Ollie Spencer

Oliver "Ollie" Spencer (April 17, 1931 – April 28, 1991) was a National Football League (NFL) tackle and assistant coach. He played eight seasons in the NFL, with the Detroit Lions (1953 and 1956), the Green Bay Packers (1957 and 1958), the Detroit Lions again (1959, 1960 and 1961), and the Oakland Raiders (1963). Later. he was an assistant coach for the Raiders for seventeen seasons.

He died on April 28, 1991, of a heart attack.

Ollie Spencer
Position:Tackle
Personal information
Born:April 17, 1931
Hopewell, Kansas
Died:April 28, 1991 (aged 60)
Danville, California
Career information
College:Kansas
NFL Draft:1953 / Round: 6 / Pick: 73
Career history
Career highlights and awards

See also

External links

1951 College Football All-America Team

The 1951 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1951. The eight selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1951 season are (1) the All-American Board (AAB), (2) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA, (3) the Associated Press (AP), (4) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA), (5) the International News Service (INS), (6) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (7) the Sporting News and (8) the United Press (UP).

1953 NFL Draft

The 1953 National Football League Draft was held on January 22, 1953, at Bellevue-Stratford Hotel in Philadelphia.

1957 Green Bay Packers season

The 1957 Green Bay Packers season was their 39th season overall and their 37th season in the National Football League. After an opening win, the club posted a 3–9 record under fourth-year head coach Lisle Blackbourn and finished last in the Western Conference. It was Blackbourn's final season at Green Bay, who was replaced by Ray McLean in January 1958 for just one year, succeeded by Vince Lombardi in 1959.

The 1957 season also marked the Packers' move from City Stadium to new City Stadium, which was opened with a win over the Chicago Bears in week one on September 29. It was renamed Lambeau Field in August 1965 in memory of Packers founder, player, and long-time head coach, Curly Lambeau, who had died two months earlier.

1958 Green Bay Packers season

The 1958 Green Bay Packers season was their 40th season overall and their 38th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 1–10–1 record under first-year head coach Ray McLean for a last-place finish in the league in 1958 and the worst record ever posted by a Packers team.

In the immortal words of New York sportswriter and Green Bay native Red Smith: "they overwhelmed one opponent, under-whelmed ten, and whelmed one." The tie came in week two and the three-point win in week five; during the seven-game losing streak to end the season the Packers lost by an average margin of over 22 points and got no closer than ten. The Packers finished 1958 allowing a league-worst 382 points in the 12-game season (31.8 points per game).

McLean was the top assistant on the coaching staff in 1957 and was given a one-year contract as head coach after Lisle Blackbourn was fired in early January 1958 with a year remaining ($25,000) on a five-year contract. Following the final game of the 1958 season, McLean resigned on December 17, which paved the way for the historic hiring of Vince Lombardi in January 1959.The underachieving 1958 team was loaded with talent, with future hall of famers Bart Starr, Paul Hornung, Jim Taylor, Ray Nitschke, Jim Ringo, Forrest Gregg, and Jerry Kramer, as well as future All-Pros Ron Kramer, Max McGee, Bill Forester, and Dan Currie.

1963 Oakland Raiders season

The 1963 Oakland Raiders season was the team's fourth in Oakland. The campaign saw the team attempt to improve upon its abysmal 1962 record of 1–13.

In his first year with the organization, Raiders legend Al Davis, formerly a receivers coach with the San Diego Chargers, replaced the team's original gold and black uniforms with the current "silver and black" scheme. Under his leadership as head coach and general manager, the Raiders stunned the rest of the AFL by winning ten games. They finished with a record of 10–4, which was good for second place in the Western Division, one game behind the eventual AFL champion Chargers, whom they had defeated twice. The Raiders swept the Western division in 1963, winning all six games. For his role in the Raiders' miraculous turnaround, Al Davis was named the AFL's "Coach of the Year".

1968 Oakland Raiders season

The 1968 Oakland Raiders season was the team's ninth season in both Oakland and the American Football League. It saw the team try to improve upon its 13–1 record from 1967. They ultimately finished one game short of matching that year's result; their 12–2 finish still ensured that they would lead the league in wins for a second consecutive year. They were led by third-year coach John Rauch.

