Norm Siebern

Norman Leroy "Norm" Siebern (July 26, 1933 – October 30, 2015) was a Major League Baseball player for the New York Yankees, Kansas City Athletics, Baltimore Orioles, California Angels, San Francisco Giants, and Boston Red Sox from 1956 to 1968. His best season came in 1962 with the A's, when he hit 25 home runs, had 117 runs batted in and a .308 batting average. He might be most remembered however, as being one of the players the Yankees traded for Roger Maris. He was signed by Yankees scout Lou Maguolo.[1]

Siebern played for the 1956 and 1958 World Series champion Yankees, and nine years later returned to the '67 Series with the Red Sox.

On December 11, 1959, he was part of a seven-player trade that sent him along with World Series heroes Don Larsen and Hank Bauer to the Kansas City A's in exchange for outfielder Roger Maris and two other players.[2] Maris ended up breaking Babe Ruth's single-season home run record in 1961.

The Orioles acquired Siebern on November 27, 1963 in an exchange of starting first basemen, sending Jim Gentile and $25,000 to the Athletics. He spent two seasons in Baltimore, losing his starting spot in the middle of 1965 to Boog Powell, who successfully made the transition from the outfield. Siebern was traded to the Angels on December 2, 1965 for outfielder Dick Simpson. Seven days later, Simpson would be one of three players sent to the Cincinnati Reds for Frank Robinson.[3]

Siebern made the American League All-Star teams in 1962, 1963 and 1964.

He had 1,217 hits for his career, with 132 home runs and a lifetime batting average of .272. Defensively, his career fielding percentage was .991. At first base his fielding percentage was .992 and as an outfielder was .984.

Siebern attended Southwest Missouri State, where he played basketball with future New York baseball teammate Jerry Lumpe on a team that won two NAIA Championships in 1952 and 1953. Both players had to miss some tournament games to report to baseball spring training camp with the Yankees.

Norm Siebern
Norm Siebern 1961
First baseman / Left fielder
Born: July 26, 1933
St. Louis, Missouri
Died: October 30, 2015 (aged 82)
Naples, Florida
Batted: Left Threw: Right
MLB debut
June 15, 1956, for the New York Yankees
Last MLB appearance
July 30, 1968, for the Boston Red Sox
MLB statistics
Batting average.272
Home runs132
Runs batted in636
Teams
Career highlights and awards

References

  1. ^ "Lou Maguolo". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 17 June 2015.
  2. ^ Maris goes to Yanks; A's get Larsen in 7-man deal
  3. ^ Hawkins, John C. This Date in Baltimore Orioles & St. Louis Browns History. Briarcliff Manor, NY: Stein & Day, 1983.

External links

1956 New York Yankees season

The 1956 New York Yankees season was the 54th season for the team in New York, and its 56th season overall. The team finished with a record of 97–57, winning their 22nd pennant, finishing 9 games ahead of the Cleveland Indians. New York was managed by Casey Stengel. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they defeated the Brooklyn Dodgers in 7 games. The Series featured the only no-hitter in Series play, a perfect game, delivered by the Yankees' Don Larsen in Game 5.

1958 New York Yankees season

The 1958 New York Yankees season was the 56th season for the team in New York, and its 58th season overall. The team finished with a record of 92–62, winning their 24th pennant, finishing 10 games ahead of the Chicago White Sox. In the World Series, they defeated the Milwaukee Braves in 7 games. New York was managed by Casey Stengel. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. In 1958, the Yankees became New York City's only professional baseball team after the Brooklyn Dodgers moved to Los Angeles and the New York Giants left for San Francisco. The Yankees would hold this distinction until 1962, when the New York Mets began play.

1958 World Series

The 1958 World Series was a rematch of the 1957 World Series, with the New York Yankees beating the defending champion Milwaukee Braves in seven games for their 18th title, and their seventh in 10 years. With that victory, the Yankees became only the second team in Major League Baseball history to come back from a 3–1 deficit to win a best-of-seven World Series; the first was the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1925. (The 1903 Boston Red Sox came back from a 3–1 deficit in a best-of-nine affair.) These teams would meet again in the fall classic thirty-eight years later—by that time, the Braves had moved to Atlanta. As of 2019, this is the most recent World Series featuring the two previous Series winning teams.

