Ohio's 16th congressional district

The 16th congressional district of Ohio is represented by Representative Anthony Gonzalez (R). It also includes some rural communities east of Akron, as well as some of the western suburbs of Cleveland.

From 2003 to 2013 the district was based in Stark County and the Canton area and also included Wayne County and most of Medina and Ashland counties.

On November 2, 2010, John Boccieri lost his bid for a second term to Republican Jim Renacci, who was seated in January 2011. In January 2018, Renacci announced his candidacy for the U.S. Senate. Anthony Gonzalez was elected on November 6th to succeed him.

Ohio's 16th congressional district
Ohio US Congressional District 16 (since 2013)
Ohio's 16th congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
U.S. Representative
  Anthony Gonzalez
RRocky River
Population (2016)727,600
Median income$66,504[1]
Ethnicity
Cook PVIR+8[2]

List of members representing the district

Representative Party Congress(es) Year(s) Notes
District created March 4, 1833
Elisha Whittlesey
Elisha Whittlesey
Anti-Masonic 23rd March 4, 1833 –
March 4, 1835
Redistricted from the 13th district
Resigned
Whig 24th
25th
March 4, 1835 –
July 9, 1838
Giddings brady 1955-65rr (cropped)
Joshua Reed Giddings
25th
26th
27th
December 3, 1838 –
March 22, 1842
Resigned
Vacant 27th March 22, 1842 –
December 5, 1842
[Data unknown/missing.]
Joshua Reed Giddings - Brady-Handy
Joshua Reed Giddings
Whig 27th December 5, 1842 –
March 4, 1843
Re-elected after resignation,
Redistricted to the 20th district
No image
James Mathews
Democratic 28th March 4, 1843 –
March 4, 1845
Redistricted from the 13th district
No image
John D. Cummins
29th
30th
March 4, 1845 –
March 4, 1849
[Data unknown/missing.]
Moses Hoagland from findagrave
Moses Hoagland
31st March 4, 1849 –
March 4, 1851
[Data unknown/missing.]
No image
John Johnson
Independent Democrat 32nd March 4, 1851 –
March 4, 1853
[Data unknown/missing.]
No image
Edward Ball
Whig 33rd March 4, 1853 –
March 4, 1855
[Data unknown/missing.]
Opposition 34th March 4, 1855 –
March 4, 1857
Cydnor B. Tompkins-ppmsca.26747
Cydnor B. Tompkins
Republican 35th
36th
March 4, 1857 –
March 4, 1861
[Data unknown/missing.]
William P. Cutler
William P. Cutler
37th March 4, 1861 –
March 4, 1863
[Data unknown/missing.]
Hon. Joseph W. White, Ohio - NARA - 525458
Joseph W. White
Democratic 38th March 4, 1863 –
March 4, 1865
[Data unknown/missing.]
John Bingham - Brady-Handy
John Bingham
Republican 39th
40th
41st
42nd
March 4, 1865 –
March 4, 1873
[Data unknown/missing.]
Lorenzo Danford
Lorenzo Danford
43rd
44th
45th
March 4, 1873 –
March 4, 1879
[Data unknown/missing.]
William McKinley 1896 Baker Art Gallery (cropped)
William McKinley
46th March 4, 1879 –
March 4, 1881
Redistricted from the 17th district,
Redistricted to the 17th district
Jonathan T. Updegraff Brady Handy.04457
Jonathan T. Updegraff
47th March 4, 1881 –
November 30, 1882
Redistricted from the 18th district, Died
Joseph Danner Taylor
Joseph D. Taylor
47th January 2, 1883 –
March 4, 1883
Redistricted to the 17th district
Beriah Wilkins (cropped)
Beriah Wilkins
Democratic 48th March 4, 1883 –
March 4, 1885
Redistricted to the 15th district
George W. Geddes
George W. Geddes
49th March 4, 1885 –
March 4, 1887
Redistricted from the 14th district
Beriah Wilkins (cropped)
Beriah Wilkins
50th March 4, 1887 –
March 4, 1889
Redistricted from the 15th district
No image
James W. Owens
