Norman Barry

Norman Christopher Barry (December 25, 1897 – October 13, 1988) was an American judge, politician, and football coach.

Norman Barry
Born:December 25, 1897
Chicago, Illinois
Died:October 13, 1988 (aged 90)
Chicago, Illinois
Career information
Position(s)Quarterback, halfback
CollegeNotre Dame
Career history
As coach
1925–1926Chicago Cardinals
As player
1921Chicago Cardinals
1921Green Bay Packers
1922Milwaukee Badgers
Career highlights and awards
Career stats

Political and judicial career

Barry was born in Chicago, Illinois. He went to the Chicago public schools and then went to the Notre Dame preparatory school for thirteen years, from grade school to law school. He then received his law degree from the Notre Dame Law School and was admitted to the Illinois bar in 1928. Barry was involved with the Democratic Party in Chicago. Barry served in the Illinois Senate from 1943 until 1953. He then served as an Illinois circuit court judge for Cook County, Illinois from 1953 until his retirement in 1978. He then resumed practicing law in Chicago. He died on October 13, 1988 at Northwestern Memorial Hospital after suffering a heart attack while at his law office.[1][2][3]

Football career

He was the head coach for the National Football League's Chicago Cardinals from 1925 to 1926. With Norman Barry as head coach the Cardinals outdistanced a field of 20 teams to win their first NFL championship in 1925 by virtue of the league's best record. In two seasons, he compiled a record of 16–8–2. Prior to his coaching career, he played in the early NFL for the Cardinals, Green Bay Packers and Milwaukee Badgers. Barry was George Gipp's teammate at the University of Notre Dame.[4][5]

References

  1. ^ 'Illinois Blue Book 1953-1954,' Biographical Sketch of Norman C. Barry, pg. 224-225
  2. ^ 'Judge Norman Barry, Former Coach,' Chicago Tribune, Kenan Heise, October 16, 1988
  3. ^ 'Former Irish star Norman Barry dies,' Ellensburg Daily Record (Washington (state)), October 15, 1988, pg. 11
  4. ^ 'NFL Head Coaches-A Biographical Dictionary, 1920-2011,' John Maxymuk, McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers: 2012, Biographical Sketch of Norman Barry, pg. 266-256
  5. ^ Pro-Football Reference Norm Barry

External links

1925 NFL season

The 1925 NFL season was the sixth regular season of the National Football League. Five new teams entered the league: New York Giants, Detroit Panthers, Pottsville Maroons, Providence Steam Roller, and a new Canton Bulldogs team. The Kenosha Maroons folded, with the Racine Legion and Minneapolis Marines mothballing.

Barry Dodds

Norman Barry Dodds (born April 1943) is a Church of Ireland priest.Dodds was educated at the Open University and the Church of Ireland Theological College; and ordained in 1977. After a curacy at Ballynafeigh he was the incumbent at St Michael, Belfast from 1980 until 2014; and from 2009 until 2013 the inaugural Archdeacon of Belfast.

Bobby Thomason

Robert Lee "Bobby" Thomason (March 26, 1928 – November 5, 2013) was an American football quarterback in the National Football League for the Los Angeles Rams, Green Bay Packers, and the Philadelphia Eagles. He was selected to three Pro Bowls. Thomason played college football at Virginia Military Institute and was drafted in the first round of the 1949 NFL Draft.

Thomason married Jean Pierce in 1951. They had one daughter. Both survived him, as, in 2013, he died of heart failure at the age of 85.

Cecil Isbell

Cecil Frank Isbell (July 11, 1915 – June 23, 1985) was an American football Quarterback and coach. He played five years in the National Football League (NFL) with the Green Bay Packers, leading them to the NFL Championship in 1939. He retired after the 1942 season to become an assistant coach at his alma mater, Purdue University, and the following year became its head coach for three seasons.Isbell was the head coach of the Baltimore Colts of the All-America Football Conference from 1947 to 1949, resigning after four winless games. He then became an assistant under former head coach Curly Lambeau, now with the Chicago Cardinals. When Lambeau resigned late in the 1951 season, Isbell was the interim head coach for the final two games, which they split. Isbell's pro head coaching record was 10–23–1. He was hired as an assistant coach with the Dallas Texans if the NFL in 1952. Isbell was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a player in 1967.

David Whitehurst

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Dewey Scanlon

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Don Milan

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Fred Gillies

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Fred later married Blanche Wilderand and adopted Theo Janet Howells, the biological daughter of Blanche's sister, Gertrude Wilder. Gillies also worked and volunteered for the Republican Party.

In 1932, he was a survivor in a plane crash that took the life of aviator Eddie Stinson, the founder of Stinson Aircraft Company. Gillies suffered a leg injury, as a result of the accident, which left him in a leg brace for the rest of his life.

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LeRoy Andrews

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Lipkin Gorman v Karpnale Ltd

Lipkin Gorman v Karpnale Ltd [1988] UKHL 12 (6 June 1991) is a foundational English unjust enrichment case. The House of Lords unanimously established that the basis of an action for money had and received is the principle of unjust enrichment, and that an award of restitution is subject to a defence of change of position. This secured unjust enrichment English law as the third pillar of the law of obligations, along with contract and tort. It has been called a landmark decision.Although the case is most famous for the transformative judgment handed down by the House of Lords in relation to restitution and unjust enrichment, the decision of the Court of Appeal is also an important banking law decision in its own right, setting out key principles relating to the duty of care owed by bankers to their customers. There was no appeal against that part of the decision to the House of Lords.

List of Arizona Cardinals head coaches

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Luther Fuller

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Norman P. Barry

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Paul Fitzgibbon

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Randy Wright

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Roger Grove

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Stan Heath (gridiron football)

Stanley Robert Heath (March 5, 1927 – September 26, 2010) was a quarterback in the National Football League who played 12 games for the Green Bay Packers. In 1949, the Green Bay Packers used the 5th pick in the 1st round of the 1949 NFL Draft to sign Heath out of the University of Nevada, Reno, where he was the nation's top passer. Previously, he had been a member of the Wisconsin Badgers. Heath was the first NCAA quarterback to throw for over 2,000 yards in a season, a mark that would not be surpassed for fifteen years. He finished 5th in the Heisman Trophy voting in 1948. Heath only played one season with the Packers before moving to the Canadian Football League.

Heath is the son of former major league baseball player Mickey Heath, the uncle of attorney and TruTV television commentator Robert W. Bigelow, and cousin to broadcaster and author Jim Heath.

Heath died at his home in Jesup, Georgia.

Norman Barry—championships

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