Ohio's 18th congressional district

The 18th congressional district of Ohio is an obsolete congressional district last represented by Republican Bob Gibbs. The district voted for the majority party in the House of Representatives in every election since 1954.

After the 2010 census, Ohio lost two congressional seats, and the 18th district became obsolete after the 2012 elections. The territory of the 18th district was divided and placed into several other Ohio districts. A large portion of this district, including Congressman Gibbs' home in Holmes County, became part of the new 7th district in 2013.

OH18 109
The district from 2003 to 2013

List of members representing the district

Representative Party Congress(es) Years Electoral history
District created March 4, 1833
Benjamin Jones (congressman)
Benjamin Jones
  Jacksonian 23rd
24th
March 4, 1833 –
March 3, 1837
[Data unknown/missing.]
No image
Matthias Shepler
  Democratic 25th March 4, 1837 –
March 3, 1839
[Data unknown/missing.]
David A. Starkweather
David A. Starkweather
  Democratic 26th March 4, 1839 –
March 3, 1841
[Data unknown/missing.]
No image
Ezra Dean
  Democratic 27th
28th
March 4, 1841 –
March 3, 1845
[Data unknown/missing.]
David A. Starkweather
David A. Starkweather
  Democratic 29th March 4, 1845 –
March 3, 1847
[Data unknown/missing.]
No image
Samuel Lahm
  Democratic 30th March 4, 1847 –
March 3, 1849
[Data unknown/missing.]
David Kellogg Cartter 002
David K. Cartter
  Democratic 31st
32nd
March 4, 1849 –
March 3, 1853
[Data unknown/missing.]
George Bliss (congressman)
George Bliss
  Democratic 33rd March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1855
[Data unknown/missing.]
Benjamin F. Leiter-ppmsca.26749
Benjamin F. Leiter
  Opposition 34th
35th
March 4, 1855 –
March 3, 1859
[Data unknown/missing.]
SidneyEdgerton
Sidney Edgerton
  Republican 36th
37th
March 4, 1859 –
March 3, 1863
[Data unknown/missing.]
RPSpalding2
Rufus P. Spalding
  Republican 38th
39th
40th
March 4, 1863 –
March 3, 1869
[Data unknown/missing.]
WHUpson
William H. Upson
  Republican 41st
42nd
March 4, 1869 –
March 3, 1873
[Data unknown/missing.]
James Monroe (congressman).jpeg
James Monroe
  Republican 43rd
44th
45th
March 4, 1873 –
March 3, 1879
Redistricted from the 14th district

