November 19

November 19 is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. There are 42 days remaining until the end of the year.

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Holidays and observances

References

  1. ^ Abdul-Ghafur, Saleemah (2012-04-03). Living Islam Out Loud: American Muslim Women Speak. Beacon Press. ISBN 9780807096925.
  2. ^ "See The McCaughey Septuplets All Grown Up!". Good Housekeeping. 2015-11-18. Retrieved 2018-11-19.
  3. ^ Jonathan Sumption, The Hundred Years War: Trial by Fire, (University of Pennsylvania Press, 1999), 666.

External links

Allison Janney

Allison Brooks Janney (born November 19, 1959) is an American actress. A prolific character actress, Janney has received numerous accolades, including an Academy Award, seven Primetime Emmy Awards, a BAFTA Award, a Golden Globe Award, and seven Screen Actors Guild Awards.

Born in Boston, Massachusetts, and raised in Dayton, Ohio, Janney won a scholarship to study at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in the summer of 1984, following her graduation from Kenyon College. After years of minor and uncredited film and television appearances, Janney's breakthrough came with the role of C. J. Cregg in the NBC political drama The West Wing (1999–2006), for which she received four Primetime Emmy Awards. The character was widely popular during the airing of the series and was later recognized as one of the greatest female characters on American television. In 2014, she won the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series for her role as Margaret Scully on the Showtime period drama Masters of Sex. Since 2013, she has starred as a cynical recovering addict in the CBS sitcom Mom. Her performance on the show has gained her five consecutive Primetime Emmy Award nominations and won her two Primetime Emmy Awards for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series.

Janney made her professional stage debut with the Off-Broadway production Ladies and followed with numerous bit parts in various similar productions, before making her Broadway debut in the 1996 revival of Present Laughter. She won Drama Desk Awards and received Tony Award nominations for her performances in the 1997 Broadway revival of A View from the Bridge, and the 2009 original Broadway production of the musical 9 to 5.

Her film roles include Private Parts (1997), Primary Colors (1998), 10 Things I Hate About You (1999), Drop Dead Gorgeous (1999), American Beauty (1999), The Hours (2002), Hairspray (2007), Juno (2007), The Help (2011), The Way, Way Back (2013), Tammy (2014), Spy (2015), Tallulah (2016), and The Girl on the Train (2016). In 2017, her performance as LaVona Golden in the biographical film I, Tonya garnered widespread acclaim and earned her the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress.

Booker T (wrestler)

Robert Booker Tio Huffman (born March 1, 1965), better known by his ring name Booker T, is an American professional wrestling promoter, color commentator, and professional wrestler, signed with WWE. He is also the owner and founder of the independent promotion Reality of Wrestling (ROW) in Texas City, Texas.

Booker is best known for his time in World Championship Wrestling (WCW), the World Wrestling Federation/Entertainment (WWF/E), and Total Nonstop Action Wrestling (TNA), holding 35 championships between those organizations. He is the most decorated wrestler in WCW history, having held 21 titles including a record six WCW World Television Championships (along with being the first African American titleholder), and a record eleven WCW World Tag Team Championships: ten as one half of Harlem Heat with his brother, Lash "Stevie Ray" Huffman in WCW (most reigns within that company), and one in the WWF with Test. Harlem Heat were recognized by WWE as being – along with The Steiner Brothers – WCW's greatest ever tag team. Booker was the final WCW World Heavyweight Champion and WCW United States Heavyweight Champion under the WCW banner; industry veteran John Layfield described him as "the best acquisition that WWE got when they bought WCW".Booker is a six-time world champion, having won the WCW World Heavyweight Championship five times (four times in WCW, and once in the WWF) and WWE's World Heavyweight Championship once. He is the first non-mixed race African American to become a world champion in WWE, and was voted the greatest World Heavyweight Champion in a WWE viewer poll. Booker is a 15-time world tag team champion between WCW (10 times), WWF/E (four times), and TNA (once). Additionally, he was the winner of the King of the Ring tournament in 2006, the sixteenth Triple Crown Champion, and the ninth Grand Slam Champion in WWE history. As the eleventh Triple Crown Champion in WCW history, Booker is one of five men in history to achieve both the WWE and WCW Triple Crowns. Longtime wrestler Kurt Angle said of Booker: "He's done it all... he legitimately is one of the top five best of all time."Booker was inducted into the WWE Hall of Fame on April 6, 2013, by his brother, Lash. Booker will also be inducted into the 2019 class on April 6, 2019, as a member of Harlem Heat with his brother Lash "Stevie Ray" Huffman, rendering him a two-time Hall of Famer (alongside Ric Flair and Shawn Michaels).

