Novitiate

The novitiate, also called the noviciate, is the period of training and preparation that a Christian novice (or prospective) monastic, apostolic, or member of a religious order undergoes prior to taking vows in order to discern whether he or she is called to vowed religious life. It often includes times of intense study, prayer, living in community, studying the vowed life, deepening one's relationship with God, and deepening one's self-awareness. It is a time of creating a new way of being in the world. The novitiate stage in most communities is a two-year period of formation.[1] These years are "Sabbath time" to deepen one's relationship with God, to intensify the living out of the community's mission and charism, and to foster human growth. The novitiate experience for many communities includes a concentrated program of prayer, study, reflection and limited ministerial engagement.

Novices are not admitted to vows until they have successfully completed the prescribed period of training and proving, called the novitiate. In the Middle Ages novices typically would have dormitories in separate areas within a monastery; an early Cistercian monastery, Royal Monastery of Our Lady of the Wheel, founded in 1202, has this chamber clearly visible today.

Earlier, different orders followed their own rules governing the length and conditions of the novitiate. At the time of the Reformation, the Council of Trent legislated the length and conditions by which anyone aspiring to become a monk is obliged to be a novice; the usual period is at least one year,[2] depending on the aptitude of the candidate.

The novitiate, through which life in an institute is begun, is arranged so that the novices better understand their divine vocation, and indeed one which is proper to the institute, experience the manner of living of the institute, and form their mind and heart in its spirit, and so that their intention and suitability are tested.

—Canon Law 646

Conscious of their own responsibility, the Novices are to collaborate actively with their Director in such a way that they faithfully respond to the grace of a divine vocation.

—Canon Law 652.3

Members of the institute are to take care that they cooperate for their part in the work of formation of the Novices through example of life and prayer

—Canon Law 652.3

Novices are to be led to cultivate human and Christian virtues; through prayer and self denial they are to be introduced to a fuller way of perfection; they are to be taught to contemplate the mystery of salvation and to read and meditate on the sacred scriptures; they are to be prepared to cultivate the worship of God in the sacred liturgy; they are to learn a manner of leading a life consecrated to God and humanity in Christ through the evangelical counsels; they are to be instructed regarding the character and spirit, the purpose and discipline, the history and life of the institute; and they are to be imbued with love for the Church.

—Canon Law 652

A novice is free to quit the novitiate at any time, and the Novice Director, Formation Director, or Superior is free to dismiss him or her with or without cause in most communities.

Often, in novicating, the vows are continuous through training.

In some novitiate communities, mostly monastic, the novice often wears clothing that is distinct from secular dress but is not the full habit worn by professed members of the community. The novice's day normally encompasses participation in the full canonical hours, manual labor, and classes designed to instruct novices in the religious life he is preparing to embrace. Spiritual exercises and tests of humility are common features of a novitiate. Some Roman Catholic communities encourage frequent confession and reception of Holy Communion by their novices.

A Superior will often appoint an experienced member of the community to oversee the training of novices. This may be a Finally Professed Member, novice master or mistress who is responsible for the training of all novices.

Different religious communities will have varying requirements for the duration of the novitiate. Often one must complete a postulancy before officially entering the novitiate. In many apostolic religious communities in the United States, postulancy or candidacy is one to three years. In the Eastern Orthodox Church, the novitiate is officially set at three years before one may be tonsured a monk or nun, though this requirement may be waived.

The term "novitiate" also refers to the building, house, or complex within a monastery or convent that is devoted exclusively to the needs of novices (sleeping, training, etc.).

Zusters in Sevilla
A novice is at left. The habit of a novice often differs from that of the full professed nuns or monks.

See also

References

  1. ^ Canon Law 653.1
  2. ^ "Novice". Catholic Encyclopedia.
Collège Gérald-Godin

Cégep Gérald-Godin is a French-language public college located in Sainte-Geneviève, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. It is the first and only French-language public college on the West Island of Montreal.

It is located on Gouin Boulevard overlooking the Rivière des Prairies. Its building, designed in 1932 by Lucien Parent, was formerly a novitiate of the Congregation of Holy Cross.

It is named after poet and separatist politician Gérald Godin.

Company of Mary

The Missionaries of the Company of Mary is a missionary religious congregation within the Catholic Church. The community was founded by Saint Louis de Montfort in 1705 with the recruitment of his first missionary disciple, Mathurin Rangeard. The congregation is made up of priests and brothers who serve both in the native lands and in other countries. The Montfortian Family comprises three groups: the Company of Mary, the Daughters of Wisdom and the Brothers of Saint Gabriel.

D'Youville College

D'Youville College is a private, coeducational independent college in the Prospect Hill neighborhood on the West Side of Buffalo, New York. The college is a few blocks from the international Peace Bridge and has students from around the world. D'Youville College was founded in 1908 as Roman Catholic college.

D'Youville offers 54 degree majors for undergraduate, graduate and doctoral students, as well as advanced certificates for healthcare professionals and education. There are also five-year, dual-degree programs in occupational therapy, physician assistant, dietetics, undergraduate and graduate programs in nursing, a seven-year chiropractic school program, a Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) program, and a Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) program. Education, math and natural sciences, business, and liberal arts majors are also available. D'Youville is accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools, Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education and other appropriate accrediting agencies. A number of degrees are accepted by the Canadian National Government.

