One Day International

A One Day International (ODI) is a form of limited overs cricket, played between two teams with international status, in which each team faces a fixed number of overs, usually 50. The Cricket World Cup is played in this format, which is generally held every four years. One Day International matches are also called Limited Overs Internationals (LOI), although this generic term may also refer to Twenty20 International matches. They are major matches and considered the highest standard of List A, limited overs competition.

The international one-day game is a late-twentieth-century development. The first ODI was played on 5 January 1971 between Australia and England at the Melbourne Cricket Ground. When the first three days of the third Test were washed out officials decided to abandon the match and, instead, play a one-off one-day game consisting of 40 eight-ball overs per side. Australia won the game by 5 wickets. ODIs were played in white kits with a red ball.[1]

In the late 1970s, Kerry Packer established the rival World Series Cricket competition, and it introduced many of the features of One Day International cricket that are now commonplace, including coloured uniforms, matches played at night under floodlights with a white ball and dark sight screens, and, for television broadcasts, multiple camera angles, effects microphones to capture sounds from the players on the pitch, and on-screen graphics. The first of the matches with coloured uniforms was the WSC Australians in wattle gold versus WSC West Indians in coral pink, played at VFL Park in Melbourne on 17 January 1979. This led not only to Packer's Channel 9 getting the TV rights to cricket in Australia but also led to players worldwide being paid to play, and becoming international professionals, no longer needing jobs outside cricket. Matches played with coloured kits and a white ball became more commonplace over time, and the use of white flannels and a red ball in ODIs ended in 2001.

Australia vs India
The Melbourne Cricket Ground hosts an ODI match between Australia and India. The Australians, wearing yellow, are the batsmen, while India, wearing blue, are the fielding team.
MCG under lights
An ODI match at the MCG, being played under floodlights.
ICC ODI Rankings
Rank Team Matches Points Rating
1  England 59 7,259 123
2  India 71 8,508 120
3  New Zealand 54 6,071 112
4  South Africa 55 6,181 112
5  Australia 53 5,701 108
6  Pakistan 43 5,147 97
7  Bangladesh 42 3,792 90
8  Sri Lanka 62 4,734 76
9  West Indies 44 3,351 76
10  Afghanistan 40 2,554 64
11  Zimbabwe 48 2,497 52
12  Ireland 27 1,169 43
13  Scotland 16 535 33
14  United Arab Emirates 17 263 15
15    Nepal 10 152 15
16  Netherlands 6 50 8
Matches is the number of matches played in the 12-24 months since the May before last, plus half the number in the 24 months before that. See points calculations for more details.
Reference: Cricinfo Rankings page,ICC ODI rankings 2 April 2019

Rules

In the main the Laws of cricket apply. However, in ODIs, each team bats for a fixed number of overs. In the early days of ODI cricket, the number of overs was generally 60 overs per side, and matches were also played with 40, 45 or 55 overs per side, but now it has been uniformly fixed at 50 overs.

Simply stated, the game works as follows:[2]

  • An ODI is contested by two teams of 11 players each.
  • The Captain of the side winning the toss chooses to either bat or bowl (field) first.
  • The team batting first sets the target score in a single innings. The innings lasts until the batting side is "all out" (i.e., 10 of the 11 batting players are "out") or all of the first side's allotted overs are completed.
  • Each bowler is restricted to bowling a maximum of 10 overs (fewer in the case of rain-reduced matches and in any event generally no more than one fifth or 20% of the total overs per innings). Therefore, each team must comprise at least five competent bowlers (either dedicated bowlers or all-rounders).
  • The team batting second tries to score more than the target score in order to win the match. Similarly, the side bowling second tries to bowl out the second team or make them exhaust their overs before they reach the target score in order to win.
  • If the number of runs scored by both teams is equal when the second team loses all its wickets or exhausts all its overs, then the game is declared a tie (regardless of the number of wickets lost by either team).