Redistricted to the 17th district
Jonathan T. Updegraff 2
Jonathan T. Updegraff
  Republican 46th March 4, 1879 –
March 3, 1881
Redistricted to the 16th district
Addison McClure
Addison S. McClure
  Republican 47th March 4, 1881 –
March 3, 1883
[Data unknown/missing.]
Mckin
William McKinley
  Republican 48th March 4, 1883 –
May 27, 1884
Lost contested election
No image
Jonathan H. Wallace
  Democratic 48th May 27, 1884 –
March 3, 1885
Won contested election
Isaac H. Taylor 1900
Isaac H. Taylor
  Republican 49th March 4, 1885 –
March 3, 1887
[Data unknown/missing.]
Mckinley
William McKinley
  Republican 50th
51st
March 4, 1887 –
March 3, 1891
Redistricted from the 20th district
Joseph Danner Taylor
Joseph D. Taylor
  Republican 52nd March 4, 1891 –
March 3, 1893
Redistricted from the 17th district
George P. Ikirt
George P. Ikirt
  Democratic 53rd March 4, 1893 –
March 3, 1895
[Data unknown/missing.]
Robert Walker Tayler
Robert W. Tayler
  Republican 54th
55th
56th
57th
March 4, 1895 –
March 3, 1903
[Data unknown/missing.]
James Kennedy (congressman)
James Kennedy
  Republican 58th
59th
60th
61st
March 4, 1903 –
March 3, 1911
[Data unknown/missing.]
John J. Whitacre-1913-hec.03995
John J. Whitacre
  Democratic 62nd
63rd
March 4, 1911 –
March 3, 1915
[Data unknown/missing.]
David Hollingsworth
David Hollingsworth
  Republican 64th
65th
March 4, 1915 –
March 3, 1919
[Data unknown/missing.]
B. Frank Murphy-hec.19511
B. Frank Murphy
  Republican 66th
67th
68th
69th
70th
71st
72nd
March 4, 1919 –
March 3, 1933
[Data unknown/missing.]
Lawrence E. Imhoff crop
Lawrence E. Imhoff
  Democratic 73rd
74th
75th
March 4, 1933 –
January 3, 1939
[Data unknown/missing.]
Earl Ramage Lewis L000279
Earl Ramage Lewis
  Republican 76th January 3, 1939 –
January 3, 1941
[Data unknown/missing.]
Lawrence E. Imhoff crop
Lawrence E. Imhoff
  Democratic 77th January 3, 1941 –
January 3, 1943
[Data unknown/missing.]
Earl Ramage Lewis L000279
Earl R. Lewis
  Republican 78th
79th
80th
January 3, 1943 –
January 3, 1949
[Data unknown/missing.]
Wayne Hays
Wayne Hays
  Democratic 81st
82nd
83rd
84th
85th
86th
87th
88th
89th
90th
91st
92nd
93rd
94th
January 3, 1949 –
September 1, 1976
Resigned
Vacant 94th September 1, 1976 –
January 3, 1977
Douglas Applegate 97th Congress 1981
Douglas Applegate
  Democratic 95th
96th
97th
98th
99th
100th
101st
102nd
103rd
January 3, 1977 –
January 3, 1995
Retired
Bob Ney
Bob Ney
  Republican 104th
105th
106th
107th
108th
109th
January 3, 1995 –
November 3, 2006
Elected in 1994
Re-elected in 1996
Re-elected in 1998
Re-elected in 2000
Re-elected in 2002
Re-elected in 2004
Resigned
Vacant 109th November 3, 2006 –
January 3, 2007
Zack Space, official 110th Congress photo
Zack Space
  Democratic 110th
111th
January 3, 2007 –
January 3, 2011
Elected in 2006
Re-elected in 2008
Lost re-election
Bob Gibbs, Official Portrait, 112th Congress
Bob Gibbs
  Republican 112th January 3, 2011 –
January 3, 2013
Elected in 2010
Redistricted to the 7th district
District eliminated January 3, 2013

Election results

The following chart shows historic election results. Bold type indicates victor. Italic type indicates incumbent.