Its current enrollment is approximately 3,000 students. D'Youville enrolls approximately 500 Canadian students and an almost equal split between students enrolled in undergraduate and graduate degree programs. D'Youville is consistently ranked as one of the best colleges in the nation for veterans by Military Times magazine.D'Youville is where the Oblates of Mary Immaculate (O.M.I.) Catholic religious order of priests and brothers sends its U.S. pre-novitiate seminarians for undergraduate philosophy training before they complete their yearlong novitiate and then their graduate theological studies (usually 4 years) at the San Antonio, Texas-based Oblate School of Theology.

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In 1954, the Norbertines (a Roman Catholic religious order of canons regular) opened a novitiate at the former Cassatt Estate in Daylesford. In 1963, the Norbertine community moved to neighboring Easttown Township, near the community of Paoli, and established Daylesford Abbey.

Divine Word College

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During their final semester of undergraduate studies at Divine Word College, young men who choose to continue with the SVD may apply for the Society's one-year novitiate program at the Chicago Province Headquarters in Techny, Illinois. These men may then apply to profess first vows as members of the Society near the end of the novitiate program and continue with seminary studies at the Chicago Theologate.

Don Bosco Formation Center

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James Oliver Van de Velde

James Oliver Van de Velde (April 3, 1795 – November 13, 1855) was a U.S. Catholic bishop born in Belgium. He served as the second Roman Catholic Bishop of Chicago between 1849 and 1853. He traveled to Rome in 1852 and petitioned the Pope for a transfer to a warmer climate, due to his health. In 1853, the transfer was granted; Van de Velde became bishop of the Diocese of Natchez, in Mississippi, where he served until his death two years later.

Master of novices

In the Roman Catholic Church, the master of novices or novice master is someone who is committed the training of the novices and the government of the novitiate of a religious institute.

Missionaries of La Salette

The Missionaries of Our Lady of La Salette (M.S. - Missionarium Saletiniensis) are a religious congregation of priests and brothers in the Latin Church, one of the 23 sui iuris churches which make up the Catholic Church which is led by the Bishop of Rome. They are named after the apparition of Our Lady of La Salette in France. There is also a parallel religious community of sisters called the Missionary Sisters of Our Lady of La Salette. A lay fraternal group of associates also works in cooperation with the vowed religious. The Missionaries are dedicated to making known the message of Our Lady of La Salette, a call to healing of inner brokenness and personal reconciliation with God, especially as found in the first three commandments. The missionaries are popularly known as "the La Salettes."

Missionaries of the Sacred Heart

The Missionaries of the Sacred Heart of Jesus (MSC; Latin: Missionarii Sacratissimi Cordis; French: Missionnaires du Sacré-Coeur) are a missionary congregation in the Catholic Church. It was founded in 1854 by Servant of God Jules Chevalier(1824-1907) at Issoudun, France, in the Diocese of Bourges.

Jules Chevalier, the founder of the Chevalier Family, had a vision of a new world emerging and he wanted to make known the Gospel message of God's love and care for all men and women and to evoke a response in every human heart. He especially valued love, concern, compassion, understanding, respect and acceptance of every individual. His vision was based on the words of Jesus: I give you a new commandment, love one another. Just as I have loved you, you also must love one another. By this love you have for one another, everyone will know that you are my disciples. [John 13:34 ff]

The motto of the Missionaries of the Sacred Heart is: May the Sacred Heart of Jesus be loved everywhere! The priests, deacons and brothers of the Missionaries of the Sacred Heart are known as MSCs (from the Latin, Missionarii Sacratissimi Cordis). As with most religious congregations in the Catholic Church there is significant involvement on the part of the laity, who may also serve on the missions. The international headquarters is in Rome with numerous communities throughout the world.

Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate

The Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate (OMI) is a missionary religious congregation in the Catholic Church. It was founded on January 25, 1816, by Saint Eugène de Mazenod, a French priest born in Aix-en-Provence in the south of France on August 1, 1782. The congregation was given recognition by Pope Leo XII on February 17, 1826. The congregation is composed of priests and brothers usually living in community. Their traditional salutation is Laudetur Iesus Christus ("Praised be Jesus Christ"), to which the response is Et Maria Immaculata ("And Mary Immaculate"). In 2016, there were 3,924 members.

Novitiate (film)

Novitiate is a 2017 American drama film written and directed by Maggie Betts. The film is Betts' feature directorial debut. Starring Margaret Qualley, Melissa Leo, Morgan Saylor, Dianna Agron, Julianne Nicholson, Liana Liberato, Denis O'Hare, and Maddie Hasson, the film follows a young woman (Qualley) who starts to question her faith as she trains to become a nun.