51st March 4, 1889 –
March 4, 1891
Redistricted to the 14th district
John G. Warwick 1892
John G. Warwick
52nd March 4, 1891 –
August 14, 1892
Died
Lewis P. Ohliger
Lewis P. Ohliger
52nd December 5, 1892 –
March 4, 1893
[Data unknown/missing.]
Albert Jackson Pearson
Albert J. Pearson
53rd March 4, 1893 –
March 4, 1895
Redistricted from the 17th district
Lorenzo Danford 1899
Lorenzo Danford
Republican 54th
55th
56th
March 4, 1895 –
June 19, 1899
Died
Joseph J. Gill
Joseph J. Gill
56th
57th
58th
December 4, 1899 –
October 31, 1903
Resigned
Capell L. Weems 1903
Capell L. Weems
58th
59th
60th
November 3, 1903 –
March 4, 1909
[Data unknown/missing.]
David Hollingsworth
David Hollingsworth
61st March 4, 1909 –
March 4, 1911
[Data unknown/missing.]
William B. Francis crop (cropped)
William B. Francis
Democratic 62nd
63rd
March 4, 1911 –
March 4, 1915
[Data unknown/missing.]
Roscoe Conkling McCulloch
Roscoe C. McCulloch
Republican 64th
65th
66th
March 4, 1915 –
March 4, 1921
[Data unknown/missing.]
Joseph H. Himes-hec.20005
Joseph H. Himes
67th March 4, 1921 –
March 4, 1923
[Data unknown/missing.]
John McSweeney (politician)-hec.12922 (cropped)
John McSweeney
Democratic 68th
69th
70th
March 4, 1923 –
March 4, 1929
[Data unknown/missing.]
Charles B. McClintock (1921)
Charles B. McClintock
Republican 71st
72nd
March 4, 1929 –
March 4, 1933
[Data unknown/missing.]
William R. Thom
William R. Thom
Democratic 73rd
74th
75th
March 4, 1933 –
January 3, 1939
[Data unknown/missing.]
James Seccombe crop (cropped)
James Seccombe
Republican 76th January 3, 1939 –
January 3, 1941
[Data unknown/missing.]
William R. Thom
William R. Thom
Democratic 77th January 3, 1941 –
January 3, 1943
[Data unknown/missing.]
Henderson H. Carson
Henderson H. Carson
Republican 78th January 3, 1943 –
January 3, 1945
[Data unknown/missing.]
William R. Thom
William R. Thom
Democratic 79th January 3, 1945 –
January 3, 1947
[Data unknown/missing.]
Henderson H. Carson
Henderson H. Carson
Republican 80th January 3, 1947 –
January 3, 1949
[Data unknown/missing.]
John McSweeney (politician) 1925 or 1926 (cropped)
John McSweeney
Democratic 81st January 3, 1949 –
January 3, 1951
[Data unknown/missing.]
Frank Bow (cropped)
Frank T. Bow
Republican 82nd
83rd
84th
85th
86th
87th
88th
89th
90th
91st
92nd
January 3, 1951 –
November 13, 1972
Died
Vacant 92nd November 13, 1972 –
January 3, 1973
[Data unknown/missing.]
Ralph Regula 99th Congress 1985
Ralph Regula
Republican 93rd
94th
95th
96th
97th
98th
99th
100th
101st
102nd
103rd
104th
105th
106th
107th
108th
109th
110th
January 3, 1973 –
January 3, 2009
Retired.
John Boccieri official portrait
John Boccieri
Democratic 111th January 3, 2009 -
January 3, 2011
Lost re-election
Jim Renacci, Official Portrait, 112th Congress
Jim Renacci
Republican 112th
113th
114th
115th
January 3, 2011 -
January 3, 2019
Retired to run for U.S. Senator
Anthony Gonzalez, official portrait, 116th Congress
Anthony Gonzalez
Republican 116th January 3, 2019 -
Present
Incumbent

Election results

2010

United States House of Representatives elections, 2010[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jim Renacci 112,902 52.1
Democratic John Boccieri (incumbent) 89,008 41.1
Libertarian Jeffery Blevins 14,342 6.6
Independent Robert Ross 128 0
Total votes 216,380
Turnout  
Republican gain from Democratic

The following chart shows historic election results. Bold type indicates victor. Italic type indicates incumbent.