Where a number of overs are lost, for example, due to inclement weather conditions, then the total number of overs may be reduced. In the early days of ODI cricket, the team with the better run rate won (see Average Run Rate method), but this favoured the second team.[3] For the 1992 World Cup, an alternative method was used of simply omitting the first team's worst overs (see Most Productive Overs method), but that favoured the first team.[3][4] Since the late 1990s, the target or result is usually determined by the Duckworth-Lewis (DL) method,[3] which is a method with statistical approach. It takes into consideration the fact that the wickets in hand plays a crucial role in pacing the run-rate. In other words, a team with more wickets in hand can play way more aggressively than the team with fewer wickets in hand. When insufficient overs are played to apply the Duckworth-Lewis method, a match is declared no result. Important one-day matches, particularly in the latter stages of major tournaments, may have two days set aside, such that a result can be achieved on the "reserve day" if the first day is washed out—either by playing a new game, or by resuming the match which was rain-interrupted. The original DL-method however had a few inherent flaws. For example, Tony Lewis, one of the formulators of this method recognized after the match between India and Kenya during the 1999 World Cup held in Bristol, that the original method gave an unfair advantage to the team chasing scores above 350 runs in a 50 overs match (and likewise scores in other formats). Hence, the method was revised and a new version was released in 2004. There was one more such change made which was first implemented on 2009. Off late (as up to 9 August 2018), the Duckworth-Lewis-Stern (DLS) method is widely used, which is a modification of the DL-Method suggested by Prof. Steven Stern. It was first implemented during the 2015 World Cup. One of the major changes made to DLS from DL method was based on a historic analysis by Prof. Stern that a team with higher run rate in their initial stages has a greater chance to get to a high score than a team with slow initial run rate, but more wickets in hand.

Because the game uses a white ball instead of the red one used in first-class cricket, the ball can become discoloured and hard to see as the innings progresses, so the ICC has used various rules to help keep the ball playable. Most recently, ICC has made the use of two new balls (one from each end), the same strategy that was used in the 1992 and 1996 World Cups so that each ball is used for only 25 overs.[5] Previously, in October 2007, the ICC sanctioned that after the 34th over, the ball would be replaced with a cleaned previously-used ball.[6] Before October 2007 (except 1992 and 1996 World Cups), only one ball would be used during an innings of an ODI and it was up to the umpire to decide whether to change the ball.[2]

Fielding restrictions and powerplays

Cricket field parts
A limited number of fielders are allowed in the outfield during powerplays.

The bowling side is subjected to fielding restrictions during an ODI, in order to prevent teams from setting wholly defensive fields. Fielding restrictions dictate the maximum number of fieldsmen allowed to be outside the thirty-yard circle.

Under current ODI rules, there are three levels of fielding restrictions:

  • In the first 10 overs of an innings (the mandatory powerplay), the fielding team may have at most two fielders outside the 30-yard circle.[7]
  • Between 11 and 40 overs four fielders will be allowed to field outside the 30-yard circle.[8]
  • In final 10 overs five fielders will be allowed to field outside the 30-yard circle.[9][10]

Where a match is shortened by rain, the duration of the powerplays is adjusted to equal 30% of the team's overs wherever possible (20% for the first powerplay, 10% for the second).

History

Fielding restrictions were first introduced in the Australian 1980–81 season.[11] By 1992, only two fieldsmen were allowed outside the circle in the first fifteen overs, then five fieldsmen allowed outside the circle for the remaining overs.[12] This was shortened to ten overs in 2005, and two five-over powerplays were introduced, with the bowling team having discretion over the timing for both. In 2008, the batting team was given discretion for the timing of one of the two powerplays. In 2011, the teams were restricted to completing the discretionary powerplays between the 16th and 40th overs; previously, the powerplays could take place at any time between the 11th and 50th overs. Finally, in 2012, the bowling powerplay was abandoned, and the number of fielders allowed outside the 30-yard circle during non-powerplay overs was reduced from five to four.[2][13]

Trial regulations

The trial regulations also introduced a substitution rule that allowed the introduction of a replacement player at any stage in the match and until he was called up to play he assumed the role of 12th man. Teams nominated their replacement player, called a Supersub, before the toss. The Supersub could bat, bowl, field or keep wicket once a player was replaced; the replaced player took over the role of 12th man. Over the six months it was in operation, it became very clear that the Supersub was of far more benefit to the side that won the toss, unbalancing the game. Several international captains reached "gentleman's agreements" to discontinue this rule late in 2005. They continued to name Supersubs, as required, but they did not field them by simply using them as a normal 12th man. On 15 February 2006, the ICC announced their intention to discontinue the Supersub rule on 21 March 2006.[14]

Teams with ODI status

The International Cricket Council (ICC) determines which teams have ODI status (meaning that any match played between two such teams under standard one-day rules is classified as an ODI).

Permanent ODI status

The twelve Test-playing nations (which are also the twelve full members of the ICC) have permanent ODI status. The nations are listed below with the date of each nation's ODI debut after gaining full ODI status shown in brackets (Sri Lanka, Zimbabwe, Bangladesh, Ireland, and Afghanistan were ICC associate members at the times of their ODI debuts):

  1.  Australia (5 January 1971)
  2.  England (5 January 1971)
  3.  New Zealand (11 February 1973)
  4.  Pakistan (11 February 1973)
  5.  West Indies (5 September 1973)
  6.  India (13 July 1974)
  7.  Sri Lanka (13 February 1982)
  8.  South Africa (10 November 1991)
  9.  Zimbabwe (25 October 1992)
  10.  Bangladesh (10 October 1997)
  11.  Afghanistan (5 December 2017)
  12.  Ireland (5 December 2017)