Year Democratic candidate Republican candidate Other candidate(s)
1832[1] Benjamin Jones : 3,037 [ none ] Samuel Quinby:[2] 2,379
1834[1] Benjamin Jones : 2,746 [ none ] Samuel Quinby (Whig) : 2,550
1836[1] Matthias Shepler : 4,384 [ none ] Samuel Quinby (Whig) : 3,325
1838[1] David A. Starkweather : 6,154 [ none ] Hiram B. Wellman (Whig) : 4,010
1840[1] Ezra Dean : 6,508 [ none ] Levi Cox (Whig) : 5,399
1842[1] Ezra Dean : 3,529 [ none ] George Wellhouse (Whig) : 1,517
John McDowell : 99
1844[1] David A. Starkweather : 6,981 [ none ] John Augustine (Whig) : 5,449
Arvine Wales : 162
1846[1] Samuel Lahm : 4,651 [ none ] David A. Starkweather (Whig) : 4,530
James Irvin : 116
1848[1] David K. Cartter : 6,682 [ none ] Samuel Hemphill (Whig) : 4,448
1850[1] David K. Cartter : 5,754 [ none ] John Brown (Whig) : 3,447
1852[1] George Bliss : 6,140 [ none ] Darius Lyman (Whig) : 5,307
Thomas Earl : 1,708
Lucius V. Bierce : 446
1854[3] Ebenezer Spalding : 5,053 Benjamin F. Leiter : 8,738 [ none ]
1856[3] Samuel Lahm : 6,794 Benjamin F. Leiter : 9,394 [ none ]
1858[3] J. L. Ranney : 7,162 Sidney Edgerton : 8,184 [ none ]
1860[3] David A. Starkweather : 6,956 Sidney Edgerton : 9,720 [ none ]
1862[3] David R. Paige, Sr. : 4,183 Rufus P. Spalding : 9,293 [ none ]
1864[3] Jeptha H. Wade : 6,661 Rufus P. Spalding : 14,472 [ none ]
1866[3] Oliver H. Payne : 7,974 Rufus P. Spalding : 14,479 [ none ]
1868[3] Franklin T. Backus : 11,980 William H. Upson : 18,359 [ none ]
1870[1][3] John M. Coffinberry : 6,695 William H. Upson : 11,053 John D. Taylor : 448
1872[1][3] Norton S. Townshend : 10,298 James Monroe : 14,662 G. W. McNeil : 67
1874[1][3] John K. McBride : 10,095 James Monroe : 12,229 H. F. Miller : 105
1876[1][3] John J. Hall : 12,772 James Monroe : 16,906 S. H. McCollister : 52
1878[1][3] Daniel T. Lawson : 12,593 Jonathan T. Updegraff : 15,320 George Smith : 2,231
David P. Lawson : 90
William M. Grimes : 37
1880[1][3] David I. Wadsworth : 13,474 Addison S. McClure : 18,570 Peter J. Rice : 310
Ferdinand Schumacher : 205
1882[1][3] Jonathan H. Wallace : 16,898 William McKinley : 16,906 Lemuel T. Foster : 976
James A. Brush : 261
1884[1][3] Jonathan H. Wallace : 16,309 Isaac H. Taylor : 22,459 Charles Jenkins : 907
Albert R. Silver : 106
W. M. Cope : 82
1886[1][3] Wallace H. Phelps : 16,217 William McKinley : 18,776 Isaiah S. Hahn : 1,853
Charles Jenkins : 1,419
1888[1][3] George P. Ikirt : 21,150 William McKinley : 25,249 Lambelis P. Logan : 1,498
George W. Thornburg : 331
Isaiah Little : 38
1890[1][3] Henry H. McFadden : 11,783 Joseph D. Taylor : 16,993 S. W. Wilkins : 1,568
1892[1][3] George P. Ikirt : 22,600 Thomas R. Morgan : 21,389 Matthew B. Shay : 1,682
John W. Northrup : 1,218
1894[1][3] Edward S. Raff : 11,051 Robert W. Tayler : 20,830 Jacob S. Coxey, Sr. (Pop) : 8,912
Enos H. Brosius : 1,679
1896[1][3] Isaac R. Sherwood : 24,770 Robert W. Tayler : 29,814 James L. Swan : 476
1898[4] Charles C. Weybrecht : 19,575 Robert Walker Tayler : 22,635 George C. Harvey (Pro) : 614
Samuel Borton (Soc Lab) : 686
L. B. Logan (Union Reform) : 212
1900[5] John H. Morris : 25,026 Robert Walker Tayler : 31,479 Alvin C. Van Dyke (Union Reform) : 138
Charles F. Bough (Proh) : 909
Henry O. Bucklin (Soc Lab) : 143
1902[1] William J. Foley : 16,472 James Kennedy : 22,461 Thomas J. Duffy : 7,923
Enos H. Brosius : 886
1904[6] W. J. Foley : 16,472 James Kennedy : 36,939 Daniel J. Smith (Pro) : 1,861
John T. Jenkins (Socialist) : 2,522
1906[1] John C. Welty : 17,840 James Kennedy : 19,684 Leslie Hawk : 1,299