Calvin Klein

Calvin Richard Klein (born November 19, 1942) is an American fashion designer who launched the company that would later become Calvin Klein Inc., in 1968. In addition to clothing, he also has given his name to a range of perfumes, watches, and jewelry.

Citizenship of the United States

Citizenship of the United States is a status that entails specific rights, duties and benefits. Citizenship is understood as a "right to have rights" since it serves as a foundation of fundamental rights derived from and protected by the Constitution and laws of the United States, such as the right to freedom of expression, vote, due process, live and work in the United States, and to receive federal assistance. The implementation of citizenship requires attitudes including allegiance to the republic, participation, and an impulse to promote communities. Certain rights are so fundamental that they are guaranteed to all persons, not just citizens. These include those rights guaranteed by the first 8 Amendments that pertain to individuals. However, not all U.S. citizens, such as those living in Puerto Rico, have the right to vote in federal elections.

There are two primary sources of citizenship: birthright citizenship, in which a person is presumed to be a citizen if he or she was born within the territorial limits of the United States, or—providing certain other requirements are met—born abroad to a U.S. citizen parent, and naturalization, a process in which an eligible legal immigrant applies for citizenship and is accepted. These two pathways to citizenship are specified in the Citizenship Clause of the Constitution's 1868 Fourteenth Amendment which reads:

All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside.

National citizenship signifies membership in the country as a whole; state citizenship, in contrast, signifies a relation between a person and a particular state and has application generally limited to domestic matters. State citizenship may affect (1) tax decisions and (2) eligibility for some state-provided benefits such as higher education and (3) eligibility for state political posts such as U.S. Senator.

In Article One of the Constitution, the power to establish a "uniform rule of naturalization" is granted explicitly to Congress.

U.S. law permits multiple citizenship. A citizen of another country naturalized as a U.S. citizen may retain their previous citizenship, though they must renounce allegiance to the other country. A U.S. citizen retains U.S. citizenship when becoming the citizen of another country, should that country's laws allow it. U.S. citizenship can be renounced by Americans who also hold another citizenship via a formal procedure at a U.S. Embassy, and it can also be restored.

Dan Crenshaw

Daniel Reed Crenshaw (born March 14, 1984) is an American politician and former United States Navy SEAL officer serving as the U.S. Representative for Texas's 2nd congressional district since 2019. A member of the Republican Party, he was elected in the 2018 midterms.

DePaul University

DePaul University is a private, Roman Catholic university in Chicago, Illinois. Founded by the Vincentians in 1898, the university takes its name from the 17th-century French priest Saint Vincent de Paul. The students embody St. Vincent's values, beliefs, and influence through the question: what must be done, in terms of community outreach. In 1998, it became the largest Catholic university by enrollment in the United States. In 2018 it was still considered nation's largest Catholic university. Following in the footsteps of its founders, DePaul places special emphasis on recruiting first-generation students and others from disadvantaged backgrounds.

DePaul's two campuses are located in Lincoln Park and the Loop. The Lincoln Park Campus is home to the Colleges of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences, Science and Health, and Education. It also houses the School of Music, the Theatre School, and the John T. Richardson Library. The Loop campus houses the Colleges of Communication, Computing and Digital Media, and Law, as well as the School of Public Service and the School for New Learning. It is also home to the Kellstadt Graduate School of Business, which is part of the nationally ranked Driehaus College of Business, the tenth oldest business school in the nation. The Loop campus also houses the Loop Library, the Rinn Law Library, and the Barnes and Noble-based Student Center.

The university enrolls around 16,000 undergraduate and about 7,600 graduate/law students, making DePaul the 13th largest private university by enrollment in the United States, and the largest private university in Illinois. According to the Division of Student Affairs website, about 90% of DePaul's students commute or live off campus. The student body represents a wide array of religious, ethnic, and geographic backgrounds, including over 60 foreign countries.DePaul's intercollegiate athletic teams, known as the DePaul Blue Demons, compete in the Big East Conference. DePaul's men's basketball team has made 18 NCAA tournament appearances and appeared in two Final Fours.