Temporary ODI status

Between 2005 and 2017 the ICC granted temporary ODI status to six other teams (known as Associate members). In 2017 this was changed to four teams, following the promotion of Afghanistan and Ireland to Test status (and permanent ODI status). The ICC had previously decided to limit ODI status to 16 teams.[15] Teams earn this temporary status for a period of four years based on their performance in the ICC World Cup Qualifier, which is the final event of the ICC World Cricket League. The following four teams currently have this status (the dates listed in brackets are of their first ODI match after gaining temporary ODI status):

So far, eight teams have held this temporary ODI status before either being promoted to Test status or relegated after under-performing at the World Cup Qualifier:

Relegated

The ICC occasionally granted associate members permanent ODI status without granting them full membership and Test status. This was originally introduced to allow the best associate members to gain regular experience in internationals before making the step up to full membership. First Bangladesh and then Kenya received this status. Bangladesh have since made the step up to Test status and full membership; but as a result of disputes and poor performances, Kenya's ODI status was reduced to temporary in 2005, meaning that it had to perform well at World Cup Qualifiers to keep ODI status. Kenya lost ODI status after finishing in fifth place at the 2014 Cricket World Cup Qualifier event.[16]

Special ODI status

The ICC can also grant special ODI status to all matches within certain high-profile tournaments, with the result being that the following countries have also participated in full ODIs, with some later gaining temporary or permanent ODI status also fitting into this category:

Finally, since 2005, three composite teams have played matches with full ODI status. These matches were:

See also

References

  1. ^ England in India 2011–12: MS Dhoni says it will be tricky adjusting to the new playing conditions | Cricket News | India v England Archived 16 October 2011 at the Wayback Machine. ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved on 23 December 2013.
  2. ^ a b c "Standard One Day International match Playing Conditions" (PDF). International Cricket Council. Archived (PDF) from the original on 7 April 2014. Retrieved 6 April 2014.
  3. ^ a b c "The D/L method: answers to frequently asked questions". ESPN Cricinfo. September 2012. Archived from the original on 24 September 2015. Retrieved 16 January 2015.
  4. ^ "The World Cup rain-rule farce". ESPN Cricinfo. 26 March 2011. Archived from the original on 16 January 2015. Retrieved 16 January 2015.
  5. ^ "New rules to take effect from Oct 1". Cricbuzz. 1 October 2011. Retrieved 16 January 2015.
  6. ^ "New cricket ball change rule gets thumbs down from Ponting". Cricbuzz. 16 October 2007. Retrieved 16 January 2015.
  7. ^ "ICC gets rid of batting power play, five fielders allowed outside circle in last 10 overs of ODIs". Ibnlive.com. 27 June 2015. Archived from the original on 29 June 2015. Retrieved 14 June 2017.
  8. ^ Nagraj Gollapudi. "Bowlers benefit from ODI rule changes | Cricket". ESPN Cricinfo. Archived from the original on 28 June 2015. Retrieved 14 June 2017.
  9. ^ "ICC do away with Batting Powerplay in ODIs". Cricbuzz.com. Retrieved 14 June 2017.
  10. ^ "ICC remove batting powerplays from ODIs to 'maintain a balance between bat and ball' | The National". Thenational.ae. 27 June 2015. Archived from the original on 30 June 2015. Retrieved 14 June 2017.
  11. ^ "One-Day Cricket". CricTrivia.com. December 2005. Archived from the original on 9 February 2015. Retrieved 16 January 2015.
  12. ^ "Colourful cricket, and that rain rule". ESPN Cric Info. Archived from the original on 21 June 2014. Retrieved 6 April 2014.
  13. ^ "New ICC Rules for ODIs 2013". Archived from the original on 8 January 2013. Retrieved 2 February 2013.
  14. ^ "ICC agrees to drop super-sub rule". BBC Sport. 20 March 2006. Retrieved 4 January 2015.
  15. ^ ICC rule no change to ODI status for World Cup Qualifiers Archived 16 February 2018 at the Wayback Machine. ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved on 16 February 2018.
  16. ^ "Kenya to lose ODI member status". ESPNcricinfo. 18 March 2005. Archived from the original on 18 April 2018. Retrieved 18 April 2018.

External links

AB de Villiers

Abraham Benjamin de Villiers (born 17 February 1984), commonly known as AB de Villiers, is a former South African cricketer who played for the [[South African national cricket team|South African national team]. He holds many batting records, including the world's fastest One-Day International (ODI) 50, 100 and 150, the fastest Test century by a South African and the fastest Twenty20 International (T20 International) 50 by a South African batsman. He also plays for Titans in South African domestic cricket and Royal Challengers Bangalore in the Indian Premier League. He is also known as "Mr. 360°" due to his ability of playing shots in all parts of the field.

