North Riding of Yorkshire

The North Riding of Yorkshire is one of the three historic subdivisions (ridings) of the English county of Yorkshire, alongside the East and West ridings. From the Restoration it was used as a lieutenancy area, having been part of the Yorkshire lieutenancy previously. The three ridings were treated as three counties for many purposes, such as having separate quarter sessions. An administrative county was created with a county council in 1889 under the Local Government Act 1888 on the historic boundaries. In 1974 both the administrative county and the Lieutenancy of the North Riding of Yorkshire were abolished, being succeeded in most of the riding by the new non-metropolitan county of North Yorkshire.

The highest point in the North Riding is Mickle Fell at 2,585 ft (788 metres).

County of York, North Riding
Official flag of the North Riding of Yorkshire

Flag of North Riding (2013)
North Riding locator in England

North Riding shown within England
Area
 • 19111,359,600 acres (5,502 km2)
 • 19611,376,607 acres (5,570.93 km2)
Population
 • 1901286,036
 • 1971329,410
History
 • Created1889
 • Abolished1974
 • Succeeded byNorth Yorkshire
Cleveland
County Durham
StatusRiding
then Administrative county
Chapman codeNRY
 • HQNorthallerton
Arms of the County Council of the North Riding of Yorkshire

Coat of arms of North Riding County Council

History

During the English Civil War, the North Riding predominantly supported the royalist cause, while other areas of Yorkshire tended to support the parliamentarians.[1]

Governance and administration

The County of York, North Riding administrative county was formed in 1889. In 1894 it was divided into municipal boroughs, urban districts and rural districts under the Local Government Act 1894. Middlesbrough had already been incorporated as a municipal borough in 1853 and formed a county borough, exempt from county council control, from 1889. Richmond and Scarborough had been incorporated as municipal boroughs in 1835, with Thornaby-on-Tees added in 1892.

The urban districts in 1894 were Eston, Guisborough, Hinderwell, Kirkleatham, Kirklington cum Upsland, Loftus, Malton, Masham, Northallerton, Pickering, Redcar, Saltburn and Marske by the Sea, Scalby, Skelton and Brotton and Whitby. In 1922 Redcar was incorporated as a borough.

The rural districts in 1894 were Aysgarth, Bedale, Croft, Easingwold, Flaxton, Guisborough, Helmsley, Kirkby Moorside, Leyburn, Malton, Masham, Middlesbrough, Northallerton, Pickering, Reeth, Richmond, Scarborough, Startforth, Stokesley, Thirsk, Wath and Whitby.

County Review Orders reduced the number of urban and rural districts in the county:[2]

  • Hinderwell urban district was absorbed by Whitby rural district in 1932
  • A new Saltburn and Marske by the Sea urban district was formed from Saltburn by the Sea urban district and part of Guisborough rural district. the remainder of Guisborough RD passed to Loftus urban district and Whitby rural district in 1932
  • Kirklington cum Upsland urban district was absorbed by Bedale rural district in 1934
  • Masham urban district was redesignated as Masham rural district in 1934

In 1968 a new county borough of Teesside was created, taking in Middlesbrough and parts of the administrative counties of Durham and North Riding. From the North Riding came the boroughs of Redcar and Thornaby-on-Tees, the urban district of Eston, and part of Stokesley rural district (although the remainder of the rural district continued as part of the county). The entirety of Teesside, including the parts north of the River Tees historically in Durham, was associated with the North Riding for lieutenancy and other purposes.

In 1974 the North Riding was abolished as both an administrative county and a Lieutenancy. The majority of its former area became part of the new non-metropolitan county of North Yorkshire, which also includes much of the northern rural part of the West Riding as well as the city of York and the northern and western fringes of the traditional East Riding. Middlesbrough and Redcar became part of Cleveland and are now in independent unitary authorities which became part of North Yorkshire for ceremonial purposes. The Startforth Rural District (South Teesdale) was transferred to County Durham, becoming part of the Teesdale district, which was subsequently abolished in 2009.