Gettysburg Address

The Gettysburg Address is a speech that U.S. President Abraham Lincoln delivered during the American Civil War at the dedication of the Soldiers' National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, on the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg. It is one of the best-known speeches in American history.Although not the day's primary speech, Lincoln's carefully crafted address came to be seen as one of the greatest and most influential statements of American national purpose. In just 271 words, beginning with the now iconic phrase "Four score and seven years ago,"‍ referring to the signing of the Declaration of Independence eighty-seven years earlier‍, Lincoln described the USA as a nation "conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal," and represented the Civil War as a test that would decide whether such a nation, the Union sundered by the secession crisis, could endure. He extolled the sacrifices of those who died at Gettysburg in defense of those principles, and exhorted his listeners to resolve

that these dead shall not have died in vain — that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom — and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.Despite the speech's prominent place in the history and popular culture of the United States, its exact wording is disputed. The five known manuscripts of the Gettysburg Address in Lincoln's hand differ in a number of details, and also differ from contemporary newspaper reprints of the speech. Neither is it clear just where stood the platform from which Lincoln delivered the address. Modern scholarship locates the speakers' platform 40 yards (or more) away from the traditional site in Soldiers' National Cemetery at the Soldiers' National Monument, which means that it stood entirely within the private, adjacent Evergreen Cemetery.

Harvard University

Harvard University is a private Ivy League research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, with about 6,700 undergraduate students and about 15,250 post graduate students. Established in 1636 and named for its first benefactor, clergyman John Harvard, Harvard is the United States' oldest institution of higher learning, and its history, influence, and wealth have made it one of the world's most prestigious universities.The Harvard Corporation is its first chartered corporation. Although never formally affiliated with any denomination, the early College primarily trained Congregational and Unitarian clergy. Its curriculum and student body were gradually secularized during the 18th century, and by the 19th century, Harvard had emerged as the central cultural establishment among Boston elites. Following the American Civil War, President Charles W. Eliot's long tenure (1869–1909) transformed the college and affiliated professional schools into a modern research university; Harvard was a founding member of the Association of American Universities in 1900.A. Lawrence Lowell, who followed Eliot, further reformed the undergraduate curriculum and undertook aggressive expansion of Harvard's land holdings and physical plant. James Bryant Conant led the university through the Great Depression and World War II and began to reform the curriculum and liberalize admissions after the war. The undergraduate college became coeducational after its 1977 merger with Radcliffe College.

The university is organized into eleven separate academic units—ten faculties and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study—with campuses throughout the Boston metropolitan area: its 209-acre (85 ha) main campus is centered on Harvard Yard in Cambridge, approximately 3 miles (5 km) northwest of Boston; the business school and athletics facilities, including Harvard Stadium, are located across the Charles River in the Allston neighborhood of Boston and the medical, dental, and public health schools are in the Longwood Medical Area. Harvard's endowment is worth $39.2 billion, making it the largest of any academic institution.

Harvard is a large, highly residential research university. The nominal cost of attendance is high, but the university's large endowment allows it to offer generous financial aid packages. The Harvard Library is the world's largest academic and private library system, comprising 79 individual libraries holding over 18 million items. The University is cited as one of the world's top tertiary institutions by various organizations.Harvard's alumni include eight U.S. presidents, more than thirty foreign heads of state, 62 living billionaires, 359 Rhodes Scholars, and 242 Marshall Scholars. As of October 2018, 158 Nobel laureates, 18 Fields Medalists, and 14 Turing Award winners have been affiliated as students, faculty, or researchers. In addition, Harvard students and alumni have won 10 Academy Awards, 48 Pulitzer Prizes, and 108 Olympic medals (46 gold, 41 silver and 21 bronze).

International Women's Day

International Women's Day (IWD) is celebrated on March 8 every year. It is a focal point in the movement for women's rights.

After the Socialist Party of America organized a Women's Day on February 28, 1909, in New York, the 1910 International Socialist Woman's Conference suggested a Women's Day be held annually. After women gained suffrage in Soviet Russia in 1917, March 8 became a national holiday there. The day was then predominantly celebrated by the socialist movement and communist countries until it was adopted by the feminist movement in about 1967. The United Nations began celebrating the day in 1975.

Commemoration of International Women's Day today ranges from being a public holiday in some countries to being largely ignored elsewhere. In some places, it is a day of protest; in others, it is a day that celebrates womanhood. International Men's Day is celebrated on November 19.