He began his international career as a wicket-keeper/batsman (returning to the role for a few years in mid-career), but he has played most often solely as a batsman. He could bat at various positions in the batting order but predominantly in the middle-order. Noted as one of the most innovative batsmen in the modern game, de Villiers is noted for many unorthodox shots behind the wicket-keeper and slips. He made his international debut in a Test match against England from 2004 and first played an ODI in early 2005. His debut in Twenty20 International cricket came in 2006. As of 2016, he has passed 8,000 runs in both Test and ODI cricket and has a batting average of over fifty in both forms of the game. He is also the only batsman in ODI cricket to have completed a trio of 5000+ runs, 50+ average and 100+ strike rate in his career. As of May 2018, from the date of his international debut onwards, he has scored 20,014 runs in international cricket. Within the same period he lies just second behind Kumar Sangakkara.AB De Villiers captained South Africa in all formats, but since his injuries, he stepped down from Test captaincy and continued in ODI and T20 . However, with defeats in the 2017 ICC Champions Trophy and England series, he stepped down from ODI and T20 captaincy as well. On 23 May 2018, he announced that he was retiring from all forms of international cricket.

Century (cricket)

In the sport of cricket, a century is a score of 100 or more runs in a single innings by a batsman. The term is also included in "century partnership" which occurs when two batsmen add 100 runs to the team total when they are batting together. A century is regarded as a landmark score for batsmen and a player's number of centuries is generally recorded in his career statistics. Scoring a century is loosely equivalent in merit to a bowler taking five wickets in an innings, and is commonly referred to as a ton or hundred. Scores of more than 200 runs are still statistically counted as a century, although these scores are referred as double (200–299 runs), triple (300–399 runs), and quadruple centuries (400–499 runs), and so on.

Accordingly, reaching 50 runs in an innings is known as a half-century; if the batsman then goes on to score a century, the half-century is succeeded in statistics by the century. Chris Gayle holds the record of fastest hundred in the history of cricket when he smashed 100 in just 30 balls and scored 175* runs off 66 balls overall in 20 overs in IPL against Pune Warriors India in 2013.

Chris Gayle

Christopher Henry Gayle, OD (born 21 September 1979) is a Jamaican cricketer who plays international cricket for the West Indies. Gayle captained the West Indies' Test side from 2007 to 2010. Considered as one of the greatest batsmen ever in Twenty20 (T20) cricket, Gayle has set numerous records across all three formats of cricket. He is widely acknowledged as one of the most clinical and destructive batsman in the history of the game, particularly in Twenty20. He is well known for hitting sixes, in 2012 he became the first player to hit a six off the first ball of a Test match. He holds the record for hitting the most sixes(515) in international cricket. He is the first batsman in the world to smash 10,000 runs in T20 cricket. He is the only player in the world to score a hundred in T20I, a double hundred in ODI and a triple hundred in Test Cricket.

He is one of only four players who have scored two triple centuries at Test level: 317 against South Africa in 2005, and 333 against Sri Lanka in 2010. Gayle became the first batsman in World Cup history to score a double century when he reached 200 off 138 balls against Zimbabwe during the 2015 World Cup. He finished on 215 runs, which was the record for highest score in a World Cup until it was broken by Martin Guptill against Gayle's own team. He is one of the six players to score a double century in ODIs. In March 2016, Gayle became only the second player (after Brendon McCullum) to hit two Twenty20 International hundreds, scoring 100 not out against England.

He plays domestic cricket for Jamaica, and also represents the Kings XI Punjab in the Indian Premier League, the Karachi Kings in the Pakistan Super League, the Melbourne Renegades in the Big Bash League, the Rangpur Riders in the Bangladesh Premier League, Jozi Stars in Mzansi Super League, Vancouver Knights in Global T20 Canada and the Balkh Legends in the Afghanistan Premier League. He has also represented Worcestershire, the Western Warriors, Sydney Thunder, Barisal Burners, Rangpur Riders, Dhaka Gladiators, Royal Challengers Bangalore, Kolkata Knight Riders and Somerset in his career.

In February 2019, Gayle announced that he will retire from ODIs after the 2019 Cricket World Cup. Later the same month, in the series against England, Gayle scored his 10,000th run and his 25th century in ODIs.

