Norm Snead

Norman Bailey Snead (born July 31, 1939) is a former American football quarterback in the National Football League for the Washington Redskins, Philadelphia Eagles, Minnesota Vikings, New York Giants, and San Francisco 49ers. He played college football for Wake Forest University and was drafted in the first round (second overall pick) of the 1961 NFL Draft.

Norm Snead
No. 16
Position:Quarterback
Personal information
Born:July 31, 1939 (age 79)
Halifax County, Virginia
Career information
High school:Warwick
(Newport News, Virginia)
College:Wake Forest
NFL Draft:1961 / Round: 1 / Pick: 2
AFL draft:1961 / Round: 5 / Pick: 35
(by the Buffalo Bills)
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
TDINT:196–257
Yards:30,797
QB rating:65.5
Player stats at NFL.com

Early life

Snead grew up in Newport News, Virginia, the son of Hugh, a farmer, and Louise Snead.[1] He attended Warwick High School, where he was a star three-sport (basketball, football and baseball) athlete. He won all six pitching decisions as a sophomore and junior, and he averaged 23 points in basketball as a senior, scoring 41 in one game. He split time as starting quarterback as a junior, then as a senior he passed for nearly 1,000 yards and 13 touchdowns. In a game against Hampton, he threw what would be the game-winning touchdown pass, then intercepted a pass on Hampton's next series to seal the outcome. He was named second-team all-state.[2] He graduated in 1957.[3]

College career

Snead went to Wake Forest University, where he set 15 conference single-games, season and career passing records.[4] His passing statistics with the Demon Deacons included:

  • 1958: 67-151 for 1,003 yards.[5]
  • 1959: 82-191 for 1,361 yards.
  • 1960: 123-259 for 1,676 yards.

In 1958, he was named the second-team All-Atlantic Coast Conference quarterback, and in 1959 and 1960 he earned first-team All-ACC honors. In 1960, he was named second-team All-American as a quarterback by UPI and the Football Writers Association of America.[6]

In 1984, he was inducted into the Virginia Sports Hall of Fame.

NFL career

He was named to the Pro Bowl on four occasions; in 1962, 1963, 1965, and in 1972, when he led the NFL in completion percentage and was second in passer rating.[7] Ironically, he remains the last quarterback to win a game despite having a passer rating of zero, on November 14, 1976, against his former team, the Washington Redskins, winning that game while completing 3 of 14 passes for 26 yards in a game that had no touchdowns, winning 12-9. He retired after the 1976 season.[8]

Coaching career

Snead was the 27th and then later the 29th head football coach at The Apprentice School in Newport News, Virginia, and he held that position for 10 seasons, from 1977 until 1984 and again from 1988 until 1989, when he resigned as coach and admissions director.[9] After inheriting a team that was 0–9 the previous season, his coaching record at Apprentice was 46–41–2.[10]

See also

References

  1. ^ https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VRBQ-N3W
  2. ^ http://articles.dailypress.com/2004-09-26/sports/0409230365_1_tommy-reamon-warwick-high-michael-vick
  3. ^ https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1298&dat=19840327&id=9fpNAAAAIBAJ&sjid=hYsDAAAAIBAJ&pg=5046,937441
  4. ^ http://vshfm.com/inductees/inductee_details.php?inducteeID=233
  5. ^ https://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/players/norm-snead-1.html
  6. ^ http://www.wakeforestsports.com/sports/m-footbl/spec-rel/091907aab.html
  7. ^ pro-football-reference.com
  8. ^ https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1298&dat=19770520&id=IOFNAAAAIBAJ&sjid=MYsDAAAAIBAJ&pg=6794,2600504
  9. ^ http://articles.dailypress.com/1990-07-24/sports/9007230381_1_graduate-assistant-william-and-mary-football-coach
  10. ^ Apprentice Builders coaching records Archived December 2, 2008, at the Wayback Machine

External links

1959 Wake Forest Demon Deacons football team

The 1959 Wake Forest Demon Deacons football team was an American football team that represented Wake Forest University during the 1959 NCAA University Division football season. In their fourth season under head coach Paul Amen, the Demon Deacons compiled a 6–4 record and finished in a tie for fourth place in the Atlantic Coast Conference.Quarterback Norm Snead and end Pete Manning were selected by the Associated Press and United Press International as first-team players on the 1959 All-Atlantic Coast Conference football team. Snead later played 16 seasons in the NFL and was a four-time All-Pro selection. Guard Nick Patella was selected to the All-ACC team by the UPI.