Jack Dorsey

Jack Patrick Dorsey (born November 19, 1976) is an American computer programmer and Internet entrepreneur who is co-founder and CEO of Twitter, and founder and CEO of Square, a mobile payments company.

Jennifer Lopez

Jennifer Lynn Lopez (born July 24, 1969) is an American singer, actress, dancer and producer. In 1991, Lopez began appearing as a Fly Girl dancer on In Living Color, where she remained a regular until she decided to pursue an acting career in 1993. For her first leading role in the 1997 Selena biopic of the same name, Lopez received a Golden Globe nomination and became the first Latin actress to earn over US$1 million for a film. She went on to star in Anaconda (1997) and Out of Sight (1998), later establishing herself as the highest-paid Latin actress in Hollywood.Lopez ventured into the music industry with her debut studio album On the 6 (1999), which helped propel the Latin pop movement in American music. With the simultaneous release of her second studio album J.Lo and her romantic comedy The Wedding Planner in 2001, Lopez became the first woman to have a number one album and film in the same week. Her 2002 remix album, J to tha L–O! The Remixes, became the first in history to debut at number one on the U.S. Billboard 200. Later that year, she released her third studio album This Is Me... Then, and appeared in Maid in Manhattan.

After starring in Gigli (2003), a critical and commercial failure, Lopez subsequently starred in the successful romantic comedies Shall We Dance? (2004) and Monster-in-Law (2005). Her fifth studio album, Como Ama una Mujer (2007), received the highest first-week sales for a debut Spanish album in the United States. Following an unsuccessful period, she returned to prominence in 2011 with her appearance as a judge on American Idol, and released her seventh studio album Love?. In 2016, she began starring in the crime drama series Shades of Blue and commenced a residency show, Jennifer Lopez: All I Have, at Planet Hollywood Las Vegas. Since 2017, Lopez has produced and served as a judge on World of Dance.

With a cumulative film gross of US$2.9 billion and estimated global sales of 80 million records, Lopez is regarded as the most influential Latin performer in the United States. In 2012, Forbes ranked her as the most powerful celebrity in the world, as well as the 38th most powerful woman in the world. Time listed her among the 100 most influential people in the world in 2018. Her most successful singles on the US Billboard Hot 100 include: "If You Had My Love", "I'm Real", "Ain't It Funny", "Jenny from the Block", "All I Have", and "On the Floor", which is one of the best-selling singles of all time. For her contributions to the music industry, Lopez has received a landmark star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, the Billboard Icon Award and the Michael Jackson Video Vanguard Award among other honors. Her other ventures include clothing lines, fragrances, a production company, and a charitable foundation.

List of tallest buildings in New York City

New York City, the most populous city in the United States, is home to over 6,486 completed high-rise buildings of at least 35 meters, of which at least 113 are taller than 600 feet (183 m). The tallest building in New York is One World Trade Center, which rises 1,776 feet (541 m). The 104-story skyscraper also stands as the tallest building in the United States, the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere, and the sixth-tallest building in the world. The second-tallest building in the city is 432 Park Avenue, standing at 1,396 feet (426 m), and the third-tallest is the recently-topped-out 30 Hudson Yards. Not counting its antenna, the 4th-tallest is the 102-story Empire State Building in Midtown Manhattan, which was finished in 1931 and rises to 1,250 feet (381 m), increased to 1,454 feet (443 m) by its antenna. It is the sixth-tallest building in the United States and the 43rd-tallest building in the world.

The Empire State Building stood as the tallest building in the world from its completion until 1972, when the 110-story North Tower of the original World Trade Center was completed. At 1,368 feet (417 m), The World Trade Center held the title until the completion of the 108-story Willis Tower (formerly known as the Sears Tower) in Chicago in 1974. The World Trade Center towers were destroyed by terrorist attacks in 2001, and the Empire State Building regained the title of tallest building in the city. It remained the tallest until April 2012, when the construction on One World Trade Center surpassed it. The fifth-tallest building in New York is the Bank of America Tower, which rises to 1,200 feet (366 m), including its spire. If the Twin Towers were still standing today, they would be the third- and fourth-tallest buildings in the city, or second and third assuming the new buildings would not have been built. Only 432 Park Avenue is taller.