Cricket World Cup

The ICC Cricket World Cup is the international championship of One Day International (ODI) cricket. The event is organised by the sport's governing body, the International Cricket Council (ICC), every four years, with preliminary qualification rounds leading up to a finals tournament. The tournament is one of the world's most viewed sporting events and is considered the "flagship event of the international cricket calendar" by the ICC.The first World Cup was organised in England in June 1975, with the first ODI cricket match having been played only four years earlier. However, a separate Women's Cricket World Cup had been held two years before the first men's tournament, and a tournament involving multiple international teams had been held as early as 1912, when a triangular tournament of Test matches was played between Australia, England and South Africa. The first three World Cups were held in England. From the 1987 tournament onwards, hosting has been shared between countries under an unofficial rotation system, with fourteen ICC members having hosted at least one match in the tournament.

The World Cup is open to all members of the International Cricket Council (ICC), although the highest-ranking teams receive automatic qualification. The remaining teams are determined via the World Cricket League and the ICC World Cup Qualifier. A total of twenty teams have competed in the eleven editions of the tournament, with fourteen competing in the latest edition in 2015; the next edition in 2019 will have only ten teams. Australia has won the tournament five times, with the West Indies, India (twice each), Pakistan and Sri Lanka (once each) also having won the tournament. The best performance by a non-full-member team came when Kenya made the semi-finals of the 2003 tournament.

Dale Steyn

Dale Willem Steyn (; born 27 June 1983) is a South African cricketer who plays all formats of the game. He is widely regarded as one of the greatest fast bowlers of all time. He currently has the best bowling strike rate of all time in Test match cricket (amongst bowlers who have bowled a minimum of 10,000 deliveries). Steyn achieved a tally of 78 wickets at an average of 16.24 in Season 2007/08 and was subsequently rewarded with the prestigious ICC 2008 Test Cricketer of the Year Award. He was named one of the Wisden cricketers of the year in 2013.

He was named Wisden Leading Cricketer in the World for the year 2013 in 2014 Wisden Cricketers' Almanack.Steyn dominated the number one spot in the ICC test rankings during the peak of his career, for a record 263 weeks between 2008 and 2014. Sri Lankan Muttiah Muralitharan sits next on the list with 214 weeks. In terms of days, Steyn has spent 2,356 days at the top as of 6 October 2016, the most by any bowler since World War II. In October 2012, former South African test cricketer Allan Donald called the South African pace attack, which Steyn was part of, alongside Vernon Philander and Morne Morkel, the best South Africa has ever produced. Steyn played a cameo as himself in the 2014 Hollywood film Blended. In December 2018, during the first Test against Pakistan, Steyn became the leading wicket taker for South Africa in Test cricket, previously held by all-rounder and former-captain Shaun Pollock.

Imran Tahir

Mohammad Imran Tahir (Urdu: عمران طاہر‎; born 27 March 1979) is a Pakistani born South African cricketer. A spin bowler who predominantly bowls googlies and a right-handed batsman, Tahir currently plays for South Africa in ODI and T20 formats while also representing the Hollywoodbets Dolphins in South Africa, Multan Sultans in the Pakistan Super League, Guyana Amazon Warriors in the Caribbean Premier League and Chennai Super Kings in the Indian Premier League.

On 15 June 2016, Tahir became the first South African bowler to take seven wickets in an ODI, and also the fastest South African to reach 100 ODI wickets (58 matches).On 17 February 2017, Tahir became the fastest South African to reach 50 T20I wickets. On 4 March 2017, against New Zealand he recorded the most economical figures by a South African spinner in an ODI, with 2 wickets for 14 runs from 10 overs.On 3 October 2018, he became the fourth bowler for South Africa to take a hat-trick in ODIs. In March 2019, he announced that he would quit ODI cricket following the 2019 Cricket World Cup.

K. L. Rahul

Kannur Lokesh Rahul (born 18 April 1992), commonly known as KL Rahul, is an Indian cricketer. A top-order batsman and occasional wicket-keeper, he plays for India internationally, Karnataka in domestic circuit and Kings XI Punjab in the Indian Premier League.

After appearing for India at the 2010 ICC Under-19 Cricket World Cup, Rahul made his international debut against Australia in the 2014–15 Test series at Melbourne. In his second Test match at Sydney, he scored 110 and made his maiden Test century. He became the first Indian to score a century on One Day International debut, scoring 100* against Zimbabwe in 2016 at Harare Sports Club. He is only the third Indian batsman to score a century in all the three formats of International cricket. He is also the second-fastest batsman to score century in Twenty20, and the second-fastest Indian in all the formats, to score a century (100 for 46 balls), scoring 110* for 51 balls against West Indies on 27 August 2016 which is the second to highest score by an Indian in T20 internationals, after Rohit Sharma's knock of 118. Rahul is the only batsman to reach the score of 100 with a boundary on his maiden centuries in all the three formats of international cricket. He holds the record for the fastest 50 in the history of IPL off 14 balls against Delhi Daredevils.. Informative website