John Evans : 932
1908[7] John J. Whitacre : 29,040 James Kennedy : 32,287 Robert J. Wheeler (Socialist) : 2,551
Elias Jenkins (Pro) : 2,998
1910[1] John J. Whitacre : 23,568 James Kennedy : 20,617 Thomas Williams : 4,907
Elias Jenkins : 1,462
1912[1] John J. Whitacre : 23,936 Roscoe C. McCulloch : 23,350 George F. Lelansky : 7,617
1914[1] William S. King : 22,476 David Hollingsworth : 23,650 Fred White : 2,936
V. A. Schreiber : 1,341
W. K. Weaver : 1,076
1916[1] William B. Francis : 24,538 David Hollingsworth : 26,991 Robert Carson : 2,621
1918[1] William B. Francis : 20,272 B. Frank Murphy : 22,899 [ none ]
1920 Albert O. Barnes: 32,802 B. Frank Murphy: 52,862 [ none ]
1922 Marion Huffman: 25,449 B. Frank Murphy: 41,572 Jacob S. Coxey Sr.: 5,907
1924 James M. Barton: 26,656 B. Frank Murphy: 56,206 Charles Coleman: 1,931
1926 John F. Nolan: 19,341 B. Frank Murphy: 36,599 [ none ]
1928 John J. Whitacre: 31,422 B. Frank Murphy: 71,378 Frank Sepech (W): 317
Jacob S. Coxey Sr. (S): 2
1930 Emerson Campbell: 30,815 B. Frank Murphy: 47,096 [ none ]
1932 Lawrence E. Imhoff: 56,562 B. Frank Murphy: 56,010 [ none ]
1934 Lawrence E. Imhoff: 49,160 B. Frank Murphy: 39,642 [ none ]
1936 Lawrence E. Imhoff: 83,052 Earl R. Lewis: 54,119 [ none ]
1938 Lawrence E. Imhoff: 55,809 Earl R. Lewis: 56,468 [ none ]
1940 Lawrence E. Imhoff: 79,718 Earl R. Lewis: 66,666 [ none ]
1942 Lawrence E. Imhoff: 37,951 Earl R. Lewis: 43,279 [ none ]
1944 Ross Michener: 63,098 Earl R. Lewis: 65,847 [ none ]
1946 Eugene A. Blum: 38,606 Earl R. Lewis: 55,140 [ none ]
1948 Wayne Hays: 65,475 Earl R. Lewis: 55,455 [ none ]
1950 Wayne Hays: 58,295 Robert L. Quinn: 56,508 [ none ]
1952 Wayne Hays: 78,277 Clarence L. Wetzel: 62,081 [ none ]
1954 Wayne Hays: 59,165 Walter J. Hunston: 44,143 [ none ]
1956 Wayne Hays: 78,962 Joseph Miller: 53,627 [ none ]
1958 Wayne Hays: 88,813 Francis Wallace: 35,322 [ none ]
1960 Wayne Hays: 96,474 Walter J. Hunston: 50,698 [ none ]
1962 Wayne Hays: 66,327 John J. Carrigg: 42,336 [ none ]
1964[8] Wayne Hays: 94,768 Allen J. Dalrymple: 42,960 [ none ]
1966 Wayne Hays: 73,657 William H. Weir: 41,165 [ none ]
1968 Wayne Hays: 96,711 James F. Sutherland: 63,747 [ none ]
1970 Wayne Hays: 82,071 Robert Stewart: 38,104 [ none ]
1972 Wayne Hays: 128,663 Robert Stewart: 54,572 [ none ]
1974 Wayne Hays: 90,447 Ralph H. Romig: 47,385 [ none ]
1976 Douglas Applegate*: 116,901 Ralph R. McCoy: 45,735 William Crabbe: 21,537
John Dwight Bashline: 1,661
1978 Douglas Applegate: 71,894 William J. Ress: 48,931 [ none ]
1980 Douglas Applegate: 134,835 Gary L. Hammersley: 42,354 [ none ]
1982 Douglas Applegate: 128,665 [ none ] [ none ]
1984 Douglas Applegate: 155,759 Kenneth P. Burt Jr.: 49,356 [ none ]
1986 Douglas Applegate: 126,526 [ none ] [ none ]
1988 Douglas Applegate: 151,306 William C. Abraham: 43,628 [ none ]
1990 Douglas Applegate: 120,782 John A. Hales: 41,823 [ none ]
1992 Douglas Applegate: 166,189 Bill Ress: 77,229 [ none ]
1994 Gregory L. DiDonato: 87,926 Bob Ney: 103,115 [ none ]
1996 Robert L. Burch Jr.: 108,332 Bob Ney: 117,365 Margaret Chitti (N): 8,146
1998 Robert L. Burch Jr.: 74,571 Bob Ney: 113,119 [ none ]
2000 Marc D. Guthrie: 79,232 Bob Ney: 152,325 John R. Bargar Sr. (L): 4,948
2002 [ none ] Bob Ney: 125,546 [ none ]
2004 Brian R. Thomas: 88,560 Bob Ney: 173,499 [ none ]
2006 Zack Space: 119,494 Joy Padgett: 74,475 [ none ]
2008 Zack Space: 154,396 Fred L. Dailey: 103,681 [ none ]
2010 Zack Space: 80,756 Bob Gibbs: 107,426 Lindsey Sutton: 11,244