Year Democratic Republican Other
2018[4] Susan Moran Palmer: 129,681 Anthony Gonzalez: 170,029  
2016[5] Keith Mundy: 119,830 James B. Renacci: 225,794  
2014[6] Pete Crossland: 75,199 James B. Renacci: 132,176  
2012[7] Betty S. Sutton: 170,604 James B. Renacci: 185,167  
2010 John Boccieri: 89,008 James B. Renacci: 112,902 Jeffery Blevins (L):14,342
Robert Ross(I): 128
2008[8] John Boccieri: 169,044 Kirk Schuring: 136,293  
2006 Thomas Shaw: 88,089 Ralph S. Regula: 124,886  
2004 Jeff Seemann: 99,210 Ralph S. Regula: 197,990  
2002 Jim Rice: 58,644 Ralph S. Regula: 129,734  
2000 William Smith: 62,709 Ralph S. Regula: 162,294 Richard L. Shetler (L): 6,166
Brad Graef (N): 3,231
1998 Peter D. Ferguson: 66,047 Ralph S. Regula: 117,426  
1996 Thomas E. Burkhart: 64,902 Ralph S. Regula: 159,314 Brad Graef (N): 7,611
1994 J. Michael Finn: 45,781 Ralph S. Regula: 137,322  
1992 Warner D. Mendenhall: 90,224 Ralph S. Regula: 158,489  
1990 Warner D. Mendenhall: 70,516 Ralph S. Regula: 101,097  
1988 Melvin J. Gravely: 43,356 Ralph S. Regula: 158,824  
1986 William J. Kennick: 36,639 Ralph S. Regula: 118,206  
1984 James Gwin: 58,048 Ralph S. Regula: 152,399  
1982 Jeffrey R. Orenstein: 57,386 Ralph S. Regula: 110,485  
1980 Larry V. Slagle: 39,219 Ralph S. Regula: 149,960  
1978 Owen S. Hand Jr.: 29,640 Ralph S. Regula: 105,152  
1976 John G. Freedom: 55,671 Ralph S. Regula: 116,374 Harold B. Festerly (A): 1,969
Mark F. Vanvoorhis (W): 77
1974 John G. Freedom: 48,754 Ralph S. Regula: 92,986  
1972 Virgil L. Musser: 75,929 Ralph S. Regula: 102,013  
1970 Virgil L. Musser: 63,187 Frank T. Bow: 81,208  
1968 Virgil L. Musser: 68,916 Frank T. Bow: 101,495  
1966 Robert D. Freeman: 55,775 Frank T. Bow: 87,597  
1964 Robert D. Freeman: 93,255 Frank T. Bow: 101,808  
1962 Ed Witmer: 64,213 Frank T. Bow: 96,512  
1960 John G. Freedom: 78,257 Frank T. Bow: 130,542  
1958 John G. Freedom: 74,660 Frank T. Bow: 100,678  
1956 John McSweeney: 82,206 Frank T. Bow: 101,324  
1954 Thomas H. Nichols: 56,787 Frank T. Bow: 79,371  
1952 John McSweeney: 82,522 Frank T. Bow: 98,447  
1950 John McSweeney: 75,255 Frank T. Bow: 77,306  
1948 John McSweeney: 79,859 Henderson H. Carson: 71,871  
1946 William R. Thom: 51,934 Henderson H. Carson: 65,639  
1944 William R. Thom: 85,755 Henderson H. Carson: 75,921 Harry T. Whiteleather: 1,149
1942 William R. Thom: 45,531 Henderson H. Carson: 50,657  
1940 William R. Thom: 92,469 James Seccombe: 71,629  
1938 William R. Thom: 60,382 James Seccombe: 62,176  
1936 William R. Thom: 89,911 H. Ross Ake: 54,979 A. M. Hickey: 4,552
Jacob S. Coxey Sr. (U): 2,384
1934 William R. Thom: 59,354 Charles B. McClintock: 45,390  
1932 William R. Thom: 67,670 Charles B. McClintock: 63,609  
1930 William R. Thom: 47,237 Charles B. McClintock: 51,113  
1928 John McSweeney: 55,778 Charles B. McClintock: 73,966 Jacob S. Coxey Sr.: 1,428
Carl Guillod (W): 92
1926 John McSweeney: 40,283 Charles B. McClintock: 27,116  
1924 John McSweeney: 51,491 Thomas C. Hunsicker: 45,559 Jacob S. Coxey Sr.: 2,901
1922 John McSweeney: 43,590 Joseph H. Himes: 39,881  
1920 John McSweeney: 42,799 Joseph H. Himes: 56,584  