1960 Wake Forest Demon Deacons football team

The 1960 Wake Forest Demon Deacons football team was an American football team that represented Wake Forest University during the 1960 NCAA University Division football season. In its first season under head coach Billy Hildebrand, the team compiled a 2–8 record and finished in seventh place in the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC).Quarterback Norm Snead was selected by the United Press International as a first-team player on the 1960 All-Atlantic Coast Conference football team. Snead later played 16 seasons in the NFL and was a four-time All-Pro selection.

1967 New Orleans Saints season

The 1967 New Orleans Saints season was the inaugural season for the franchise. The team went 3–11, finishing in last place in the four-team NFL Eastern Conference Capitol Division.

1968 Philadelphia Eagles season

The 1968 Philadelphia Eagles season was the franchise's 36th season in the National Football League (NFL). They failed to improve on their previous output of 6–7–1, winning only two games. Eagles fans expected to get O.J. Simpson if they went winless. They finished 2–12, but the Buffalo Bills went 1–12–1 and got Simpson with the first pick. Before they won their twelfth game, the Eagles were on target for a winless season at 0–11. They were the first team in the NFL proper to lose eleven consecutive games in one season since their own 1936 season, though in the AFL the 1962 Oakland Raiders lost their first thirteen games.

One of the most infamous incidents in Philadelphia sports history came at halftime of the final game of the dismal 1968 season, when the Eagles were on their way to losing to the Minnesota Vikings. The Eagles had planned a Christmas pageant for halftime of the December 15 game, but the condition of the field was too poor. Instead, the team asked a fan dressed as Santa Claus to run onto the field to celebrate with a group of cheerleaders. The fans, in no mood to celebrate, loudly booed and threw snowballs at “Santa Claus.”

1970 Philadelphia Eagles season

The 1970 Philadelphia Eagles season was their 38th in the league. They failed to improve on their previous output of 4–9–1, winning only three games. The team failed to qualify for the playoffs for the tenth consecutive season.

The Eagles did have victories over the playoff-bound Dolphins and the cross-state rival Steelers, as well as a 23–20 victory on Monday Night Football over the Giants, ending New York's six-game winning streak and helping deny Big Blue a playoff berth.

1972 Minnesota Vikings season

The 1972 season was the Minnesota Vikings' 12th in the National Football League. It marked the return of Fran Tarkenton to the Vikings after he had been traded to the New York Giants in 1967. In return, Minnesota sent three players to the Giants (Norm Snead, Bob Grim and Vince Clements), plus a first and second round draft choice. Tarkenton's return also led to the previous season's QB, Gary Cuozzo, being traded to the St. Louis Cardinals in a deal which sent wide receiver John Gilliam to the Vikings along with second- and fourth-round draft picks in 1973. Cardinals coach Bob Hollway was familiar with Cuozzo, having served as Minnesota's defensive coordinator under Bud Grant prior to leaving for St. Louis in 1971.

The Vikings finished with a record of seven wins and seven losses and failed to improve on their 11–3 record from 1971. This would be one of only two times during the 1970s in which the Vikings failed to reach the playoffs, as they would win the NFC Central six straight years from 1973–1978 before posting a 7–9 record in 1979. The Vikings started the season with just one win in their first four games, including a surprising 19-17 loss to the lightly-regarded Cardinals in week four, when Gary Cuozzo bested his former team as Vikings kicker Fred Cox hit the upright on a potential game-winning field goal. The team recovered from their slow start, winning five of their next six to sit at 6–4. However, the Vikings would lose three of their final four games to finish the season at an even 7–7.