2006 election

Padgett had won a special primary held on September 14, 2006. The rest of the Republican primary field included Holmes County Commissioner Ray Feikert; Jerry Firman of Coshocton; James Brodbelt Harris of Muskingum County; and Ralph Applegate of Columbus. When he announced his withdrawal from the race, Ney identified Padgett as his favored successor.[9] Two other Republican candidates, Dover mayor Richard Homrighausen and Ney aide John Bennett, withdrew from the race. Candidate Greg Zelenitz was rejected by the Tuscarawas County Board of Elections.[10]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af Our Campaigns - OH - District 18 - History
  2. ^ Douglass, Ben (1878). History of Wayne county, Ohio, from the days of the pioneers and the first settlers to the present time. Indianapolis: Robert Douglass. p. 347.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v results of 1854-1896 from Smith, Joseph P, ed. (1898). History of the Republican Party in Ohio. I. Chicago: the Lewis Publishing Company.
  4. ^ Ohio Secretary of State. Ohio election statistics:. page 1235 of pdf file
  5. ^ Kinney, Charles (1900). Annual Report of the Secretary of State to the Governor of the State of Ohio for the year ending November 15, 1900. State of Ohio. p. 217.
  6. ^ Ohio Secretary of State. Ohio election statistics:. page 874 of pdf file
  7. ^ Ohio Secretary of State. Ohio election statistics:. page 451 of pdf file
  8. ^ "Our Campaigns - OH District 18 - Nov 03, 1964".
  9. ^ theintelligencer.net
  10. ^ theintelligencer.net

Coordinates: 40°00′N 81°50′W / 40.000°N 81.833°W

Benjamin Jones (congressman)

Benjamin Jones (April 13, 1787 – April 24, 1861) was a U.S. Representative from Ohio.

Born in Winchester, Virginia, Jones moved with his parents to Washington, Pennsylvania.

He received a limited schooling. He learned the trade of cabinetmaking. He moved to Wooster, Ohio, in 1812 and engaged in mercantile pursuits. He was a Justice of the Peace in 1815, and commissioner for Wayne County in 1818. He served in the Ohio House of Representatives in 1821–1822, and in the Ohio Senate from 1829 to 1832. Ohio Presidential elector in 1828 for Andrew Jackson.Jones was elected as a Democrat to the Twenty-third and Twenty-fourth Congresses (March 4, 1833 – March 3, 1837). He served as chairman of the Committee on Expenditures in the Department of War in the Twenty-fourth Congress. He was not a candidate for renomination. He resumed business interests in Wooster, and died there April 24, 1861. He was interred in Oak Hill Cemetery.

Bob Ney

Robert William Ney (born July 5, 1954) is an American politician from the U.S. state of Ohio. In 2007, he was convicted on charges of corruption and sentenced to 30 months in jail. A Republican, Ney represented Ohio's 18th congressional district in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1995 until November 3, 2006, when he resigned. Ney's resignation took place after he pleaded guilty to charges of conspiracy and making false statements in relation to the Jack Abramoff Indian lobbying scandal. Before he pleaded guilty, Ney was identified in the guilty pleas of Jack Abramoff, former Tom DeLay deputy chief of staff Tony Rudy, former DeLay press secretary Michael Scanlon and former Ney chief of staff Neil Volz for receiving lavish gifts in exchange for political favors.

Ney's best-known congressional work was on the election reform efforts founded in the wake of the confused 2000 voting in Florida, and his support and backing for the "Stand Up For Steel" crusade and resulting laws. From 2001 to 2006, Ney was Chairman of the House Administration Committee. As chair of that committee, he oversaw operations in the Capitol complex and was sometimes known as the "Mayor of Capitol Hill".

Clarence Wetzel

Clarence Wetzel (February 24, 1899 – June 1972) was a member of the Ohio House of Representatives.

Hailing from Columbiana, Wetzel was a longtime politician, notably as a long term state representative. He ran for Ohio's 18th congressional district in 1952. He was defeated in 1970 by John Wargo.