The North Riding is now represented in the districts of Hambleton, Richmondshire, Ryedale, Scarborough, Middlesbrough, and Redcar and Cleveland, and parts in Harrogate district, Stockton-on-Tees (south of the River Tees) and County Durham. The principal towns are Middlesbrough, Redcar, Whitby, Scarborough and Northallerton.[3]

Proposed resurrection of the name in local government

On three occasions a re-use of the name of the North Riding for local government purposes has been considered. During the 1990s UK local government reform, the Banham Commission suggested uniting Richmondshire, Hambleton, Ryedale and Scarborough districts in a new unitary authority called North Riding of Yorkshire. Later, the government proposed renaming the ceremonial county of North Yorkshire the North Riding of Yorkshire.[4] This was deemed inappropriate and rejected, after a "chorus of disapprobation".[5][6]

During a further local government review in the 2000s as part of the preparations for the regional assembly referendums, a unitary authority with the name North Riding of Yorkshire, consisting of Richmondshire, Hambleton, Ryedale and Scarborough was again suggested.[7] However, the Commission withdrew this in favour or two unitary authorities, one for Hambleton and Richmondshire, the other for Ryedale and Scarborough.[8]

Ancient divisions

Unlike most counties in England, which were divided anciently into hundreds, Yorkshire was divided first into three ridings and then into numerous wapentakes within each riding. Within the North Riding of Yorkshire there were thirteen wapentakes in total, as follows:

Wapentakes

  1. Gilling West
  2. Hang West
  3. Gilling East
  4. Hang East
  5. Allertonshire
  6. Halikeld
  7. Langbaurgh West
Wapentakes
  1. Birdforth
  2. Bulmer
  3. Ryedale
  4. Langbaurgh East
  5. Whitby Strand
  6. Pickering Lythe

See also

References

  1. ^ "Historic Cleveland - Timeline". Historic-Cleveland.co.uk. Archived from the original on 30 November 2007. Retrieved 4 October 2007.
  2. ^ The North Riding of York (Northern Areas) Order 1932, The North Riding of York Review Order 1934
  3. ^ F. R. Youngs, Local Administrative Units of England, Vol.II, Northern England, London, 1991
  4. ^ "House of Commons Written Answers to Questions". Parliamentary Debates (Hansard). House of Commons. 1 February 1995. col. 694.
  5. ^ "House of Commons Written Answers to Questions". Parliamentary Debates (Hansard). House of Commons. 13 February 1995. col. 552.
  6. ^ "House of Commons Debates". Parliamentary Debates (Hansard). House of Commons. 28 February 1995. col. 993.
  7. ^ The Boundary Committee for England (December 2003). Draft Recommendations for unitary local government in North Yorkshire (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 19 January 2018. Retrieved 19 January 2018.
  8. ^ The Boundary Committee for England (May 2004). Final Recommendations for unitary local government in North Yorkshire (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 19 January 2018. Retrieved 19 January 2018.

External links

Coordinates: 54°20′16″N 1°25′43″W / 54.33778°N 1.42861°W

Allertonshire

Allertonshire or Allerton was a wapentake and liberty in the North Riding of Yorkshire, England.It was named after Northallerton (historically Allerton), the county town of the North Riding, and was historically associated with the Bishop of Durham, being an ecclesiastical peculiar until the 19th century.

The contiguous part of the wapentake included the ancient parishes of

Birkby

Kirby Sigston

Leake

Northallerton

Osmotherley

North Otterington

Thornton-le-StreetThe wapentake also included these detached parts:

the extra parochial area of Hutton Conyers

the parish of West Rounton

the parish of Sessay

the Yorkshire part of the parish of Sockburn (townships of Girsby and Over Dinsdale)The wapentake also included part of the parish of Kirklington, including the vill of Howgrave.

Baron Feversham

Baron Feversham is a title that has been created twice, once in the Peerage of Great Britain and once in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. The first creation, in the Peerage of Great Britain, came in 1747 when Anthony Duncombe, who had earlier represented Salisbury and Downton in the House of Commons, was made Lord Feversham, Baron of Downton, in the County of Wilts. He had previously inherited half of the enormous fortune of his uncle Sir Charles Duncombe. However, Lord Feversham had no sons and the barony became extinct on his death in 1763. The peerage was revived in the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1826 in favour of his kinsman Charles Duncombe, who was created Baron Feversham, of Duncombe Park in the County of York. He was a former Member of Parliament for Shaftesbury, Aldborough, Heytesbury and Newport. Duncombe was the grandson of Thomas Duncombe, son of John Brown (who assumed the surname Duncombe) by his wife Ursula Duncombe, aunt of the first Baron of the 1747 creation. Ursula had inherited the other half of her brother Sir Charles Duncombe's fortune. Lord Feversham son, the second Baron, sat as a Conservative Member of Parliament for Yorkshire and the North Riding of Yorkshire.