Historical district boundaries

OH16 109
2003 - 2013

See also

References

  1. ^ https://www.census.gov/mycd/?st=39&cd=16
  2. ^ "Partisan Voting Index – Districts of the 115th Congress" (PDF). The Cook Political Report. April 7, 2017. Retrieved April 7, 2017.
  3. ^ "House Results Map". The New York Times.
  4. ^ "2018 Election Results". Ohio Secretary of State.
  5. ^ "2016 Election Results". Ohio Secretary of State.
  6. ^ "2014 Election Results". Ohio Secretary of State.
  7. ^ "2012 Election Results". Ohio Secretary of State.
  8. ^ "2008 Election Results". Ohio Secretary of State.

Coordinates: 40°58′56″N 81°44′26″W / 40.98222°N 81.74056°W

Albert J. Pearson

Albert Jackson Pearson (May 20, 1846 – May 15, 1905) was a soldier, attorney, judge, and two-term U.S. Representative from Ohio.

Anthony Gonzalez

Anthony E. Gonzalez (born September 18, 1984) is an American politician and former American football wide receiver. A member of the Republican Party, he has been serving as the U.S. Representative for Ohio's 16th congressional district since 2019. He played college football at Ohio State and was drafted by the Indianapolis Colts in the first round of the 2007 NFL Draft.

He was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives on November 6, 2018 and was sworn in on January 3, 2019.

Beriah Wilkins

Beriah Wilkins (July 10, 1846 – June 7, 1905) was a U.S. Representative from Ohio.

Charles B. McClintock

Charles Blaine McClintock (May 25, 1886 – February 1, 1965) was a U.S. Representative from Ohio.

Born in Paint Township, Wayne County, Ohio, near Beach City, Stark County, McClintock was educated in the public schools.

He attended Wooster (Ohio) University, and was graduated from the law school of Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, in 1912.

He was admitted to the bar the same year and commenced law practice in Canton, Ohio.

He served as assistant prosecuting attorney of Stark County 1919–1923 and prosecuting attorney 1923–1927.

McClintock was elected as a Republican to the Seventy-first and Seventy-second Congresses (March 4, 1929 – March 3, 1933).

He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1932 to the Seventy-third Congress and for election in 1934 to the Seventy-fourth Congress.

He resumed the practice of law.

McClintock was elected in 1946 as a judge of the court of appeals from the fifth appellate district of Ohio.

He was reelected in 1952 and again in 1958.

He retired in March 1963.

He died in Canton, Ohio, February 1, 1965.

He was interred in Greenlawn Cemetery, Wilmot, Ohio.

Henderson H. Carson

Henderson Haverfield Carson (October 25, 1893 – October 5, 1971) was a U.S. Representative from Ohio.

Born on a farm near Cadiz, Ohio, Carson attended the public and high schools.