New York City skyscrapers are concentrated in Midtown and Lower Manhattan, although other neighborhoods of Manhattan and the boroughs of Brooklyn, Queens, and the Bronx also have a few high-rises. As of May 2016, the entire city had 241 buildings that rise at least 500 feet (152 m) in height, including those under construction, more than any other city in the United States.Since 2003, New York City has seen the completion of 24 buildings that rise at least 600 feet (183 m) in height, including One World Trade Center. As of 2013, 20 more were under construction. One World Trade Center is part of the redevelopment of the World Trade Center, which also includes the 1,079-foot (329 m) 3 World Trade Center, the 975-foot (297 m) 4 World Trade Center, 7 World Trade Center and one under-construction building: the 1,350-foot (411 m) 2 World Trade Center.Overall, as of April 2016, there were 494 high-rise buildings under construction or proposed for construction in New York City.

Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference

The Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference (MEAC) is a collegiate athletic conference whose full members are historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) in the Southeastern and the Mid-Atlantic United States. It participates in the National Collegiate Athletic Association's Division I, and in football, in the Football Championship Subdivision (FCS).

Currently, the MEAC has automatic qualifying bids for NCAA postseason play in baseball (since 1994), men's basketball (since 1981), women's basketball (since 1982), football (1996–2015), softball (since 1995), men and women's tennis (since 1998), and volleyball (since 1994). Bowling was officially sanctioned as a MEAC governed sport in 1999. Before that season, the MEAC was the first conference to secure NCAA sanctioning for women's bowling by adopting the club sport prior to the 1996–97 school year.

Moby

Richard Melville Hall (born September 11, 1965), better known by his stage name Moby, is an American musician, animal rights activist and author. He has sold over 20 million records worldwide, and AllMusic considers him to be "one of the most important dance music figures of the early 1990s, helping bring the music to a mainstream audience both in the UK and in America".After learning how to play guitar at the age of 9, Moby played in underground punk rock bands in the early 1980s, and gained attention in the early 1990s with his early electronic dance music. With his fifth studio album, Play (1999), he gained international success; the album sold 6,000 copies in its first week, and it re-entered the global charts in early 2000 and became an unexpected hit, producing eight singles and selling over 10 million copies worldwide. Moby followed the album in 2002 with 18, which was also successful, selling over 5 million copies worldwide and receiving mostly positive reviews.

His next major release, 2005's mostly upbeat Hotel was a stylistic departure, incorporating more rock elements than previous album, and received mixed reviews. It sold around 2 million copies worldwide. After 2008's dance-influenced Last Night (2008), he returned to the downtempo electronica of Play and 18 with 2009's mostly-ambient Wait for Me, finding higher critical acclaim and moderate sales. He followed that with 2011's Destroyed, 2013's Innocents, 2016's These Systems Are Failing, 2017's More Fast Songs About the Apocalypse and 2018's Everything Was Beautiful, and Nothing Hurt.

Moby has also authored or co-authored Gristle, Destroyed, his first memoir Porcelain, and his upcoming 2nd memoir Then It Fell Apart.

Moby has also co-written, produced, and remixed music for David Bowie, Billy Idol, Daft Punk, Mylène Farmer, Brian Eno, Pet Shop Boys, Britney Spears, New Order, Public Enemy, Yoko Ono, Guns N' Roses, Metallica, Soundgarden, Michael Jackson and others.

Pacers–Pistons brawl

The Pacers–Pistons brawl (colloquially known as the Malice at the Palace or the Basket Brawl) was an altercation that occurred in a National Basketball Association (NBA) game between the Indiana Pacers and the Detroit Pistons on November 19, 2004, at The Palace of Auburn Hills in Auburn Hills, Michigan. The Associated Press (AP) called it "the most infamous brawl in NBA history", while the media has dubbed it the "worst night in NBA history".

With 45.9 seconds left in the game, Pistons center Ben Wallace went up for a layup, but was fouled by Pacers small forward Ron Artest. Furious for what he believed was a malicious foul when the game had already been decided, Wallace pushed Artest. A fight broke out on the court between several players. While players were quarreling on the court, a fan threw a drink from the stands at Artest while he was lying on the scorer's table. Artest immediately charged after the fan, sparking a massive brawl between players and spectators that stretched from the seats down to the court and lasted several minutes.

After the game, the NBA suspended nine players for a total of 146 games, which led to $11 million in salary being lost by the players. Five players were also charged with assault, and eventually sentenced to a year of probation and community service. Five fans also faced criminal charges and were banned from attending Pistons home games for life. The fight also led the NBA to increase security between players and fans, and to limit the sale of alcohol in games.