Kagiso Rabada

Kagiso Rabada (born 25 May 1995) is a South African international cricketer who plays all formats of the game. Rabada, who is known by the nickname KG, is a fast bowler and plays domestic cricket for the Highveld Lions. He made his South African debut in November 2014 in limited-overs cricket before going on to make his Test debut in November 2015. Rabada attended St Stithians Boys College, leaving the school in 2013. By January 2018, he had topped both the ICC ODI bowler rankings and the ICC Test bowler rankings aged 22. In July 2018, he became the youngest bowler to take 150 wickets in Tests (23 years and 50 days).In July 2016, Rabada became the first cricketer to win six awards at Cricket South Africa's (CSA) annual dinner, including the prize for Cricketer of the Year. In June 2018, he again won six awards at CSA's annual dinner, including Cricketer of the Year, Test Cricketer and ODI Cricketer of the Year. In August 2018, Wisden named him the best young player in the world.

List A cricket

List A cricket is a classification of the limited-overs (one-day) form of the sport of cricket. List A cricket includes One Day International (ODI) matches and various domestic competitions in which the number of overs in an innings per team ranges from forty to sixty, as well as some international matches involving nations who have not achieved official ODI status. Together with first-class and Twenty20 cricket, List A is one of the three major forms of cricket recognised by the International Cricket Council (ICC).

List of India ODI cricketers

A One Day International is a form of limited overs cricket, in which each team faces a fixed number of overs, usually 50, played between two international representative teams, each having ODI status, as determined by the International Cricket Council (ICC). The first ODI was played on 5 January 1971 between Australia and England at the Melbourne Cricket Ground. India is a full member of International Cricket Council and has a permanent ODI status. India played their first ODI in 1974 and a total of 227 players have represented the team. Since 1974 India has played 966 ODIs, resulting in 500 victories, 417 defeats, 9 ties and 40 no results. India registered their first series victory against England in a 3-match series by 2–1 in 1981. India won the Cricket World Cup twice in 1983 and 2011 and was runner-up in 2003. India won the ICC Champions Trophy in the year 2013 and had earlier shared once with Sri Lanka in 2002 because rain washed out the attempt to complete the final twice. India was also runner-up in 2000. India have won the Asia Cup (in ODI format) a total of six times in 1984, 1988, 1990, 1995, 2010 and 2018.Sachin Tendulkar is the youngest debutant at the age of 16 years and 238 days and Farokh Engineer is the oldest debutant at the age of 36 years and 138 days. Anil Kumble is the leading wicket taker with 337 wickets to his name, and Sachin Tendulkar is the leading run scorer with 18,426 runs to his name from 452 innings at an average of 44.83. Currently, Tendulkar holds the record for playing the most number of ODI matches with 463. He also holds the world record for maximum number of Man of the Match titles. In ODIs, 418/5 is the highest runs scored by India in an innings. India's lowest total in an innings while batting is 54 runs. Currently, Rohit Sharma's score of 264 against Sri Lanka in November 2014 is the highest number of runs scored by any player in an ODI.

List of India national cricket captains

India became a full member of the Imperial Cricket Conference (now the International Cricket) on 31 May 1926. On 25 June 1932 it became the sixth Test nation after England, Australia, South Africa, the West Indies and New Zealand.The Indian was first led by Colonel C.K. Nayudu against England at the Lord's.They played only seven tests, which were all against England, before the Second World War, losing five matches and drawing twice. Their first game against other opposition came in 1947–48 when Indians led by Lala Amarnath played against Sir Donald Bradman's Australia.

Ajit Wadekar became India's inaugural One Day International captain in 1974 against England at Headingley.Virendar Sehwag led India in its first T20I against South Africa in 2006 at Wanderers.He captained only for a single match. In 2007 he was replaced by M.S. Dhoni.

Santha Rangaswamy led the women's team in their first WTest match in 1976 against West Indies at M.Chinnaswamy Stadium. Diana Edulji was the first Women's One Day International captain in 1978 against England at Eden Gardens. Mithai Raj became the first WT20I captain in 2006 against England at Derby.

K. Srikkant became the first Test captain for the U-19 team in 1978-79 against Pakistan, while Ravi Shastri first One Day International captain for the U-19 team in 1981.

