggles with overeating; Where You Go Is Not Who You'll Be, about the college admissions mania; and Ambling Into History, about George W. Bush. He is currently a CNN contributor.

Gail Collins

Gail Collins (born November 25, 1945) is an American journalist, op-ed columnist and author, most recognized for her work with the New York Times. Joining the Times in 1995 as a member of the editorial board, from 2001 to 2007 she served as the paper's Editorial Page Editor – the first woman to attain that position.Collins writes a semi-weekly op-ed column for the Times from her liberal perspective, published Thursdays and Saturdays. In 2014 she co-authored a blog with conservative journalist David Brooks entitled "The Conversation," at NYTimes.com, featuring bi-partisan political commentary.

Henry Louis Gates Jr.

Henry Louis "Skip" Gates Jr. (born September 16, 1950) is an American literary critic, teacher, historian, filmmaker and public intellectual who currently serves as the Alphonse Fletcher University Professor and Director of the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research at Harvard University. He discovered what are considered the first books by African-American writers, both women, and has published extensively on appreciating African-American literature as part of the Western canon.

In addition to producing and hosting previous series on the history and genealogy of prominent American figures, since 2012 Gates has been host for four seasons of the series Finding Your Roots on PBS. It combines the work of expert researchers in genealogy, history, and genetics historic research to tell guests about their ancestors' lives and histories.

I Am Part of the Resistance Inside the Trump Administration

"I Am Part of the Resistance Inside the Trump Administration" is an anonymous essay published by The New York Times on September 5, 2018. The author is described as a senior official working for the administration of Donald Trump.

The op-ed criticizes Trump and says that many current members of the administration deliberately disobey or ignore his suggestions and orders for the good of the country. It also says that some cabinet members in the early days of the administration discussed using the Twenty-fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution as a way to remove the President from power.

The New York Times editorial board said that it knows the author's identity but granted the person anonymity to protect them from reprisal. The publication of this editorial was unusual because few New York Times pieces have been anonymously written.

Interventions

Interventions is a book by Noam Chomsky, an American linguist, MIT professor, and political activist. Published in May 2007, Interventions is a collection of 44 op-ed articles, post-9/11, from September 2002, through March 2007. The book's subjects span from 9/11 and the Iraq War to social security and intelligent design, South America and Asia, the Israeli occupation of Palestine and the election of Hamas, Hurricane Katrina, and the US concept of "just war". The Pentagon banned the book from its Guantanamo Bay prison because it might negatively "impact... good order and discipline." Chomsky replied that, "This happens sometimes in totalitarian regimes."

James Bamford

James Bamford (born September 15, 1946) is an American bestselling author, journalist and documentary producer widely noted for his writing about United States intelligence agencies, especially the National Security Agency (NSA). The New York Times has called him "the nation's premier journalist on the subject of the National Security Agency" and in a lengthy profile The New Yorker named him "the NSA's chief chronicler." Bamford has taught at the University of California, Berkeley as a distinguished visiting professor and has written for The New York Times Magazine, The Atlantic, Harper's, and many other publications. In 2006, he won the National Magazine Award for Reporting, the highest award in the magazine industry, for his writing on the war in Iraq published in Rolling Stone. He is also an Emmy nominated documentary producer for PBS and spent a decade as the Washington investigative producer for ABC's World News Tonight. In 2015 he became the national security columnist for Foreign Policy Magazine and he also writes for The New Republic. His most recent book, The Shadow Factory: The Ultra-Secret NSA From 9/11 to the Eavesdropping on America, became a New York Times bestseller and was named by The Washington Post as one of "The Best Books of the Year." It is the third in a trilogy by Bamford on the NSA, following The Puzzle Palace (1982) and Body of Secrets (2001), also New York Times bestsellers.

Joe Nocera

Joseph "Joe" Nocera (born May 6, 1952 in Providence, Rhode Island) is an American business journalist and author. He writes about sports at The New York Times where he previously wrote about business and was a columnist for the newspaper's Op-Ed page. Nocera is also a business commentator for NPR’s Weekend Edition and, as of January 2017, for Bloomberg View.

Maja Novak

Maja Novak (born 23 April 1960) is a Slovenian writer, translator and journalist.Born in the industrial town of Jesenice, she grew up in Nova Gorica, a planned town on the Yugoslav-Italian border. She studied business law at the University of Ljubljana and worked as business secretary in Jordan before settling in Ljubljana, where she works as a journalist.

She started publishing short stories in the early 1990s. She has published four novels: Izza kongresa, ali umor v teritorialnih vodah (Behind the Congress, or Murder in Territorial Waters, 1993), Cimre (Roommates, 1995), Kafarnaum (Capernaum, 1998), and Mačja kuga (The Feline Plague, 2000), as well as the collection of short prose Zverinjad (Wild Beasts, 1996) and three books for children.Her novel Mačja kuga (The Feline Plague) has been praised as a literary masterpiece.She has translated authors from French (such as Gaston Leroux), Italian (such as Alessandro Baricco, Susanna Tamaro, and Giacomo Casanova), Serbian (such as Vladimir Arsenijević), and English (such as Helen Fielding, Alain de Botton, and Terry Pratchett).She writes a regular op-ed column in the weekly left-wing current affairs magazine Mladina.

