Notre Dame Football on NBC

Notre Dame Football on NBC is a presentation of college football games involving the Notre Dame Fighting Irish that are produced by NBC Sports, the sports division of the NBC television network in the United States. NBC has broadcast all Notre Dame home games since September 7, 1991[1], with two games so far broadcast live on NBC Sports's sports cable channel, NBCSN.

Since NBC began airing Notre Dame home football games in 1991, the network's deal with the university has ensured that all of its home games are on national broadcast television, a unique configuration amongst American sports. Most of the games are televised in the afternoon, usually starting at 3:30 p.m. ET. Since 2011, two significant home games per year were shown during prime time at 7:30 p.m. ET, and are often played at neutral venues for the purposes of recruiting and financial benefits for playing at those sites. The games were typically planned around NBC's schedule of such sporting events which are Golf Channel and Thoroughbred Racing on NBC and include full-game replays on NBCSN.

Notre Dame Football on NBC
Notre Dame Football logo 2017
Also known asNotre Dame Football on NBCSN
GenreCollege football telecasts
Presented byDan Hicks
Doug Flutie
Kathryn Tappen
Terry McAulay
Liam McHugh
Chris Simms
Theme music composerJohn Colby
Country of originUnited States
Original language(s)English
No. of seasons28
No. of episodes188 (as of November 17, 2018)
Production
Production location(s)Notre Dame Stadium
South Bend, Indiana, U.S. (Regular season)
Various NCAA stadiums
(Bowl season and Shamrock Series)
Camera setupMulti-camera
Running time210 minutes or until game ends
Production company(s)National Collegiate Athletic Association
NBC Sports
Release
Original networkNBC
NBCSN
Universo via Telemundo Deportes
(Spanish simulcasts of select games)
Picture format480i (SDTV)
1080i (HDTV)
Original releaseSeptember 7, 1991 –
present
Chronology
Related showsCollege Football on NBCSN
External links
Website

History

Notre Dame had previously had exclusive television deals with the DuMont Television Network in 1950 and ABC in 1953.

On August 25, 1991, NBC signed a five-year broadcasting contract with the University of Notre Dame, worth $38 million. Notre Dame got half of the $7.6 million that NBC paid for the rights each year of the deal and its opponent received the other half.[2]

The network's 1993 broadcast of the game between Florida State Seminoles and Notre Dame (ranked as the #1 and #2 college football teams at the time) is still the most-watched regular season college football game since NBC began carrying the Fighting Irish's games.[3]

In 2009, Notre Dame began to play one home game each year at a neutral site outside of the university's South Bend, Indiana campus for recruitment and exposure purposes, which are broadcast nationally on NBC as part of the television deal with 7:30 p.m. Eastern start times under the banner of the Shamrock Series. This was initiated with a late October 2009 game against Washington State at the Alamodome in San Antonio. A November 2010 matchup against Army at Yankee Stadium, which NBC also televised, was also a Notre Dame home game, despite West Point's proximity to the Tri-State area. Notre Dame battled Miami at Soldier Field in 2012 and met Arizona State at Cowboys Stadium in Arlington, Texas in 2013, a year later Notre Dame played Purdue at Lucas Oil Stadium and in 2015, Notre Dame played against Boston College at Fenway Park.

Ratings for NBC's Notre Dame game telecasts had slumped to historic lows during the 2011 season, coinciding with average performances of the team on the football field over the past several years; however, the resurgence in the program under Brian Kelly in 2012 has resulted in the network's highest game viewership since 2005.[3]

In 2011, sister channel Versus (now NBCSN) began airing rebroadcasts of past Notre Dame games, including those aired on NBC over the years. Previously via NBC's rights deal, sister cable network Universal HD aired same-week reruns of Notre Dame home games until NBCUniversal's January 2011 merger with Comcast. The deal has also been expanded to cover some games of the university's hockey team.