List of One Day International cricket records

One Day International (ODI) cricket is played between international cricket teams who are Full Members of the International Cricket Council (ICC) as well as the top four Associate members. Unlike Test matches, ODIs consist of one inning per team, having a limit in the number of overs, currently 50 overs per innings – although in the past this has been 55 or 60 overs. ODI cricket is List-A cricket, so statistics and records set in ODI matches also count toward List-A records. The earliest match recognised as an ODI was played between England and Australia in January 1971; since when there have been over 4,000 ODIs played by 26 teams. The frequency of matches has steadily increased, partly because of the increase in the number of ODI-playing countries, and partly as the cricket boards of those nations seek to maximise their revenue with the increased popularity of cricket, a process that dates from the time of the Packer Revolution.The most successful team in ODI cricket, in terms of win percentage (barring the Asia XI cricket team who have only played seven games) is South Africa, who overtook previous leaders Australia in 2017, and as of 16 July 2018 have a record of 63.69%. In contrast, three teams have failed to win a single ODI: East Africa, Namibia, and the USA, though they have only played eleven ODIs between them.

The trend of countries to increase the number of ODI matches they play means that the aggregate lists are dominated by modern players, though this trend is reversing as teams play more Twenty20 Internationals. Indian cricketer Sachin Tendulkar has scored the most runs in ODIs with a total of 18,426. Sri Lankan spinner Muttiah Muralitharan is the highest ODI wicket-taker with a total of 534 wickets. The record for most dismissals by a wicket-keeper is held by Kumar Sangakkara of Sri Lanka while the record for most catches by a fielder is held by Sri Lankan Mahela Jayawardene.

MS Dhoni

Mahendra Singh Dhoni (pronunciation ; commonly known as MS Dhoni; born 7 July 1981) is an Indian international cricketer who captained the Indian national team in limited-overs formats from 2007 to 2016 and in Test cricket from 2008 to 2014. An attacking right-handed middle-order batsman and wicket-keeper, he is widely regarded as one of the greatest finishers in limited-overs cricket. He is also regarded as one of the best wicket-keepers in world cricket. He made his One Day International (ODI) debut in December 2004 against Bangladesh, and played his first Test a year later against Sri Lanka.

Dhoni has been the recipient of many awards, including the ICC ODI Player of the Year award in 2008 and 2009 (the first player to win the award twice), the Rajiv Gandhi Khel Ratna award in 2007, the Padma Shri, India's fourth highest civilian honour, in 2009 and the Padma Bhushan, India's third highest civilian honour, in 2018. He was named as the captain of the ICC World Test XI in 2009, 2010 and 2013. He has also been selected a record 8 times in ICC World ODI XI teams, 5 times as captain. The Indian Territorial Army conferred the honorary rank of Lieutenant Colonel to Dhoni on 1 November 2011. He is the second Indian cricketer after Kapil Dev to receive this honour.

Dhoni also holds numerous captaincy records such as the most wins by an Indian captain in Tests, ODIs and T20Is, and most back-to-back wins by an Indian captain in ODIs. He took over the ODI captaincy from Rahul Dravid in 2007 and led the team to its first-ever bilateral ODI series wins in Sri Lanka and New Zealand. Under his captaincy, India won the 2007 ICC World Twenty20, 2007–08 Commonwealth Bank Series, the 2010 and 2016 Asia Cups, the 2011 ICC Cricket World Cup and the 2013 ICC Champions Trophy. In the final of the 2011 World Cup, Dhoni scored 91 not out off 79 balls handing India the victory for which he was awarded the Man of the Match. In June 2013, when India defeated England in the final of the Champions Trophy in England, Dhoni became the first captain to win all three ICC limited-overs trophies (World Cup, Champions Trophy and the World Twenty20). After taking up the Test captaincy in 2008, he led the team to series wins in New Zealand and the West Indies, and the Border-Gavaskar Trophy in 2008, 2010 and 2013. In 2009, Dhoni also led the Indian team to number one position for the first time in the ICC Test rankings. In 2013, under his captaincy, India became the first team in more than 40 years to whitewash Australia in a Test series. In the Indian Premier League, he captained the Chennai Super Kings to victory at the 2010, 2011 and 2018 seasons, along with wins in the 2010 and 2014 editions of Champions League Twenty20. He announced his retirement from Tests on 30 December 2014.In 2011, Time magazine included Dhoni in its annual Time 100 list as one of the "Most Influential People in the World." In 2012, SportsPro rated Dhoni as the sixteenth most marketable athlete in the world. In June 2015, Forbes ranked Dhoni at 23rd in the list of highest paid athletes in the world, estimating his earnings at US$31 million. In 2016, a biopic M.S. Dhoni: The Untold Story was made about him.

Dhoni holds the post of Vice-President of India Cements Ltd., after resigning from Air India. India Cements is the owner of the IPL team Chennai Super Kings, and Dhoni has been its captain since the first IPL season. Dhoni is the co-owner of Indian Super League team Chennaiyin FC.