1972 New York Giants season

The 1972 New York Giants season was the franchise's 48th season in the National Football League (NFL). The Giants had an 8–6 record and finished in third place in the National Football Conference East Division, three games behind the Washington Redskins.The Giants had two first-round selections in the 1972 NFL Draft, and chose Eldridge Small and Larry Jacobson with the 17th and 24th overall picks, respectively. Before the season, New York traded their starting quarterback, Fran Tarkenton, to the Minnesota Vikings for a package of players and draft picks that included quarterback Norm Snead, who led the league in pass completion average in 1972. The Giants lost twice to open the season, but went on a four-game winning streak afterwards. In their 11th game, the Giants defeated the Philadelphia Eagles 62–10, setting the franchise record for the most points scored in a game; it was also an Eagles record for the most points allowed. The victory put the team at 7–4 and in contention for a playoff berth. Two losses ended their postseason chances, but New York beat the Dallas Cowboys in the final game of the season to finish with 8 wins in 14 games. Halfback Ron Johnson scored nine touchdowns on running plays to top the NFL, and his 1,182 rushing yards broke the Giants' single-season record. This was the last winning season for the Giants until 1981.

Al Conover

Al Conover (born 1938) is a former American football player and coach. Most notably, he served as head coach at Rice University from 1972 to 1975, compiling a record of 15–27–2 in four seasons before resigning to enter private business.

A native of Largo, Florida, Conover attended Largo High School, where he starred on the football squad and earned an athletic scholarship to Wake Forest University. He spent four years on the Demon Deacon squad, protecting quarterback Norm Snead as tackle under coaches Paul Amen and Billy Hildebrand. Returning to Largo after graduation, he served as his alma mater's head swimming coach and assistant football mentor.In 1963, he was hired as a graduate assistant by Florida State University head coach Bill Peterson, and later became offensive line coach. After helping the Seminoles to a Gator Bowl appearance in 1967, Conover was hired by Y C McNease at Idaho. When Peterson moved on to Rice University in 1971, he hired Conover as offensive coordinator. Peterson left for the Houston Oilers one season later, and Conover was selected as his successor.In his first year as Rice head coach, he guided the Owls to a 5–5–1 record, the program's best since 1963. Known for his flamboyance, he brought a coffin onto the practice field to "bury" the Owls' mistakes during the 1973 season. Following a 3–8 season in 1975, Conover resigned to enter private business.

Gary Cuozzo

Gary Samuel Cuozzo (born April 26, 1941) is a former professional American football player. An undrafted quarterback from the University of Virginia, Cuozzo played in 10 NFL seasons from 1963 to 1972. He began his NFL career on the Baltimore Colts as a backup to Johnny Unitas. When Unitas was injured in 1965, Cuozzo replaced him until getting sidelined by injury as well, forcing coach Don Shula to use running back Tom Matte as an emergency quarterback.

He was traded to the expansion team New Orleans Saints in 1967, where he was the first starting quarterback in the franchise's history. However, the trade was disastrous for New Orleans, which gave away the first overall pick in the 1967 NFL draft to the Colts, who used it to select Michigan State All-American Bubba Smith, who became an All-Pro and was Baltimore's starting left defensive end in Super Bowl III and V.

After losing the Saints' starting job later in 1967 to Billy Kilmer, he was traded to the Minnesota Vikings. He became the Vikings' starting quarterback in 1970 when Joe Kapp, the team's Most Valuable Player in 1969, held out and was traded to the Boston Patriots. Cuozzo was named NFC Player of the Week for leading the Vikings to a 27-10 victory over the Kansas City Chiefs in a rematch of Super Bowl IV in the season opener.