Novitiate and College of Humanities of the Legionaries of Christ

The Novitiate and College of Humanities of the Legionaries of Christ in Cheshire, Connecticut, is a formation house dedicated to forming priests for the Congregation. New members of the Legion of Christ who are assigned to the North-American Territory spend here their first fours years after joining as their first stage of training for religious life and priestly ministry, before studying philosophy and theology in Rome. The formation time in Cheshire is divided into a two-year Novitiate and two years of Humanities. After the second year of Humanities, an Associate of Arts Degree is offered. The College is accredited by the State of Connecticut. As of 2018, there are about 20 novices and 70 professed religious studying at the College.

Order of Saint Paul the First Hermit

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This name is derived from the hermit Saint Paul of Thebes (died c. 345), canonized in 491 by Pope Gelasius I. After his death, a monastery taking him as its model was founded on Mount Sinai and still exists today.

Panj Pyare

Panj Pyare (Punjabi: ਪੰਜ ਪਿਆਰੇ, Pañj Piārē, the five beloved ones), is the name collectively given to the five Sikhs men, Bhai Dhaya Singh, Bhai Dharam Singh, Bhai Himmat Singh, Bhai Mohkam Singh and Bhai Sahib Singh by Guru Gobind Singh at the historic divan Anandpur Sahib on 13 April 1699. They formed the nucleus of the Khalsa, as the first batch to receive khanda di Pahul, i.e. rites of the two-edged sword.

In Sikh theology, as in the Indian classical tradition generally, panj (ਪੰਜ), the number five in Punjabi, has a special significance. Guru Nanak in Japji Sahib refers to five khands, i.e. stages or steps in spiritual development, and calls a spiritually awakened person a panch. The ancient Indian socio-political institution panchayat meant a council of five elders. Something like an inner council of five existed even in the time of the earlier Gurus: five Sikhs accompanied Guru Arjan on his last journey to Lahore; the five were each given 100 armed Sikhs to command by his successor, Guru Hargobind. Guru Tegh Bahadur set out on his journey to Delhi to court execution attended by five Sikhs.

Until the Vaisakhi of AD 1699, Sikh initiation ceremony, Charan Pahul, comprised the administering of charanamrit or charanodak to the novitiate. As Bhai Gurdas, Varan, I.23, records, this was the practice Guru Nanak Dev introduced for the Sikhs. At the ceremony the novitiate quaffed water poured over the foot of the Guru and vowed to follow the religious and moral injunctions as well as the code of communal conduct laid down. Later, masands or local leaders, specially authorized by the Gurus, also administered charan pahul. According to Kesar Singh Chhibbar, Bansavalinama, a modification was introduced in the time of Guru Hargobind when water, poured over the toe of the right foot of each of the five chosen Sikhs assembled in a dharamsal, was received in a bowl and administered to the seekers after ardas or supplicatory prayer.

Postulant

A postulant (from Latin: postulare, to ask) was originally one who makes a request or demand; hence, a candidate. The use of the term is now generally restricted to those asking for admission into a monastery or a religious institute, both before actual admission and for the period of time preceding their admission into the novitiate. Currently, however, common usage terms the person who has not yet been accepted by the institution as an "inquirer" or "observer".

The term is most commonly used in the Catholic Church and the Anglican Communion (which includes the Episcopal Church, which uses the term to designate those who are seeking ordination to the diaconate or priesthood. Postulancy is generally considered the first formal step leading to candidacy and ordination). The Eastern Orthodox Churches uses this term less frequently.

Samanera

A sāmaṇera (Pali); Sanskrit śrāmaṇera, is a novice male monastic in a Buddhist context. A female novice is a śrāmaṇerī or śrāmaṇerikā (Sanskrit; Pāli: sāmaṇerī).

Sant'Andrea al Quirinale

The Church of Saint Andrew's at the Quirinal (Italian: Sant'Andrea al Quirinale, Latin: S. Andreae in Quirinali) is a Roman Catholic titular church in Rome, Italy, built for the Jesuit seminary on the Quirinal Hill.

The church of Sant'Andrea, an important example of Roman Baroque architecture, was designed by Gian Lorenzo Bernini with Giovanni de'Rossi. Bernini received the commission in 1658 and the church was constructed by 1661, although the interior decoration was not finished until 1670. The site previously accommodated a 16th-century church, Sant'Andrea a Montecavallo.

Commissioned by former Cardinal Camillo Francesco Maria Pamphili, with the approval of Pope Alexander VII, Sant'Andrea was the third Jesuit church constructed in Rome, after the Church of the Gesù and Sant'Ignazio. It was to serve the Jesuit novitiate, which was founded in 1566. Bernini considered the church one of his most perfect works; his son, Domenico, recalled that in his later years, Bernini spent hours sitting inside it, appreciating what he had achieved.It has served as the titular church of Brazilian Cardinal Odilo Scherer since 2007.

Society of the Divine Word

The Society of the Divine Word (Latin: Societas Verbi Divini, abbreviated SVD), popularly called Verbites or the Divine Word Missionaries, and sometimes the Steyler Missionaries, is a missionary religious congregation in the Latin Church, one of the 24 sui iuris churches which make up the Catholic Church. As of 2006 it consisted of 6,102 members composed of priests and brothers. It is the largest missionary congregation in the Catholic Church. The superior general is Paulus Budi Kleden who hails from Indonesia.

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