Cleveland (Ohio) Law School and Baldwin-Wallace College at Berea, Ohio, LL.B., 1919.

He became affiliated with the legal department of the Pennsylvania Railroad Co. in 1915.

Enlisted in the Field Artillery in 1918.

He was transferred to Base Hospital, One Hundred and Nineteenth Unit, Camp Zachary Taylor, Kentucky, and served there until honorably discharged in 1919 as a corporal.

He was admitted to the bar in 1919 and commenced practice in Canton, Ohio, in 1922.

He served as member of the faculty of McKinley Law School 1926-1942, where he received his J.D. degree.

Carson was elected as a Republican to the Seventy-eighth Congress (January 3, 1943 – January 3, 1945).

He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1944 to the Seventy-ninth Congress.

Carson was elected to the Eightieth Congress (January 3, 1947 – January 3, 1949).

He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1948 to the Eighty-first Congress.

He resumed the practice of law in Canton, Ohio, and Washington, D.C..

Resided in Canton, Ohio, where he died October 5, 1971.

He was interred in West Lawn Cemetery.

James Mathews (American politician)

James Mathews (June 4, 1805 – March 30, 1887) was a member of the United States House of Representatives from Ohio.

Matthews was born at Liberty, Trumbull County, Ohio. After studying law he was admitted to the Ohio Bar in 1830. He then moved to Coshocton, Ohio, where he practiced law. From 1832-1837 Mathews was a member of the Ohio State senate.

In 1841 he was elected a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Ohio's 13th congressional district which then covered Knox County, Ohio, Coshocton County, Ohio, Holmes County, Ohio and Tuscarawas County, Ohio.

In 1842 Mathews was re-elected from Ohio's 16th congressional district which only differed from the old 13th in that it did not include Knox County. In 1844 Mathews did not run for re-election.

In 1855 Mathews moved to Knoxville, Marion County, Iowa. From 1857-1859 he served as prosecuting attorney for this county. He also latter served as a professor of pomology at Iowa State College (now Iowa State University) and Knoxville's postmaster.

James Seccombe

James Seccombe (February 12, 1893 – August 23, 1970) was a United States Representative from Ohio. He was born in Mineral City, Tuscarawas County, Ohio. He moved with his parents to Canton, Ohio, in 1906. He attended the public schools in Mineral City and Canton, Ohio. During the First World War, he served in the United States Army from July 17, 1917, with service overseas, until discharged April 10, 1919. He then worked in various factories as machinist and foreman from 1913 to 1932. He attended the Y.M.C.A. night school of automobile engineering in 1930 and 1931.

Seccombe was member of the Canton City Council 1928-1933 and served as vice president, president, and mayor. He was a delegate to the Republican State conventions at Canton, Ohio, in 1932, 1934, and 1936. He was elected mayor of Canton in 1935 and served until his resignation in December 1938. He was elected as a Republican to the Seventy-sixth Congress (January 3, 1939 - January 3, 1941) but was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1940 to the Seventy-seventh Congress. He served as State tax examiner, Canton, Ohio, in 1941 and 1942. He was also director of Stark County Board of Elections, 1942–1970 and the president of the Ohio Association of Election Officials in 1959. He died in Canton, Ohio, in 1970. He was buried in North Lawn Cemetery.

Jeff Seemann

Jeff Seemann is an American politician of the Democratic Party. He ran in 2004 for Ohio's 16th Congressional District against Republican incumbent Ralph Regula. The 16th District includes the city of Canton, Ohio, and overlaps portions of Stark, Wayne, Medina, and Ashland counties. Seemann received support from the Internet organizations Democracy for America and the weblog Daily Kos. In November, 2004 he was defeated 67% to 33%.

See Election Results, U.S. Representative from Ohio, 16th District

Jim Renacci

James B. Renacci (born December 3, 1958) is an American accountant, businessman, and politician who served as the U.S. Representative for Ohio's 16th congressional district from 2011 to 2019. A Republican, he is a former city council president and two-term Mayor of Wadsworth, Ohio. Renacci was the unsuccessful Republican challenger to incumbent Senator Sherrod Brown in the 2018 U.S. Senate election.