Maureen Dowd

Maureen Brigid Dowd (; born January 14, 1952) is an American columnist for The New York Times and an author.

During the 1970s and the early 1980s, Dowd worked for Time magazine and the Washington Star, where she covered news and sports and wrote feature articles. Dowd joined The New York Times in 1983 as a Metropolitan Reporter, and became an op-ed writer for the newspaper in 1995. In 1999, Dowd was awarded a Pulitzer Prize for her series of columns on the Monica Lewinsky scandal in the Clinton administration.

Mayim Bialik

Mayim Chaya Bialik ( MY-əm bee-AH-lik; born December 12, 1975) is an American actress, author, and neuroscientist. From 1991 to 1995, she played the title character of the NBC sitcom Blossom. Since 2010, she has played Amy Farrah Fowler – like the actress, a neuroscientist – on the CBS sitcom The Big Bang Theory, a role for which she has been nominated four times for the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series, and won the Critics' Choice Television Award for Best Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series in 2015 and 2016.

Project Syndicate

Project Syndicate is an international media organization that publishes and syndicates commentary and analysis on a variety of important global topics. All opinion pieces are published on the Project Syndicate website, but are also distributed to a wide network of partner publications for print. As of 2016, it has a network of 459 media outlets in 155 countries.Project Syndicate, which Ezra Klein described as "the world's smartest op-ed page," provides commentaries on a wide range of topics, from economic policy and strategies for growth worldwide to human rights, Islam, and the environment. It also offers monthly series dedicated to Africa, Europe, Asia, and Latin America, as well as to China and Russia. RealClearWorld also named Project Syndicate one of the top five world news sites for 2012.A non-profit organization, Project Syndicate relies primarily on contributions from newspapers in developed countries,which make up roughly 60% of its membership base, to enable it to offer its services at reduced rates, or for free, to newspapers in countries where journalistic resources may not be readily available. Project Syndicate has also received grants from the Open Society Foundation, The Politiken Foundation in Denmark, Die Zeit, ZEIT-Stiftung, and The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.Project Syndicate translates its columns from English into 13 languages, including Arabic, Chinese, Czech, Dutch, French, German, Hindi, Indonesian, Italian, Kazakh, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish. More than half of Project Syndicate's partners receive their content at a discounted rate, enabling relevant and valuable content to reach readers in areas where media freedom and funding are restricted.

Stuart Rothenberg

Stuart Rothenberg is an American editor, publisher, and political analyst. He is best known for his biweekly political newsletter The Rothenberg Political Report, now known as Inside Elections. He was as also regular columnist at Roll Call and an occasional op-ed contributor to other publications, including The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, The New York Times, and The Orlando Sentinel.

The New York Sun

The New York Sun was an American daily newspaper published in Manhattan from 2002 to 2008. It debuted on April 16, 2002, adopting the name, motto, and masthead of the earlier New York paper, The Sun (1833–1950). It became the first general-interest broadsheet newspaper to be started in New York City in several decades. Its op-ed page became a prominent platform in the country for conservative viewpoints. Since 2009 The Sun has operated as an online-only publisher of political and economic opinion pieces, as well as occasional arts content.

Timothy Egan

Timothy Egan (born November 8, 1954) is an American author, journalist and op-ed columnist for The New York Times, writing from a liberal perspective.Egan has written seven books. His first, The Good Rain, won the Pacific Northwest Booksellers Association Award in 1991. For The Worst Hard Time, a 2006 book about people who lived through the Great Depression's Dust Bowl, he won the National Book Award for Nonfiction and the Washington State Book Award in History/Biography. The Big Burn: Teddy Roosevelt and the Fire that Saved America (2009) is about the Great Fire of 1910, which burned about three million acres (12,000 km²) and helped shape the United States Forest Service. The book describes some of the political issues facing Theodore Roosevelt. For this work he won a second Washington State Book Award in History/Biography and a second Pacific Northwest Booksellers Association Award.In 2001, The New York Times won a Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting for a series to which Egan contributed, "How Race is Lived in America".Egan lives in Seattle. He is a weekly op-ed writer for The New York Times.

Yale Law Journal

The Yale Law Journal is a student-run law review affiliated with the Yale Law School. Published continuously since 1891, it is the most widely known of the eight law reviews published by students at Yale Law School. The journal is one of the most cited legal publications in the nation and usually generates the highest number of citations per published article.The journal, which is published eight times per year, contains articles, essays, features, and book reviews by professional legal scholars as well as student-written notes and comments. It is edited entirely by students. The journal has an online companion, the Yale Law Journal Online, which features op-ed length pieces and responses from scholars, practitioners, and policymakers. Prior to 2009, the Yale Law Journal Online was known as The Pocket Part.

The Yale Law Journal, in conjunction with the Harvard Law Review, the Columbia Law Review, and the University of Pennsylvania Law Review, publishes the Bluebook: A Uniform System of Citation, the most widely followed authority for legal citation formats in the United States.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.