David A. Starkweather

David Austin Starkweather (January 21, 1802 – July 12, 1876) was a U.S. Representative from Ohio and a U.S. diplomat.

Starkweather was born in Preston, Connecticut on January 21, 1802. He graduated from Williams College and studied law with his brother in Cooperstown, New York. He was admitted to the bar in 1825, establishing a practice in Mansfield, Ohio. He located in Canton, Ohio in 1828.He was a judge in one of the higher courts in Stark County, Ohio. He was a member of the Ohio House of Representatives from 1833 to 1835, and a member of the Ohio Senate from 1836 to 1838. He was a representative of the Democrats in Congress from Ohio from 1839 to 1841 and again from 1845 to 1847. In his first term, he was a member of the Committee on Roads and Canals, and a member of the Committee on Invalid Pensions the second term. He was chosen a Presidential elector in 1848 for Cass/Butler, and served as U.S. Envoy to Chile from 1854 to 1857. He lost election to Ohio's 18th congressional district in 1860.

Starkweather died of paralysis at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Brinsmade, in Cleveland, Ohio, July 12, 1876. He had three daughters and one son.

Douglas Applegate

Earl Douglas "Doug" Applegate, Jr. (born March 27, 1928) is a former member of the United States House of Representatives from Ohio. Applegate is a Democrat.

Earl Ramage Lewis

Earl Ramage Lewis (February 22, 1887 – February 1, 1956) was a U.S. Representative from Ohio.

Ezra Dean

Ezra Dean (April 9, 1795 – January 25, 1872) was a U.S. Representative from Ohio.

Born in Hillsdale, New York, Dean attended the common schools.

In the War of 1812 was appointed ensign in the Eleventh Regiment of United States Infantry April 17, 1814.

Commissioned lieutenant October 1, 1814, for meritorious conduct at the sortie of Fort Erie.

At the close of the war was placed in command of a revenue cutter on Lake Champlain.

He resigned to study law.

He was admitted to the bar in Plattsburg, New York, in 1823.

He settled in Wooster, Ohio in 1824 and commenced the practice of law.

Postmaster of Wooster 1828–1832.

He served as president judge of the court of common pleas 1834–1841.

Dean was elected as a Democrat to the Twenty-seventh and Twenty-eighth Congresses (March 4, 1841 – March 4, 1845).

He served as chairman of the Committee on the Militia (Twenty-eighth Congress).

He was not a candidate for renomination in 1844.

He resumed the practice of law in Wooster.

He moved to Ironton, Ohio, in 1867, and died there January 25, 1872.

He was interred in Woodland Cemetery.

Fred Dailey

Fred L. Dailey (born 1946) is a former director of the Ohio Department of Agriculture, and was the Republican nominee for U.S. Congress in Ohio's 18th congressional district. He lost the November 2008 general election by a 40.21%-59.79% margin [1] to Democratic incumbent Zack Space.

Fred Dailey was appointed director of the Ohio Department of Agriculture by Governor George Voinovich in 1991, and served in this position for 16 years, making him the longest serving Agriculture Director in Ohio history.From 1975 to 1981, Dailey served as Director of the Indiana Division of Agriculture, and from 1982 to 1991 he served as Executive Vice President of the Ohio Beef Council and Executive Secretary of the Ohio Cattlemen's Association. Dailey is a former President of the National Association of State Departments of Agriculture. In 2003 Dailey was appointed Chairman of the Federal Agricultural Mortgage Corporation.Dailey earned his B.A. degree in political science and history from Anderson University, and earned his master's degree in public administration from Ball State University, graduating Summa Cum Laude.Fred Dailey served with the 101st Airborne Division in the Vietnam War. Dailey is also a former rodeo cowboy and a mountaineer.

James Kennedy (congressman)

James Kennedy (September 3, 1853 – November 9, 1928) was a U.S. Representative from Ohio.

Born in Lowellville, Ohio, Kennedy prepared for college at Poland Union Seminary, in Ohio, and graduated from Westminster College, New Wilmington, Pennsylvania, in 1876. He studied law and was admitted to the bar in March 1879. Kennedy commenced to practice law in Youngstown, Ohio, where he also served as a member of the city council from April 1886 to November 1888. In 1894, he served as chairman of the Republican State convention at Steubenville, Ohio, in 1894.