Sanath Jayasuriya

Deshabandu Sanath Teran Jayasuriya (Sinhala: සනත් ටෙරාන් ජයසූරිය; born 30 June 1969) is a former Sri Lankan cricketer and a former captain of the Sri Lankan national team. Considered one of the greatest One Day International (ODI) players of all time, Jayasuriya is well known for his powerful striking and match winning all-round performances in ODI cricket. Jayasuriya is credited for having revolutionized one-day international cricket with his explosive batting with Romesh Kaluwitharana in 1996, which initiated the hard-hitting modern day batting strategy of all nations.Jayasuriya was an all-rounder, who had an international cricket career that spread over two decades, He is the only player to score over 12,000 runs and capture more than 300 wickets in One Day International cricket, and hence regarded as one of the best all rounders in the history of limited-overs cricket. He was named the Most Valuable Player of 1996 Cricket World Cup and Wisden Cricketers' Almanack broke an age old tradition by naming him one of Five Cricketers’ of the Year 1997 despite not playing the previous season in England. Jayasuriya was also the captain of the Sri Lankan cricket team from 1999 to 2003.

He retired from Test cricket in December 2007 and from limited overs cricket in June 2011. On 28 January 2013, Sri Lanka Cricket appointed him as the chairman of cricket selection committee. Sri Lanka won the ICC World Twenty20 for the first time in 2014, during his tenure as the chief selector.

Jayasuriya ran for public office at the 2010 Sri Lankan general elections and was elected to the parliament from his native Matara District. He topped the UPFA parliamentary election list for Matara district by obtaining 74,352 preferential votes.

He served as the deputy minister of Postal services in the former UPFA government led by Mahinda Rajapaksa, and later as the Deputy Minister of Local Government & Rural Development under president Maithripala Sirisena. Jayasuriya did not contest for the 2015 Sri Lankan general election, though he won most votes from Matara district under UPFA in the 2010 Sri Lankan general election.In February 2019, Jayasuriya was banned for two years in taking part in any cricket-related activity by the International Cricket Council's (ICC) anti-corruption unit, after he failed to co-operate in a corruption investigation.

Shaun Pollock

Shaun Maclean Pollock OIS (born 16 July 1973) is a South African cricket commentator and former cricketer and a former captain of all formats. A genuine bowling all-rounder, Pollock along with Allan Donald formed a formidable bowling partnership for many years. From 2000 to 2003 he was the captain of the South African cricket team, and also played for Africa XI, World XI, Dolphins and Warwickshire. He was chosen as the Wisden Cricketer of the Year in 2003.

On 11 January 2008 he announced his retirement from all forms of international cricket after his 303rd One Day International on 3 February. Pollock now works as a commentator on SuperSport’s coverage of South African cricket.

Stephen Fleming

Stephen Paul Fleming, ONZM (born 1 April 1973) is a New Zealand cricket coach and former cricketer, and captain of the New Zealand national cricket team in all three formats of the game.

Known for his astute tactical abilities, he is New Zealand's second-most capped Test player with 111 appearances, longest-serving and most successful captain, having led the side to 28 victories and having won Test match series' against India, England, West Indies, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh and Zimbabwe.

He is also the winning captain of the 2000 ICC KnockOut Trophy, which is New Zealand's only ICC trophy to win up to date. Fleming captained New Zealand in the historic first Twenty20 International of the world, which was played against Australia in 2005 as well.He retired from international cricket on 26 March 2008. Fleming played in the 2008 Indian Premier League for the Chennai Super Kings after being signed for US$350,000 and became the team's coach from 2009. In February 2015 he was signed as coach of the Melbourne Stars of the Big Bash League. On 19 January 2018 he resumed his duties as head coach of the Chennai Super Kings in 2018 Indian Premier League season again, after the team was barred from playing in the tournament for two seasons. He coached the Rising Pune Supergiant during this time.

Stuart Binny

Stuart Terence Roger Binny (born 3 June 1984) International Indian cricketer, who plays for One Day Internationals, Twenty20 Internationals, and Tests. He plays for the Rajasthan Royals in the Indian Premier League.

Sunil Narine

Sunil Philip Narine (born 26 May 1988) is a Trinidadian cricketer of Indian descent who plays for the West Indies. Primarily an off-spin bowler, he is also an aggressive left-handed batsman.Narine currently plays for Kolkata Knight Riders in the Indian Premier League (IPL), Dhaka Dynamites in the BPL, Trinbago Knight Riders in the CPL and Quetta Gladiators in the PSL. He made his One Day International (ODI) debut in December 2011 and Test debut in June 2012.

Women's One Day International cricket

Women's One Day International cricket (ODI) is the limited overs form of women's cricket. Matches are scheduled for 50 overs, equivalent to the men's game. The first women's ODIs were played in 1973, as part of the first Women's World Cup which was held in England. The first ODI saw the hosts beat an International XI. The 1,000th women's ODI took place between South Africa and New Zealand on 13 October 2016.

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