On April 9, 2013, NBC Sports renewed its broadcasting contract with Notre Dame for ten years through the 2025 season.[4] Double the length of prior contract extension deals, the agreement allows NBC Sports the rights to a minimum of seven home games to be broadcast per season, with NBC Sports Network also acquiring rights to select games beginning in 2016. While most games traditionally are held at 3:30 p.m. Eastern on Saturdays, some games will be held during primetime.[5] Revenue from the deal will continue to aid non-athlete student financial assistance.[6]

On November 21, 2015, NBCSN broadcast its first live Notre Dame game, a neutral site night game against Boston College held at Boston's Fenway Park as part of the Shamrock Series.[7]

On September 8, 2016, NBC announced that all Notre Dame home games during the 2016 season would be broadcast in 4K ultra-high-definition television exclusively on DirecTV.[8]

On September 30, 2017, NBCSN broadcast its second live Notre Dame game, against Miami (OH) held at South Bend's Notre Dame Stadium.

Personalities

Current

Former

Play-by-play

Color commentary

Sideline reporters

Studio hosts

References

  1. ^ "NBC presents the first game of its new Notre Dame football package". NBC Sports History Page.
  2. ^ Sandomir, Richard (August 25, 1991). "College Football; Notre Dame Scored a $38 Million Touchdown on Its TV Deal". The New York Times. Retrieved September 30, 2008.
  3. ^ a b Hansen, Eric (November 28, 2012). "Notre Dame football: ND-USC showdown a TV hit". South Bend Tribune. Schurz Communications. Retrieved November 29, 2012.
  4. ^ Arnold, Keith (April 9, 2013). "Notre Dame & NBC Sports renew partnership". NBC Sports. Retrieved April 19, 2013.
  5. ^ Hamilton, Brian (April 18, 2013). "Notre Dame, NBC renew deal through 2025". Chicago Tribune. Tribune Publishing. Retrieved April 19, 2013.
  6. ^ "NBC's Notre Dame deal extended". ESPN. Associated Press. April 18, 2013. Retrieved April 19, 2013.
  7. ^ "NBCSN to air ND vs. BC Shamrock Series Game Saturday". University of Notre Dame. CBS Interactive. November 20, 2015. Retrieved September 12, 2016.
  8. ^ Umstead, R. Thomas (September 8, 2016). "DirecTV To Offer Notre Dame Football Telecasts In 4K". Multichannel News. Retrieved September 12, 2016.
  9. ^ "Notre Dame & NBC Sports Group renew historic football partnership". NBC Sports. April 18, 2013. Retrieved April 19, 2013.
  10. ^ Lepore, Steve (July 10, 2014). "NBC Hires Kathryn Tappen as Notre Dame Sideline Reporter, NHL Host". Awful Announcing. Retrieved September 22, 2014.
  11. ^ a b "Great Games". Tripod.com. Retrieved January 24, 2010.
  12. ^ 1995 Notre Dame vs. USC - Kinnon Tatum on YouTube
  13. ^ "Jim Gray biography" (PDF). HarryWalker.com. Retrieved January 24, 2010.

External links

2019 Oakland Raiders season

The 2019 Oakland Raiders season is the 60th overall season of the Oakland Raiders' franchise, the franchise's 50th season in the National Football League and their second under head coach Jon Gruden since his rehiring by the organization (sixth overall).

After initially stating they would not return to RingCentral Coliseum for 2019, the Raiders were effectively forced to return to the stadium after their regional rivals, the San Francisco 49ers, blocked an effort to play at Oracle Park while they await the completion of Allegiant Stadium in Paradise, Nevada. Assuming Allegiant Stadium is in a usable state by 2020, this will be the 25th and final season in the team's second tenure in Oakland. The Raiders will be looking to improve from their 4–12 record the previous season. It was announced on June 11, 2019 that the Raiders would be featured on HBO's Hard Knocks, premiering on August 6, 2019.Prior to the season, the Raiders hired former NFL Network draft guru and former Notre Dame Football on NBC color commentator Mike Mayock as general manager.