John Boccieri

John Boccieri (born October 5, 1969) is an American politician who has represented the 59th district in the Ohio House of Representatives since being appointed to fill a vacancy on September 29, 2015. He served as the U.S. Representative for Ohio's 16th congressional district from 2009 to 2011, and lost his 2010 bid for reelection to Republican Jim Renacci. He is a member of the Democratic Party, and previously served in the Ohio State Senate and the Ohio House of Representatives. Boccieri resides in Poland, Ohio.

John G. Warwick

John George Warwick (December 23, 1830 – August 14, 1892) was a U.S. Representative from Ohio.

Joseph H. Himes

Joseph Hendrix Himes (August 15, 1885 – September 9, 1960) was a U.S. Representative from Ohio.

Kirk Schuring

Kirk Schuring (born September 17, 1952) is a Republican member of the Ohio Senate. He served as Interim House Speaker for the 132nd General Assembly, following the resignation of Speaker Cliff Rosenberger. Rosenberger resigned amid revelations he was under investigation by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). He was previously a member of the Ohio House of Representatives from 1993 to 2002, and from 2011 to 2018. Schuring also previously served in the Ohio Senate from 2003 to 2010. Schuring was the Republican nominee for U.S. Congress in Ohio's 16th congressional district in 2008. In 2018 Schuring was elected back to the Ohio Senate, where he currently serves, representing the 29th district.

Lorenzo Danford

Lorenzo Danford (October 18, 1829 – June 19, 1899) was a U.S. Representative from Ohio.

Born in Washington Township, Belmont County, Ohio, Danford attended the common schools and a college at Waynesburg, Pennsylvania, for two years.

He studied law.

He was admitted to the bar at St. Clairsville, Belmont County, Ohio, in September 1854, and commenced practice there.

He served as presidential elector on the American Party ticket in 1856.

He served as prosecuting attorney of Belmont County from 1857 to 1861, when he resigned to enlist in the Fifteenth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, as a private.

Commissioned a lieutenant and later a captain, he served until honorably discharged in August 1864.

He resumed the practice of his profession in St. Clairsville.

Presidential elector for Lincoln/Johnson in 1864.Danford was elected as a Republican to the Forty-third, Forty-fourth, and Forty-fifth Congresses (March 4, 1873 – March 3, 1879).

He was not a candidate for renomination in 1878.

He resumed the practice of his profession.

Presidential elector in 1892 for Harrison/Reid.Danford was elected to the Fifty-fourth, Fifty-fifth, and Fifty-sixth Congresses and served from March 4, 1895, until his death in St. Clairsville, Ohio, June 19, 1899.

He served as chairman of the Committee on Immigration and Naturalization (Fifty-fifth Congress).

Sources state that Lorenzo Danford was interred in the Methodist Episcopal Cemetery when in fact He was interred in the Friends Cemetery in St. Clairsville, Ohio on East Newell Avenue. His wife Mary (Adams) Danford was interred next to him.

Mr. Danford was first married on October 7, 1858, to Annie H. Cook, of Jefferson County, Ohio, who died October 24, 1867. On October 27, 1870, he was married to Mary M. Adams, of St. Clairsville.

Paul Schiffer

Paul Schiffer is a native of Canton, Ohio. He is the host of the political talk show, The Schiffer Report.

Paul was a nationally syndicated conservative talk show host on the Radio America network, and more recently was broadcast on WERE (AM) 1300 AM and WHK 1220 AM in Cleveland, Ohio and WNPQ 95.9 FM in Canton, Ohio.

Paul Schiffer is also a literary agent.

Paul was a candidate for U.S. Congress in Ohio's 16th congressional district in the 2008 Republican primary.