He was succeeded by his son, the third Baron. He represented East Retford and the North Riding of Yorkshire in the House of Commons as a Conservative. In 1868 he was created Viscount Helmsley, of Helmsley in the North Riding of the County of York, and Earl of Feversham, of Ryedale in the North Riding of the County of York. He was succeeded by his grandson, the second Earl, who sat in Parliament as a Conservative representative for Thirsk and Malton. He was killed in the First World War, when the titles were inherited by his son, the third Earl. He notably served as a Lord-in-waiting (government whip in the House of Lords) from 1934 to 1936 in the National Government. On his death in 1963 the viscountcy and earldom became extinct. However, he was succeeded in the barony of Feversham by his distant relative (his fourth cousin), the sixth Baron. He was the great-great-grandson of Admiral the Honourable Arthur Duncombe, fourth son of the first Baron. As of 2018 the title is held by his eldest son, the seventh Baron, who succeeded in 2009.

Several other members of the Duncombe family have also gained distinction. Anthony Duncombe, father of the first Baron of the 1747 creation, was Member of Parliament for Hedon. The aforementioned Sir Charles Duncombe, uncle of the first Baron of the 1747 creation, was a wealthy banker. Thomas Slingsby Duncombe, nephew of the first Baron of the 1826 creation, was a Radical politician. The aforementioned Admiral Arthur Duncombe, fourth son of the first Baron, was an Admiral in the Royal Navy and Member of Parliament. He was the father of 1) Arthur Duncombe, a Conservative Member of Parliament, and 2) George Augustus Duncombe, who was created a baronet in 1919 (see Duncombe baronets). The Very Reverend Augustus Duncombe (1814–1880), younger son of the first Baron, was Dean of York. The Honourable Octavius Duncombe, younger son of the first Baron, represented the North Riding of Yorkshire in Parliament.

The ancestral seat of the Duncombe family is Duncombe Park near Helmsley, Yorkshire.

Custos Rotulorum of the North Riding of Yorkshire

This is a list of people who have served as Custos Rotulorum of the North Riding of Yorkshire.

Sir Leonard Beckwith bef. 1544 – aft. 1547

Sir Henry Gates bef. 1562–1589

John Stanhope, 1st Baron Stanhope 1545–1621

Sir Thomas Posthumous Hoby 1621–1626

Sir David Foulis, 1st Baronet 1626–1629

Sir Thomas Posthumous Hoby 1629–1640

Henry Belasyse 1641–1646

Interregnum

Thomas Belasyse, 1st Earl Fauconberg 1660–1700

Charles Boyle, 2nd Earl of Burlington 1701–1704

Henry Boyle, 1st Baron Carleton 1704–1715

Richard Boyle, 3rd Earl of Burlington 1715–1722

Conyers Darcy 1722

Richard Boyle, 3rd Earl of Burlington 1722–1733

Thomas Watson-Wentworth, 1st Marquess of Rockingham 1733–1750

Charles Watson-Wentworth, 2nd Marquess of Rockingham 1751–1762

Robert Darcy, 4th Earl of Holderness 1762–1765

Charles Watson-Wentworth, 2nd Marquess of Rockingham 1765–1782

Henry Belasyse, 2nd Earl Fauconberg 1782–1802For later custodes rotulorum, see Lord Lieutenant of the North Riding of Yorkshire.

Flags and symbols of Yorkshire

Flags and symbols of Yorkshire have been used to identify Yorkshire and its related councils through flags and symbols (including coats of arms). This article also includes flags and symbols used by the present and former local authorities covering Yorkshire.

George Robinson, 1st Marquess of Ripon

George Frederick Samuel Robinson, 1st Marquess of Ripon, (24 October 1827 – 9 July 1909), styled Viscount Goderich from 1833 to 1859 and known as the Earl of Ripon in 1859 and as the Earl de Grey and Ripon from 1859 to 1871, was a British politician who served in every Liberal cabinet from 1861 until the year before his death, which took place forty-eight years later in 1909.

Green Howards

The Green Howards (Alexandra, Princess of Wales's Own Yorkshire Regiment), frequently known as the Yorkshire Regiment until the 1920s, was a line infantry regiment of the British Army, in the King's Division. Raised in 1688, it served under various titles until it was amalgamated with the Prince of Wales's Own Regiment of Yorkshire and the Duke of Wellington's Regiment (West Riding), all Yorkshire-based regiments in the King's Division, to form the Yorkshire Regiment (14th/15th, 19th and 33rd/76th Foot) on 6 June 2006.

Holwick

Holwick is a small village in Teesdale, north-east England. Located in the Pennine hills, it consists of a few houses spread along a road in the pattern of a linear settlement. As the population taken at the 2011 Census was less than 100, details are maintained in the parish of Lunedale.

Being south of the Tees, Holwick lies within the historic boundaries of the North Riding of Yorkshire, but along with the rest of the former Startforth Rural District it was transferred to County Durham for administrative and ceremonial purposes on 1 April 1974, under the provisions of the Local Government Act 1972. In May 2013, the newly registered flag of the North Riding was first unveiled at the village, owed to it being one of the most northerly settlements in Yorkshire.It has a public house, the Strathmore Arms, and a campsite. Holwick sits not far from the south bank of the River Tees, about 2 miles north-west of Middleton-in-Teesdale and opposite Newbiggin, both villages on the other side of the river. Nearby are the High Force and Low Force waterfalls. The surrounding landscape is high moorland and fells.