Chris Simms

Christopher David Simms (born August 29, 1980) is a former American football quarterback who played in the National Football League (NFL). He was drafted by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in the third round of the 2003 NFL Draft. He played college football at Texas.

Simms also played for the Denver Broncos and the Tennessee Titans. He is the son of former New York Giants quarterback and Super Bowl XXI MVP Phil Simms and the older brother of Atlanta Falcons quarterback Matt Simms.

College Football on NBCSN

College Football on NBCSN is the branding used for broadcasts of NCAA Division I and Division I-A college football games produced by NBC Sports and televised on CNBC and NBCSN in the United States. The network has broadcast college football games from various athletic conferences since 2006.

College football on television

College football on television includes the broad- and cablecasting of college football games, as well as pre- and post-game reports, analysis, and human-interest stories. Within the United States, the college version of American football annually garners high television ratings.

College football games have been broadcast since 1939, beginning with the 1939 Waynesburg vs. Fordham football game on September 30 in New York City. College football telecasts were historically very restricted due to there being only three major television networks and also because the NCAA controlled all television rights and limited the number of games that aired to protect attendance. A 1984 ruling declaring the NCAA's television restrictions illegal, along with the introduction of sports-specific television networks has increased the amount of air-time available for coverage. Today, dozens of games are available for viewing each week of the football season. Other coverage includes local broadcasts of weekly coach's programs. These programs have become an important sources of revenue for the universities and their athletics programs.

Coverage is dependent on negotiations between the broadcaster and the college football conference or team. The televised games may change from year-to-year depending on which teams are having a strong season, although some traditional rivalry games are broadcast each year. Some games are traditionally associated with a specific event or holiday, and viewing the game itself can become a holiday tradition for fans. Post-season bowl games, including the College Football Playoff, are presently all televised, most of them by the ESPN networks.Universities found to have seriously violated NCAA rules have occasionally been penalized with a "television ban"; the effect can equal that of the "death penalty". The sanction is rarely applied except for the most egregious of circumstances, such as the Southern Methodist University football scandal.

Craig Minervini

Craig Minervini is an American sportscaster based in Miami, Florida. He is host of Marlins Live and former host of Panthers Live.He and former wife Martha Sulgalski had two sons (Chase and Maxwell) and one daughter (Spencer). Martha Sugalski has been a journalist and news anchor since the late 1980s.

Dick Enberg

Richard Alan Enberg (January 9, 1935 – December 21, 2017) was an American sportscaster. Over the course of an approximately 60-year career, he provided play-by-play of various sports for several radio and television networks, including NBC (1975–1999), CBS (2000–2014), and ESPN (2004–2011), as well for individual teams, such as UCLA Bruins basketball, Los Angeles Rams football, and California Angels and San Diego Padres baseball.

Enberg was well known for his signature on-air catchphrases "Touch 'em all" (for home runs) and "Oh, my!" (for particularly exciting and outstanding athletic plays). He also announced or hosted the Tournament of Roses Parade for many years, sometimes with the help of family members. Enberg retired from broadcasting in 2016, after seven seasons as the Padres' primary television announcer.

Doug Flutie

Douglas Richard Flutie (born October 23, 1962) is an American former quarterback in the National Football League (NFL), Canadian Football League (CFL), and United States Football League (USFL).

Flutie first rose to prominence during his college football career at Boston College, where he received the Heisman Trophy and the Davey O'Brien National Quarterback Award in 1984. His "Hail Flutie" touchdown pass in a game against Miami on November 23, 1984 (dubbed "The Pass") is considered among the greatest moments in college football and American sports history.Flutie was selected as the 285th pick in the 11th round of the 1985 NFL Draft by the Los Angeles Rams, making him the lowest drafted Heisman Award winner among those who were drafted. Flutie played that year for the New Jersey Generals of the upstart USFL, having already signed a five-year $7 million contract with them prior to being drafted by the Rams. In 1986, he signed with the NFL's Chicago Bears, and later played for the New England Patriots, becoming their starting quarterback in 1988.