Pete Crossland

Peter Nelson "Pete" Crossland (born May 8, 1937) is a former member of the Ohio House of Representatives. Pete Crossland served as a member of the Summit County Council for 22 years. He began his first term on the council as an at-large member in 1988. He was then elected as the District 4 representative, serving from 1993 to 2006. District 4 is composed of portions of west, north and central Akron. Prior to his service on the Summit County Council, Crossland was a member of the Ohio House of Representatives from 1973 to 1983. In 1983, he was appointed Assistant Director of the Ohio Department of Youth Services by Governor Richard Celeste. Crossland earned a B.A. from Miami University in 1959. He attained a B.D. from Yale University in 1963 and a Ph.D. from Duke University in 1966. From 1966 to 1995, Crossland was a Professor of Political Science at Kent State University. He is currently a Professor Emeritus of Political Science at Kent State University. While a member of the Ohio House of Representatives, Crossland authored 17 bills that were enacted into law and also served as chairman of the House Finance and Human Services committees. As a county councilman, Crossland championed efforts to establish fiscal stability for the county by pushing through and then removing a temporary tax. In 2001, he received an Environmental Awareness Award, presented by the Summit Soil and Water Conservation District, for his distinguished leadership on innovative riparian legislation.

In 2014, Crossland unsuccessfully challenged U.S. Representative Jim Renacci for Ohio's 16th congressional district

Ralph Regula

Ralph Straus Regula (December 3, 1924 – July 19, 2017) was an American politician from Ohio. A member of the Republican Party, he served in the Ohio House of Representatives, the Ohio State Senate and the United States House of Representatives. He represented Ohio's 16th congressional district for 18 terms from 1973 to 2009. In the 110th Congress (2007–2009), he was the second longest serving Republican member of the House of Representatives (after Bill Young of Florida).

Roscoe C. McCulloch

Roscoe Conkling McCulloch (November 27, 1880 – March 17, 1958) was a Republican politician from Ohio who served in the United States House of Representatives and U.S. Senate.

Born in Millersburg, Ohio, McCulloch attended the University of Wooster, Ohio State University and Case Western Reserve University School of Law. He commenced the practice of law in Canton, Ohio, in 1903. After serving as an assistant prosecutor in Stark County, he ran for the House in 1912. He lost, but won a second bid two years later and served three terms. In 1920, he unsuccessfully sought the Republican nomination for governor. He was appointed to the U.S. Senate on November 5, 1929, to fill the vacancy created by the death of Theodore E. Burton. He lost a special election on November 30, 1930, to Robert J. Bulkley to fill out the remainder of the term.

William R. Thom

William Richard Thom (July 7, 1885 – August 28, 1960) was a U.S. Representative from Ohio.

Born in Canton, Ohio, Thom attended the public schools.

He engaged as a newspaper reporter 1905–1909.

He attended Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio from 1909 to 1911.

He served as private secretary to Congressman John J. Whitacre 1911–1913.

He served as member of the United States House of Representatives Press Galleries in 1915 and 1916.

He was graduated from the law department of Georgetown University, Washington, D.C., in 1916.

He was admitted to the bar in 1917 and commenced practice in Canton, Ohio.

He served as member of the park commission of Canton 1920–1932.

He was an unsuccessful candidate for the Democratic nomination to Congress in 1920.

Thom was elected as a Democrat to the Seventy-third, Seventy-fourth, and Seventy-fifth Congresses (March 4, 1933 – January 3, 1939).

He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1938 to the Seventy-sixth Congress.

He resumed the practice of law.

Thom was elected to the Seventy-seventh Congress (January 3, 1941 – January 3, 1943).

He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1942 to the Seventy-eighth Congress.

Thom was elected to the Seventy-ninth Congress (January 3, 1945 – January 3, 1947).

He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1946 to the Eightieth Congress.

He resumed the practice of law.

He served as delegate to the 1956 Democratic National Convention.

He died in Canton, Ohio, August 28, 1960.

He was interred in West Lawn Cemetery.

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