Kennedy was elected as a Republican to the Fifty-eighth and to the three succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1903 – March 3, 1911). He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1910, to the Sixty-second Congress. He resumed the practice of his profession in Youngstown.

Kennedy became affiliated with the Democratic Party in 1916. He was an unsuccessful Democratic candidate for election in 1926, to the Seventieth Congress. He died in Youngstown on November 9, 1928, and was interred in Riverside Cemetery, Poland, Ohio.

James Monroe (congressman)

James Monroe (July 18, 1821 – July 6, 1898) was a U.S. Representative from Ohio.

Jonathan H. Wallace

Jonathan Hasson Wallace (October 31, 1824 – October 28, 1892) was a United States Congressman from Ohio.

Wallace was born in St. Clair Township, Columbiana County, Ohio. He graduated from Washington College (now Washington and Jefferson College), Washington, Pennsylvania in 1844. He studied law in the office of Benjamin Stanton, and eventually became the prosecuting attorney of Columbiana County in 1851 and 1853.

He successfully contested as a Democrat the election of William McKinley, to the Forty-eighth United States Congress and served from May 27, 1884, to March 3, 1885. He ran again in 1884 and lost.

He was appointed judge of the court of common pleas by Ohio Governor George Hoadly on March 5, 1885, to fill a vacancy and served one year; he continued the practice of law until his death in Lisbon, Ohio. He was interred in Lisbon Cemetery.

Wallace married Elizabeth L. McCook of Columbiana County in August, 1848, and had four children.

Jonathan T. Updegraff

Jonathan Taylor Updegraff (May 13, 1822 – November 30, 1882) was a U.S. Representative from Ohio.

Joseph D. Taylor

Joseph Danner Taylor (November 7, 1830 – September 19, 1899) was a U.S. Representative from Ohio.

Joy Padgett

Joy Padgett (born 1947, Coshocton, Ohio) is a former Republican member of the Ohio Senate, representing the 20th district until the end of 2008. In 2006, dogged by personal scandals, she ran unsuccessfully for Lieutenant Governor of Ohio and for Congress in Ohio's 18th congressional district. Her run for Congress was the result of the decision of Bob Ney to bow out of the race and plead guilty to corruption charges.

Lawrence E. Imhoff

Lawrence E. Imhoff (December 28, 1895 – April 18, 1988) was a soldier, lawyer, and a four-term U.S. Representative from Ohio.

Born at Round Bottom, Ohio, Imhoff moved to St. Clairsville, Ohio, in 1907. He attended the rural schools and St. Clairsville High School.

During the First World War, he enlisted as a private in the Fifth Regiment, United States Marine Corps, and served from August 9, 1917, until honorably discharged on April 1, 1919. He received the Purple Heart Medal.

After the war, Imhoff attended the Ohio State University in Columbus. He served as the clerk of courts for Belmont County, Ohio, from 1921 to 1925. He studied law and was admitted to the bar in January 1930. He served as probate judge of Belmont County 1925-1933.

Imhoff was elected as a Democrat to the Seventy-third, Seventy-fourth, and Seventy-fifth Congresses (March 4, 1933 – January 3, 1939). He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1938 to the Seventy-sixth Congress. He served as special assistant to the United States Attorney General in 1939 and 1940.

Imhoff was again elected to the Seventy-seventh Congress (January 3, 1941 – January 3, 1943).

He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1942 to the Seventy-eighth Congress.

With World War II raging, Imhoff was commissioned as a lieutenant commander in the United States Navy Reserve on January 21, 1943. He was promoted to rank of commander and released from active duty on November 8, 1945.

He was appointed on November 9, 1945, a member of the Board of Veterans' Appeals, Washington, D.C., and retired December 31, 1964.

He was a resident of North Fort Myers, Florida, until his death there on April 18, 1988.

Robert Walker Tayler

Robert Walker Tayler (November 20, 1852 – November 25, 1910) was an Ohio attorney and politician who served as a member of Congress and a United States federal judge.