Flutie signed with the BC Lions of the CFL in 1990, and in 1991, threw for a record 6,619 yards. He played briefly with his brother Darren, a wide receiver, before being traded to the Calgary Stampeders, whom he led to victory in the 1992 Grey Cup. In 1994, he threw a record 48 touchdown passes. Flutie played for the Stampeders until 1996, when he signed with the Toronto Argonauts, leading them to back-to-back Grey Cup victories in 1996 and 1997. Flutie was named the CFL's Most Outstanding Player a record six times, and was named the MVP in all three of his Grey Cup victories. Flutie is widely considered to be one of the greatest CFL players of all-time.He returned to the NFL in 1998 with the Buffalo Bills, where he earned Pro Bowl and NFL Comeback Player of the Year honors. He played for the San Diego Chargers from 2001 to 2004, and finished his career as a member of the New England Patriots in 2005. In 2006, he was ranked No. 1 in a list of the top 50 CFL players. He was named to the College Football Hall of Fame and Canada's Sports Hall of Fame in 2007.

After retiring in 2006, Flutie served as a college football analyst for ESPN and ABC. In 2009, he joined Versus as a broadcaster for United Football League games. Since 2011, he has worked for NBC Sports and NBCSN and in 2014 became the color commentator for Notre Dame Football on NBC.

John Dockery

John Dockery (September 6, 1944) is an American sportscaster and former American football defensive back who played for the New York Jets and later the Pittsburgh Steelers from 1968 to 1973. He was signed as an undrafted free agent by the Jets out of Harvard. He spent the last two years of his playing career with the Steelers.Following his retirement, Dockery went on to co-host Sports Extra on WNYW Channel 5 in New York City with Bill Mazer. He also served as a color analyst for College Football on ABC and NFL on CBS telecasts as well as a sideline reporter for College Football on CBS and Notre Dame Football on NBC.

Dockery served as a sideline reporter for Monday Night Football broadcasts on Westwood One radio from 1999 to 2007. Prior to that, he served as analyst for the network's Sunday Night Football radiocasts, as well as sideline reporter for other games.

Dockery continues to serve the game of football by co-organizing a youth football camp with Joe Namath that is in this 44th year. Additionally after his sports career Dockery founded Cambridge Corporate Services in 1998, a New York-based outsourcing service provider.

Lewis Johnson

Lewis Johnson is an American sports commentator and sports reporter. He is one of the few sports broadcasters to have worked for ABC, NBC and CBS. He has also worked for Westwood One, ESPN, the Pac-12 Network and Turner Sports.

Lewis is a graduate of the University of Cincinnati. The 6 ft 6 in (1.98 m) Lewis placed 8th in the 800 meters at the 1987 NCAA Championships with his personal record of 1:47.00.

List of American television programs currently in production

This is a list of American television programs currently in production.

List of NFL on NBC commentator pairings

The first name that's slated is the play-by-play man while the color commentator or commentators are slated second and sideline reporters, if used, are slated last.

List of Pittsburgh Steelers figures in broadcasting

The Steelers franchise has a rich history of producing well-known sportscasters over the years: the most famous of whom was Myron Cope, who served as a Steelers radio color commentator for 35 seasons (1970-2004).

Additionally, several former players for the Pittsburgh Steelers picked up the broadcast microphone:

Lynn Swann (wide receiver, 1974-1982) - starting in 1978 was a sideline reporter for ABC Sports. Over the 2005 and 2006 NFL seasons, he had taken a leave of absence to unsuccessfully pursue the governor's office of Pennsylvania. Swann has also had several Hollywood roles, making cameos in 1998's The Waterboy, 1993's The Program and 1991's The Last Boy Scout. His TV cameos include Saturday Night Live and The Drew Carey Show.