The season would feature a growing rivalry between the Raiders and the New York Jets (the latter led by superstar quarterback Joe Namath). The two teams would meet twice in 1968. The first meeting, a regular-season contest, saw the Raiders complete a stunning fourth-quarter comeback over the Jets. The contest, known today as the Heidi Game, remains one of the most famous in AFL/NFL history. The two teams would also meet in the 1968 AFL Championship Game; Namath's Jets would emerge victorious in a 27–23 upset. The Jets would ultimately upset the Baltimore Colts in Super Bowl III.

The 1968 season is also notable for a few changes to the team including the additions of George Atkinson, Art Shell, and Ken Stabler. All three players would eventually win a championship with the Raiders in 1976. Additionally, Shell in 1989, and Stabler in 2016, were both inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

1969 Oakland Raiders season

The 1969 Oakland Raiders season was the team's tenth as a franchise, and tenth in both Oakland and the American Football League. The campaign saw the team attempt to improve upon its 12–2 record from 1968. The season is notable for being the Raiders' last in the AFL (they would, along with all the other AFL teams, join the NFL in 1970).

The Raiders stormed to a 12–1–1 record in 1969. They led the league in wins for a third consecutive season; in doing so, they posted a staggering 37–4–1 record over their final three years of AFL play. The season would end with an upset loss to the eventual Super Bowl champion Kansas City Chiefs in the 1969 AFL Championship Game.

Additionally, the season marked the debut of Hall-of-Fame head coach John Madden. Madden would lead the Raiders to seven division titles, seven AFL/AFC Championship Games, and a Super Bowl championship before leaving in 1978. He would post a 112–39–7 regular season record over this span.

Don McIlhenny

Donald Brookes McIlhenny (born November 22, 1934 in Cleveland, Ohio) is a former American football halfback in the National Football League for the Detroit Lions, Green Bay Packers, Dallas Cowboys, and San Francisco 49ers. He played college football at Southern Methodist University.

Duane Benson

Dean Duane Benson (August 5, 1945 – January 26, 2019) was an American football linebacker and politician.

Kansas Jayhawks football

The Kansas Jayhawks football program is the intercollegiate football program of the University of Kansas. The program is classified in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Bowl Subdivision (FBS), and the team competes in the Big 12 Conference. The head coach is Les Miles who became the coach following the 2018 season.

The program's first season was 1890, making it one of the earlier football programs established in the United States. The team's home field is David Booth Kansas Memorial Stadium, which opened in 1921 and is the seventh-oldest college football stadium in the nation. Until 2014, Memorial Stadium was one of the few football stadiums in Division I that had a track encircling the field. KU's all-time record was 585–640–58 as of the conclusion of the 2018 season. The program saw a re-emergence under head coach Mark Mangino who won 50 games in eight seasons. After Magino's departure the program quickly declined winning only 15 games in the eight seasons after he left the program.

While Kansas has yet to have a Heisman Trophy winner, they have had one Heisman finalist and 2 other players receive votes. John Hadl, Bobby Douglass, and David Jaynes all received votes, Jaynes being the only finalist. Other notable former Kansas players include Pro Football Hall of Famers Gale Sayers, John Riggins, and Mike McCormack, as well as All-Americans Nolan Cromwell, Dana Stubblefield, Aqib Talib, and Anthony Collins. Kansas has appeared in twelve bowl games, including three trips to the Orange Bowl (1948, 1969, and 2008). Kansas played in the first NCAA-contracted nationally televised regular season college football game on September 20, 1952, against TCU.

Along with Iowa, Missouri, Nebraska, and Washington University in St. Louis, Kansas was a charter member of the Missouri Valley Intercollegiate Athletic Association in 1907, which evolved into the Big Eight Conference. The Big Eight was folded into the Big 12 in 1996, and Kansas is the only original member of the MVIAA that is still part of the Big 12.

List of American Football League players

The following is a list of men who played for the American Football League (AFL, 1960–1969).

List of Detroit Lions players

This is a list of American football players who have played for the Detroit Lions or for the Portsmouth Spartans (1930–33), in the National Football League (NFL). It includes players that have played at least five matches on the NFL regular season. The Detroit Lions franchise was founded in Portsmouth, Ohio as the Portsmouth Spartans. In 1934, the franchise moved to Detroit and changed their name to the Lions, which was a play on the name of the Detroit Tigers.