Born in Youngstown, Ohio, the son of Mayor Robert Walker Tayler, Sr., Tayler attended the public schools and received an A.B. from Western Reserve College in 1872 and taught in the high school in New Lisbon (now Lisbon), Ohio. He was superintendent of schools from 1873 to 1875, and editor of the Buckeye State in New Lisbon from 1875 to 1876. Tayler read law to enter the bar in 1877. He was in private practice in East Liverpool, Ohio from 1877 to 1880. He was a Prosecuting attorney of Columbiana County, Ohio from 1880 to 1885, thereafter returning to private practice in Lisbon, Ohio until 1890, then in New York City until 1892, and again in Lisbon, Ohio until 1895.

Tayler was elected as a Republican to the Fifty-fourth and to the three succeeding Congresses, serving from March 4, 1895 to March 3, 1903 as the Representative for Ohio's 18th congressional district. He was chairman of the Committee on Elections from the Fifty-fifth through Fifty-seventh Congresses. He declined to be a candidate in 1902 for renomination, instead returning to private practice in Youngstown, Ohio from 1903 to 1905.

On January 6, 1905, Tayler was nominated by President Theodore Roosevelt to a seat on the United States District Court for the Northern District of Ohio vacated by Francis Joseph Wing. He was confirmed by the United States Senate on January 10, 1905, and received his commission the same day. Tayler moved to Cleveland, Ohio, and served on the court until his death in that city, in 1910. He was interred in Lisbon Cemetery, Lisbon, Ohio.

Samuel Lahm

Samuel Lahm (April 22, 1812 – June 16, 1876) was a lawyer, politician, and U.S. Representative from Ohio.

He was the father of Frank Samuel Lahm, a noted expatriate and pioneer balloonist, and the grandfather of Brigadier General Frank Purdy Lahm, aerial pioneer, student of the Wright brothers, and the first military officer to fly an airplane. He married Almira Brown of New Hampshire and was related by marriage to Daniel Webster. The couple had five children: Marshall, Edward, Frank Samuel, Charles Henry, and Helen Rebecca. The two eldest sons served in the 115th Ohio Volunteer Infantry during the American Civil War and died in service within three weeks of each other, by sickness. In 1855 Almira Lahm died and Lahm remarried, to Henrietta Faber of Pittsburgh. Lahm and Henrietta had three daughters.Born in Leitersburg, Maryland, he was of German descent, his parents having emigrated from Germany. Lahm completed preparatory studies and then taught school. He attended Washington College (now Washington & Jefferson College in Washington, Pennsylvania. He studied law with Oliver H. Smith in Indiana. Lahm was admitted to the Ohio bar in 1836 and moved to Canton, Ohio to open a practice. He intended to return to Leitersburg, but stopped in Canton, Ohio and was pleased with the place. He partnered with Andrew W. Loomis until Loomis left the state in 1841. He served as the master of chancery from 1837 to 1841 and prosecuting attorney of Stark County from 1837 to 1845. He served two terms as a member of the Ohio Senate in 1842. He was selected as a delegate to the Democratic National Convention in 1844 in Baltimore, Maryland.

Lahm was appointed as a brigadier general in the state's antebellum militia, and commanded the 2nd Brigade, 6th Division of Ohio during the Mexican War.

He was an unsuccessful candidate for election in 1844 to the Twenty-ninth Congress. However, he was elected as a Democrat to the Thirtieth Congress and served from March 4, 1847 – March 3, 1849. He lost election to Ohio's 18th congressional district in 1856. Lahm served as a delegate to the 1860 Democratic National ConventionRetiring from politics, he engaged in agricultural pursuits and sheep raising.

He died in Canton on June 16, 1876, and was interred in West Lawn Cemetery.

Wayne Hays

Wayne Levere Hays (May 13, 1911 – February 10, 1989) was an American politician who served as a U.S. Representative of Ohio, in the Democratic Party, from 1949 to 1976. He resigned from Congress after a much-publicized sex scandal in 1976.

Zack Space

Zachary T. Space (born January 27, 1961) is an American politician and the former U.S. Representative for Ohio's 18th congressional district, serving from 2007 until 2011. He is a member of the Democratic Party. After serving in Congress, Space became a lobbyist and was a principal for Vorys Advisors LLC, a subsidiary of the law firm Vorys, Sater, Seymour and Pease. In August 2017, he announced his campaign for Ohio State Auditor in 2018.

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