Merril Hoge (running back, 1987-1993) - has hosted sports shows on ESPN and ESPN2 since 1996 most notably NFL Matchup, Football Friday and NFL 2Night/ NFLLive. He has also had hosting duties on ABC/ESPN's Great Outdoor Games. He also served as an analyst for the Steelers radio network alongside Bill Hillgrove and the late Myron Cope.

Mark Malone (quarterback, 1980-1987) - began his career as a sports reporter for Pittsburgh's WPXI-TV from 1991–1994, from 1994 to 2004 he hosted nationally-televised sports shows for ESPN, including NFL 2Night, NFL Matchup and the X-Games. From 2004-2008 he was director of sports broadcasting at CBS2 Chicago. Now Hosts his own program weeknights from 7 PM - 10 PM on NBC Sports Radio.

Jerome Bettis (running back, 1998-2011) - formerly an analyst for NBC Sunday Night Football's Football Night in America pregame with Bob Costas 2006–2009, also is host of the Pittsburgh broadcast The Jerome Bettis Show 1998–2007 on KDKA-TV and 2007-Present on WPXI-TV.

Hines Ward (wide receiver, 1996-2005) - former analyst for NBC Sunday Night Football's Football Night in America. Pregame/halftime analyst for Notre Dame Football on NBC (2013–2015), Now is a Sports Analyst for CNN since 2016 and hosts The Hines Ward Show 2013–Present on WPXI-TV.

Bill Cowher (head coach, 1992-2006) - co-host of CBS Sports NFL Today on CBS as a studio analyst, joining Dan Marino, Shannon Sharpe, and Boomer Esiason. Cowher had a cameo in 1998's The Waterboy, and in 2007 Cowher appeared in the ABC reality television series Fast Cars and Superstars: The Gillette Young Guns Celebrity Race, featuring a dozen celebrities in a stock car racing competition. Cowher matched up against Gabrielle Reece and William Shatner. Cowher has also made a cameo in The Dark Knight Rises with several other Steelers players, as the coach of the Gotham Rogues.

Terry Bradshaw (quarterback, 1970-1983) - started as a guest commentator for CBS NFL playoff broadcasts from 1980–1982, after retirement he joined Verne Lundquist at CBS full-time as a game analyst on what became one of the top rated sports broadcasts. In 1990, he went from the broadcast booth to the pregame studio shows anchoring the NFL Today pregame shows on CBS and later on Fox NFL Sunday. In recent years he has started to host regular features in addition to the show, "Ten yards with TB" and the "Terry Awards". In addition to broadcasting Bradshaw has had appearances in several major motion pictures (most notably Smokey and the Bandit II, Black Sunday, and Failure to Launch) as well as spokesman for Radio Shack and SaniKing among others in commercials. He also has made many guest appearances on sitcoms from Married... with Children to Evening Shade and Wee Willie Winkie.

Kordell Stewart (quarterback 1998-2003) - currently an ESPN analyst for all NFL shows and an Analyst for TuneIn's NFL Coverage.

Tunch Ilkin (offensive tackle, 1980–1992) - current Steelers radio color commentator; Pittsburgh CW Network In the Locker Room Host 2006–Present.

Craig Wolfley (offensive lineman, 1980-1989) - current Steelers radio sideline reporter; Pittsburgh CW Network In the Locker Room Host 2006–Present.

Rod Woodson (defensive back, 1987–1996), (1997 with 49ers), (1998-2001 with Ravens), and (2002-2003 with Raiders) - current analyst for NFL Network 2003–Present.

Jack Ham (linebacker, 1971–1982) - did color commentary for the Steelers on KDKA-TV during the NFL Preseason into the early 2000s before leaving and being replaced by former teammate Edmund Nelson. Ham also co-hosted some pregame and postgame shows on the station, but was replaced by Nelson in those roles as well. Since 2000, Ham has been the color analyst on the Penn State football radio network.