The 1970 Vikings posted the NFL's best regular season record at 12-2, but lost in an NFC Divisional playoff game to the San Francisco 49ers at home. In 1971, Cuozzo could not hold on to his starting job, sharing duties with Norm Snead and Bob Lee. The Vikings went 11-3 in the regular season and lost in the divisional playoffs at home to the eventual Super Bowl champion Dallas Cowboys.

After the 1971 season, the Vikings reacquired Fran Tarkenton from the New York Giants, with Snead and the Vikings' leading receiver from 1971, Bob Grim, going to the Big Apple. Tarkenton played his first six seasons (1961-66) in Minnesota, coinciding with the Vikings' first six seasons in the NFL.

Cuozzo was traded to the St. Louis Cardinals in the deal which sent fleet wide receiver John Gilliam to the Vikings. Cardinals coach Bob Hollway was familiar with Cuozzo, having served as Minnesota's defensive coordinator under Bud Grant prior to leaving for St. Louis in 1971.

Cuozzo was part of a chaotic four-quarterback rotation with Jim Hart, Pete Beathard, and Tim Van Galder in 1972, but when Don Coryell took over as Cardinals coach in 1973, he named Hart the undisputed starter, and he would hold the job into the 1980s.

Following his retirement in 1973, Cuozzo moved to Middletown Township, New Jersey, to start an orthodontics practice.

In 1990, his oldest son Gary Jr., a/k/a Chip, was murdered in Miami during a drug deal, and Cuozzo gave talks to teens about avoiding drugs. He served as national chairman of the Fellowship of Christian Athletes from 1995 to 1998.Cuozzo played high school football at Glen Ridge High School in Glen Ridge, New Jersey.

H. K. Brown Jr.

H. K. Brown Jr. is a former American football coach. He was the 20th head football coach at The Apprentice School in Newport News, Virginia and he held that position for the 1964 season. His coaching record at Apprentice was 0–8.

James H. Wilson (American football)

James H. "Jimmy" Wilson (March 6, 1940 – March 27, 2013) was an American football coach. He was the 25th head football coach at The Apprentice School in Newport News, Virginia and he held that position for four seasons, from 1971 until 1974. His coaching record at Apprentice was 13–20.

John A. Burns (American football)

John A. Burns was an American football coach. He was the 13th and then later the 18th head football coach at The Apprentice School in Newport News, Virginia. He and he held that position for three seasons, from 1951 to 1952 and again in 1962. His coaching record at Apprentice was 5–20.

List of New York Giants starting quarterbacks

These quarterbacks have started at least one game for the New York Giants of the National Football League. They are listed in order of the date of each player's first start at quarterback for the Giants.

List of Philadelphia Eagles starting quarterbacks

These quarterbacks have started at least one game for the Philadelphia Eagles of the National Football League. They are listed in order of the date of each player's first start at quarterback for the Eagles.

List of San Francisco 49ers starting quarterbacks

These quarterbacks have started at least one game for the San Francisco 49ers of the National Football League. They are listed in order of the date of each player's first start at quarterback for the 49ers.

List of Washington Redskins starting quarterbacks

These quarterbacks have started at least one game for the Washington Redskins of the National Football League, and its predecessors the Boston Braves (1932) and Boston Redskins (1933–1936). The Washington Redskins franchise was founded in Boston, Massachusetts as the Boston Braves, named after the local baseball franchise. The name was changed the following year to the Redskins. For the 1937 NFL season, the franchise moved to Washington, D.C., where it remains based.Of the 50 Redskins starting quarterbacks, two have been inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame: Sammy Baugh and Sonny Jurgensen.

Phil Janaro

Philip Janaro (born December 23, 1942) is a former American football coach.

Romie Hamilton

Romie L. Hamilton (July 29, 1922 – December 15, 2005) was an American football coach. He was the 21st head football coach at The Apprentice School in Newport News, Virginia and he held that position for the 1965 season. His coaching record at Apprentice was 0–8–1.

He attended West Virginia University Institute of Technology and Dunbar High School.Hamilton also coached Warwick High School in Newport News, being named head coach there in 1956.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.