One-minute warning

The one-minute warning or the one-minute timing rule (now known as the "half-minute warning") is a rule in the Arena Football League and other indoor American football leagues that dictates the flow of the game in the final minute of a half, and throughout any overtime period through 2018;[1] since 2019, it occurs in last half-minute of regulation or overtime.[2]

At the half-minute mark of regulation or overtime, the referee announces: "Half-minute Timing Rule in effect". During the final half-minute of play, the game clock changes from a continuously running clock (except for scores and time-outs) to a clock that mirrors NCAA rules (stopping on first downs, out of bounds, incompletions, and so on.) Since 2018 teams can do "sandbagging" via the quarterback kneel, a tactic common in the NCAA and NFL to run out the clock with minimum risk. It also rewards defensive play, as a tackle for loss automatically stops the clock. Any player injured during this time and that team uses a timeout. In the former X-League, after the one-minute warning or in overtime, the "X-Bonus" rule came into play. All scoring during the final minute of play was worth double what it is normally worth, and a special black football was used.

References

  1. ^ John Ferlazzo (2002-06-06). "Rules and Strategy: One Minute Warning". ArenaFan Originals. Retrieved 2019-02-17.
  2. ^ https://www.arenafootball.com/article/new-article13022019174227

See also

Ghost in the Shell (1995 film)

Ghost in the Shell is a 1995 anime cyberpunk film based on the manga of the same name by Masamune Shirow. It was written by Kazunori Itō and directed by Mamoru Oshii, and stars the voices of Atsuko Tanaka, Akio Ōtsuka, and Iemasa Kayumi. Ghost in the Shell was a Japanese-British international co-production, produced by Kodansha, Bandai Visual and Manga Entertainment, with animation provided by Production I.G.

The plot follows Motoko Kusanagi, a public-security agent, who hunts the mysterious hacker known as the Puppet Master. The philosophical themes include self-identity in a technologically advanced world. The music, composed by Kenji Kawai, includes an ancient Japanese language.

Widely considered one of the greatest anime films of all time, critics particularly praised the film's visuals, achieved through a combination of traditional cel animation and CGI animation. The film, which had a budget over $10 million, was initially a box office failure, before drawing a cult following on home video, and eventually grossing approximately $43 million in total box office and home video sales revenue. It inspired filmmakers such as the Wachowskis, creators of the Matrix films, and James Cameron. In 2004, Oshii directed Ghost in the Shell 2: Innocence, billed as a separate work and not a true sequel. In 2008, Oshii released an updated version of the original film, Ghost in the Shell 2.0, featuring new audio and updated 3D animation. A live-action adaptation starring Scarlett Johansson was released in 2017.

List of songs recorded by U2

U2 are an Irish rock band from Dublin. The band formed in 1976 and released their debut EP Three in 1979 exclusively in Ireland. Following the release of their single "Another Day" in 1980, U2 signed a recording contract with Island Records, and released their first album, Boy, later that year. The band has since released 14 studio albums, the most recent being Songs of Experience in 2017.

Original Soundtracks 1

Original Soundtracks 1 is a studio album recorded by rock band U2 and Brian Eno under the pseudonym Passengers as a side project. It was produced by Eno and was released on 6 November 1995. The album is a collection of songs written for mostly imaginary films (the exceptions being songs for Ghost in the Shell, Miss Sarajevo, and Beyond the Clouds). Due to Eno's involvement as a full songwriting partner and the album's experimental nature, the moniker "Passengers" was chosen to distinguish it from U2's conventional albums. It was commercially unnoticed by the band's standards and received generally mixed reviews. Guest musicians on the record included Italian opera singer Luciano Pavarotti (on "Miss Sarajevo") and producer Howie B, who would co-produce U2's following album, Pop (1997).

Syria missile strikes (September 2018)

Late on 17 September 2018, missile strikes that hit multiple targets in the Syrian government-controlled western Syria were conducted by the Israeli Air Force. The Israel Defense Forces accepted responsibility for the airstrikes the following day and expressed sorrow for the Russian plane, downed by Syria's air defenses. The strikes occurred a few hours after a Russo-Turkish agreement to create a demilitarized zone around Idlib Governorate was achieved, which postponed an imminent offensive operation by Syria′s forces and its allies. Later, a Russian plane was also struck, by a Syrian government S-200 missile.

Three-minute warning

In Canadian football, the three-minute warning is given when three minutes of game time remain on the game clock in the first and second halves of a game. (If the football is in play when the clock reaches 3:00, the three-minute warning is given immediately after the ball is declared dead.) The three-minute warning stops the game clock in all cases.

Time-out (sport)

In sports, a time-out or timeout is a halt in the play. This allows the coaches of either team to communicate with the team, e.g., to determine strategy or inspire morale, as well as to stop the game clock. Time-outs are usually called by coaches or players, although for some sports, TV timeouts are called to allow media to air commercial breaks. Teams usually call timeouts at strategically important points in the match, or to avoid the team being called for a delay of game-type violation, such as the five-second rule in basketball.

Two-minute warning

In most levels of professional American football, the two-minute warning is given when two minutes of game time remain on the game clock in each half of a game, i.e. near the end of the second and fourth quarters. The suspension of play is two minutes long, the same as the short two-minute intermissions between quarters within each half. There is an additional two-minute warning in the rare event only two minutes remain in an overtime period. However, in the postseason, where games continue indefinitely if there is no score, there is no two-minute warning in the first overtime, but if the second overtime, or any subsequent even overtime, is still tied with two minutes remaining (which has never happened), there will be a two-minute warning. If the football is in play when the clock reaches 2:00, the two-minute warning is called immediately after the play concludes, when the ball is declared dead. The two-minute warning stops the game clock in all cases.

Win Ben Stein's Money

Win Ben Stein's Money is an American television game show created by Al Burton and Donnie Brainard that aired first-run episodes from July 28, 1997 to January 31, 2003 on Comedy Central, with reruns airing until May 8. The show featured three contestants who competed to answer general knowledge questions in order to win the grand prize of $5,000 from the show's host, Ben Stein. In the second half of each episode, Stein participated as a "common" contestant in order to defend his money from being taken by his competitors. The show won six Daytime Emmy awards, with Stein and Jimmy Kimmel, the show's original co-host, sharing the Outstanding Game Show Host award in 1999.

As noted in a disclaimer during the closing credits, prize money won by contestants was paid from a prize budget furnished by the producers of the show. Any money left over in that budget at the end of a season was given to Stein. If the total amount paid out during a season exceeded that budget, the production company paid the excess. In this way, Stein was never in any danger of losing money from his own pocket.

Stein's co-host was Jimmy Kimmel for the first three years. Kimmel left in 2000 and was replaced by Nancy Pimental, who co-hosted the program through 2001. Kimmel's cousin, "Cousin Sal" Iacono, who took over the role in 2002, was the show's last co-host. Although Kimmel left the program in 2000, he occasionally made guest appearances afterward, and hosted College Week episodes in 2001.

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