Edmund Nelson (defensive lineman, 1982-1988) - served as the color analyst for Pittsburgh Steelers pre-season games and participated as a co-host to Bob Pompeani in KDKA-TV's regular season pregame program Steelers Kickoff until retiring in 2015.

Charlie Batch (quarterback, 2002-2012) - took a Steelers pregame studio analyst job with KDKA-TV for the 2013 season alongside KDKA-TV sports anchor Bob Pompeani and ex-Steeler defensive lineman Edmund Nelson, effectively ending his NFL career. He continued in this role for the 2014 season. In 2015, Batch replaced the retiring Nelson as KDKA-TV's color commentator for preseason games, while becoming the main studio analyst for the Steelers pregame coverage prior to the national airing of The NFL Today. Former teammate Chris Hoke replaced Nelson for the post-game show.

Tony Dungy (defensive back, 1977-1979) - as an analyst on NBC's Football Night in America.

List of programs broadcast by NBC

This is a list of original programming currently broadcast by the American television network NBC.

NBCSN

NBCSN is an American pay television channel that is owned by the NBC Sports Group division of NBCUniversal. It originally launched on July 1, 1995, as the Outdoor Life Network (OLN), which was dedicated to programming primarily involving fishing, hunting, outdoor adventure programs, and outdoor sports. By the turn of the 21st century, OLN became better known for its extensive coverage of the Tour de France but eventually began covering more "mainstream" sporting events, resulting in its relaunch as Versus in September 2006.

In 2011, Comcast, the original owner of the network, acquired a majority stake in NBC Universal. As a result, Comcast merged the operations of its pay channels with those of NBC. In particular, it aligned the operation of its sports channels with NBC's sports division, NBC Sports. On January 2, 2012, Versus was rebranded as the NBC Sports Network (on-air branding later shortened to NBCSN) to reflect these changes. As of September 15, 2014, the majority of NBC Sports' operations, including NBCSN, is based in facilities in Stamford, Connecticut.

As of February 2015, NBCSN is available to approximately 81,578,000 pay television households (70.1% of households with television) in the United States.

NBC College Football Game of the Week

The NBC College Football Game of the Week refers to nationally televised broadcasts of Saturday afternoon college football games that were produced by NBC Sports, the sports division of the NBC television network in the United States. Bowl games were always exempt from the NCAA's television regulations, and the games' organizers were free to sign rights deals with any network. In NBC's case, the 1952 Rose Bowl at the end of that particular season was the first national telecast of a college bowl game.

NBC Sports

NBC Sports is the programming division of the American broadcast network NBC, owned by the NBCUniversal Television Group division of NBCUniversal, that is responsible for sports broadcasts on the network, and its dedicated national sports cable channels. Formerly operating as "a service of NBC News", it broadcasts a diverse array of sports events, including the Olympic Games, the NFL, NASCAR, the NHL, Notre Dame football, the PGA Tour, the IndyCar Series, the French Open, the Premier League, and the Triple Crown, among others. Other programming from outside producers – such as coverage of the Ironman Triathlon – is also presented on the network through NBC Sports. With Comcast's acquisition of NBCUniversal, its own cable sports networks were aligned with NBC Sports into a part of the division known as the NBC Sports Group.

Tom Hammond

Thomas Taylor Hammond (born May 10, 1944) is an American sportscaster for NBC Sports. For many years, Hammond was one of the network's staple on-air presenters, along with Bob Costas and Dan Hicks.

Hammond is best known for his coverage of Thoroughbred Racing on NBC, coverage of Notre Dame Football on NBC from 1992 until 2012 and his coverage of the NFL on NBC from 1985 until 2011.

Hammond also served as the play-by-play announcer for NBC's coverage of track and field at each Summer Olympics from 1992 to 2016. He also announced the speed skating events during the 2018 Winter Olympics.

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