List of Kansas Jayhawks in the NFL Draft

The University of Kansas Jayhawks football team has had 175 players drafted into the National Football League (NFL) since the first draft held in 1936, through the 2018 NFL Draft. KU has seen nine players taken in the first round, including six top-10 picks: Gale Sayers, John Riggins, Ray Evans, Mike Butler, John Hadl, and David Verser. Sayers, a College and Pro Football Hall of Famer, was the highest pick from KU as the fourth overall pick in the 1965 NFL Draft.

Through the annual NFL Draft each NFL franchise gets the chance to add new players to their teams. The current draft rules were established in 2009. The team with the worst record the previous year gets to pick first, then the next-worst team picks second, and so on. Teams that were not in the playoffs receive their draft order by their regular-season record. If 2 or more non-playoff teams have the same record the tie breaker used is their strength of schedule. Playoff teams receive their draft order after all the non-playoff teams, based on their round of elimination (wild card, division, conference, and Super Bowl).In 1944 the All-America Football Conference was established and it began play in 1946 in direct competition with the NFL. From 1946 to 1949 the two leagues fiercely competed for the top college football prospects with each league holding their own drafts, before the AAFC finally merged with the NFL at the end of the 1949 season.

Like the AAFC earlier, the American Football League (AFL) operated in direct competition with the NFL and held a separate draft. This led to a massive bidding war over top prospects between the two leagues. As part of the merger agreement on June 8, 1966, the two leagues would hold a multiple round "Common Draft". Once the AFL officially merged with the NFL in 1970, the "Common Draft" simply became the NFL Draft.Sixteen former Jayhawks who were drafted have been selected to a Pro Bowl or AFL All-Star Game. Twelve former Jayhawks who were drafted have won a championship with their respective teams, one was named MVP, John Riggins in Super Bowl XVII.

Made in Chelsea

Made in Chelsea (abbreviated MIC) is a BAFTA award-winning, structured-reality television series broadcast by E4 in the United Kingdom. Made in Chelsea chronicles the lives of affluent young people in the West London and South West areas of Belgravia, Kings Road, Chelsea and Knightsbridge, as well as their travels to other locations around the world.

Made in Chelsea (series 2)

The second series of Made in Chelsea, a British structured-reality television programme, began airing on 19 September 2011 on E4. The series concluded on 21 November 2011 after 10 episodes, however an end of season party episode aired on 28 November 2011 which was hosted by Rick Edwards and featured the cast members reuniting to discuss everything from the series. Filming for the series began on 29 July 2011. This series featured the arrival of several new cast members including Alice Davidson, Chloe Green, Jamie Laing, Oliver Proudlock and Victoria Baker-Harber as well as the reintroduction of Louise Thompson, the ex-girlfriend of Spencer Matthews who briefly appeared during the first series. On 22 December 2011, the show's first Christmas special aired. The series included a rift forming between Binky and Cheska as they're forced to pick sides with Gabriella and Ollie, Spencer breaking off his brief fling with Louise to chase after Caggie again, and the breakdown of Hugo and Millie's relationship when it's announced that both have cheated on each other, leading up to Millie exposing Hugo's night with Rosie to a room full of guests.

Ollie

Ollie is a unisex given name and a nickname, often as a shortened form of Oliver, Olive, and Olivia. Variants include Olie, Oli, Oly and Olly.

The Idle Race

The Idle Race were a British rock group from Birmingham in the late 1960s and early 1970s who had a cult following but never enjoyed mass commercial success. In addition to being the springboard for Jeff Lynne, the band holds a place of significance in British Midlands' pop-rock history as a link between The Move, Electric Light Orchestra, the Steve Gibbons Band and Mike Sheridan & The Nightriders.

Tobin Rote

Tobin Cornelius Rote (January 18, 1928 – June 27, 2000) was an American football player who played quarterback for the Green Bay Packers and Detroit Lions of the National Football League (NFL), the Toronto Argonauts of the Canadian Football League (CFL), and the San Diego Chargers and Denver Broncos of the American Football League (AFL).

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