John Holles, 1st Duke of Newcastle

John Holles, 1st Duke of Newcastle-upon-Tyne , KG, PC (9 January 1662 – 15 July 1711) was an English peer.

John Sheffield, 1st Duke of Buckingham and Normanby

John Sheffield, 1st Duke of Buckingham and Normanby, (7 April 1648 – 24 February 1721) was an English poet and Tory politician of the late Stuart period who served as Lord Privy Seal and Lord President of the Council. He was also known by his original title, Lord Mulgrave.

Langbaurgh East

Langbaurgh East was a wapentake of the North Riding of Yorkshire, the eastern division of Langbaurgh, England. The name is now in use as a local justice area (formerly a petty sessional division), consisting of the eastern, mostly rural part of the borough of Redcar and Cleveland.

The East Wapentake in particular covered roughly the area of modern-day Redcar & Cleveland and the northern most parts of the Scarborough district. The boundary roughly follows from Wilton along to Redcar in the north and all the way down to Whitby in the south across to Danby, west of Whitby then back up along the Cleveland Hills back up to Wilton.

Langbaurgh Wapentake

Langbaurgh was a wapentake (hundred), or liberty, of the North Riding of Yorkshire. It covered an area on the northern coast of the county, including Middlesbrough, Easby, Great Ayton, Guisborough, Marske-by-the-Sea, Maltby, Easington, Redcar, and Whitby - the Cleveland area.

The wapentake had two divisions, the western and eastern.

The wapentake took its name from the hamlet of Langbaurgh, near Great Ayton. The name was re-used for the non-metropolitan district of Langbaurgh, later Langbaurgh-on-Tees, created in 1974, which covered the area of the eastern division. It has been known since 1996 as the unitary authority of Redcar and Cleveland.

List of windmills in North Yorkshire

This is a list of windmills in the English county of North Yorkshire.

Lord Lieutenant of North Yorkshire

The position of Lord Lieutenant of North Yorkshire was created on 1 April 1974.

Since 1996 the position has included the areas south of the River Tees in the former county of Cleveland. Upon the dissolution of Cleveland, Lord Gisborough was made joint lord-lieutenant of North Yorkshire. North Yorkshire is the largest lieutenancy region in England, that in 2018, had a population of over 1,135,000.

1 April 1974 – 1987: Oswald Phipps, 4th Marquess of Normanby (previously Lord Lieutenant of the North Riding of Yorkshire)

1987–1999: Sir Marcus Worsley, with a lieutenant:1996–2001: Richard Chaloner, 3rd Baron Gisborough (formerly Lord Lieutenant of Cleveland)1999–2014: James Dugdale, 2nd Baron Crathorne

2014–2018: Barry Dodd

2018– Johanna Ropner

Lord Lieutenant of the North Riding of Yorkshire

The post of Lord Lieutenant of the North Riding of Yorkshire was created in 1660, at the Restoration, and was abolished on 31 March 1974. From 1782 until 1974, all Lords Lieutenant were also Custos Rotulorum of the North Riding of Yorkshire.

North Riding County Football Association

The North Riding County Football Association, also simply known as the North Riding FA, is the governing body of football in the North Riding of Yorkshire. Its headquarters are located in the town of Stokesley, seven miles south of Middlesbrough. Affiliated members pay a fee commensurate with the level of competition they play in. Affiliated members benefit from access to support and guidance on such areas as health and safety and access to finance or grants. The County FA is directly responsible for the governance of County Cup competitions.

North Riding of Yorkshire (UK Parliament constituency)

North Riding of Yorkshire was a parliamentary constituency in the North Riding of Yorkshire. It returned two Members of Parliament to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

The constituency was created by the Reform Act 1832, when the four-seat Yorkshire constituency was divided in three for the 1832 general election. It was abolished by the Redistribution of Seats Act 1885, and replaced for the 1885 general election by the new single-member constituencies of Cleveland, Richmond, Thirsk & Malton and Whitby.

Robert Darcy, 3rd Earl of Holderness

Robert Darcy, 3rd Earl of Holderness, (24 November 1681 – 20 January 1721) was a British peer and politician.

Robin Turton, Baron Tranmire

Robert Hugh Turton, Baron Tranmire, (8 August 1903 – 17 January 1994) was a British Conservative Party politician.

North Riding of Yorkshire
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