People (magazine)

People is an American weekly magazine of celebrity and human-interest stories, published by Time Inc., a subsidiary of the Meredith Corporation. With a readership of 46.6 million adults, People has the largest audience of any American magazine. People had $997 million in advertising revenue in 2011, the highest advertising revenue of any American magazine. In 2006, it had a circulation of 3.75 million and revenue expected to top $1.5 billion. It was named "Magazine of the Year" by Advertising Age in October 2005, for excellence in editorial, circulation, and advertising. People ranked number 6 on Advertising Age's annual "A-list" and number 3 on Adweek's "Brand Blazers" list in October 2006.

The magazine runs a roughly 50/50 mix of celebrity and human-interest articles. People's editors claim to refrain from printing pure celebrity gossip, enough to lead celebrity publicists to propose exclusives to the magazine, and evidence of what one staffer calls a "publicist-friendly strategy".People's website, People.com, focuses on celebrity news and human interest stories. In February 2015, the website broke a new record: 72 million unique visitors.People is perhaps best known for its yearly special issues naming the "World's Most Beautiful", "Best & Worst Dressed", and "Sexiest Man Alive". The magazine's headquarters are in New York, and it maintains editorial bureaus in Los Angeles and in London. For economic reasons, it closed bureaus in Austin, Miami, and Chicago in 2006.

Post Malone

Austin Richard Post (born July 4, 1995), known professionally as Post Malone, is an American rapper, singer, songwriter and record producer. Post Malone has gained recognition for blending various musical genres, for his introspective songwriting, and his laconic vocal style. Born in Syracuse, New York and raised in Grapevine, Texas, Malone began his hip hop career following the release of his debut single "White Iverson" in 2015."White Iverson" peaked at number 14 on the US Billboard Hot 100 and was later certified quadruple platinum in the United States; its success resulted in his recording contract with Republic Records. Malone has since earned the number-four album Stoney (2016) and number-one album Beerbongs & Bentleys (2018) on the US Billboard 200. Beerbongs & Bentleys broke several streaming records upon release, while Stoney broke the record for most weeks on Billboard's Top R&B and Hip-Hop Albums chart after reaching its 77th week. Further, Malone has attained six top-ten singles on the Billboard Hot 100: "Congratulations", "Better Now", "Wow" and the chart-topping songs "Rockstar", "Psycho", and "Sunflower" with Swae Lee.

Romeo Miller

Percy Romeo Miller (born August 19, 1989), known professionally as Romeo Miller, is an American rapper, actor, entrepreneur, and model. Miller gained fame as a rapper in the early 2000s after signing with No Limit Records, then owned by his father, Master P. Under the stage name Lil Romeo, he released his debut single "My Baby" in 2001, which went on to be certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA). Later the same year, Miller released his debut album Lil' Romeo, which charted the US Billboard 200 at number six and went on to be certified gold, selling over 500,000 copies.

In 2002, Miller released his second album titled Game Time; it charted the US Billboard 200 at number thirty-three. In 2004, Miller released his third album Romeoland; it charted on the US Billboard 200 at number seventy. In 2006, Miller released his digital album titled Lottery it was his first album released with his name changed to Romeo. In 2006, Miller released the soundtrack to his film God's Gift; it was Miller's first album to be explicit.

In 2007, Miller was offered and accepted a scholarship to play basketball for the USC Trojans at the University of Southern California. Miller would play for the team until he was let go before his junior season in 2010.Aside from music, Miller has also worked as an actor, beginning in 2002, when Nickelodeon offered him his own show titled Romeo!; the show was successful on the network and went on to run for three seasons. In 2011, Miller starred in the film Jumping the Broom, and in 2012 he would also star in Tyler Perry's film Madea's Witness Protection.

Miller has founded the record labels Guttar Music, Take A Stand, The Next Generation and his current label No Limit Forever.

Solar eclipse of November 19, 1816

A total solar eclipse occurred on November 19, 1816. A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between Earth and the Sun, thereby totally or partly obscuring the image of the Sun for a viewer on Earth. A total solar eclipse occurs when the Moon's apparent diameter is larger than the Sun's, blocking all direct sunlight, turning day into darkness. Totality occurs in a narrow path across Earth's surface, with the partial solar eclipse visible over a surrounding region thousands of kilometres wide.

Months and days of the year
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