1960 Kansas City Athletics season

The 1960 Kansas City Athletics season was the sixth in Kansas City and the 60th overall. It involved the A's finishing 8th in the American League with a record of 58 wins and 96 losses, 39 games behind the AL Champion New York Yankees.

1962 Kansas City Athletics season

The 1962 Kansas City Athletics season was the eighth season in Kansas City, and the 62nd in franchise history. It involved the Athletics finishing ninth in the American League with a record of 72 wins and 90 losses, 24 games behind the World Series Champion New York Yankees. The A's were last in the American League in paid attendance.

1963 Kansas City Athletics season

The 1963 Kansas City Athletics season was the ninth for the franchise in Kansas City and the 63rd overall. It involved the A's finishing 8th in the American League with a record of 73 wins and 89 losses, 31½ games behind the AL Champion New York Yankees. The 1963 season was also the first season in which the Athletics debuted their current color scheme of green and gold.

1963 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1963 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 34th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 9, 1963 in Cleveland, Ohio, at Cleveland Municipal Stadium, home of the American League's Cleveland Indians. The game was won by the National League 5–3.

From 1959 to 1962, baseball experimented with a pair of All-Star Games per year. That ended with this 1963 game, which also marked the 30th anniversary of the inaugural All-Star Game played in Chicago in 1933.

1964 Baltimore Orioles season

The 1964 Baltimore Orioles season involved the Orioles finishing 3rd in the American League with a record of 97 wins and 65 losses, two games behind the AL champion New York Yankees. Baltimore spent 92 days in first place during the season before relinquishing that position on September 18.

1964 Kansas City Athletics season

The 1964 Kansas City Athletics season was the tenth for the franchise in Kansas City and the 64th overall. It involved the A's finishing 10th in the American League with a record of 57 wins and 105 losses, 42 games behind the American League Champion New York Yankees.

1965 Baltimore Orioles season

The 1965 Baltimore Orioles season involved the Orioles finishing 3rd in the American League with a record of 94 wins and 68 losses.

1966 Baltimore Orioles season

The 1966 Baltimore Orioles season involved the Orioles finishing first in the American League with a record of 97 wins and 63 losses, nine games ahead of the runner-up Minnesota Twins. It was their first AL pennant since 1944, when the club was known as the St. Louis Browns. The Orioles swept the NL champion Los Angeles Dodgers in four games to register their first-ever World Series title. The team was managed by Hank Bauer, and played their home games at Memorial Stadium. They drew 1,203,366 fans to their home ballpark, third in the ten-team league. It would be the highest home attendance of the team's first quarter-century at Memorial Stadium, and was eclipsed by the pennant-winning 1979 Orioles.

1966 California Angels season

The 1966 California Angels season, the team's first in Anaheim, involved the Angels finishing 6th in the American League with a record of 80 wins and 82 losses, 18 games behind the AL and World Series Champion Baltimore Orioles.

1967 California Angels season

The 1967 California Angels season involved the Angels finishing 5th in the American League with a record of 84 wins and 77 losses, 7½ games behind the AL Champion Boston Red Sox.

1967 San Francisco Giants season

The 1967 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 85th year in Major League Baseball, their tenth year in San Francisco since their move from New York following the 1957 season, and their eighth at Candlestick Park. The team finished in second place in the National League with a record of 91 wins and 71 losses, 10½ games behind the NL and World Series champion St. Louis Cardinals.

1968 Boston Red Sox season

The 1968 Boston Red Sox season was the 68th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished fourth in the American League (AL) with a record of 86 wins and 76 losses, 17 games behind the AL and World Series champion Detroit Tigers.

1974 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 1974 followed the system in place since 1971.

The Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from recent major league players and

elected two, Whitey Ford and Mickey Mantle.

The Veterans Committee met in closed sessions to consider executives, managers, umpires, and earlier major league players.

It selected three people: Jim Bottomley, Jocko Conlan, and Sam Thompson.

The Negro Leagues Committee also met in person and selected Cool Papa Bell.

Jerry Lumpe

Jerry Dean Lumpe (June 2, 1933 – August 15, 2014) was a Major League Baseball second baseman for the New York Yankees (1956–59), Kansas City Athletics (1959–63) and Detroit Tigers (1964–67).Lumpe was a member of the 1958 World Series championship team, appearing in six games for the Yankees. He started three of them at third base, including the decisive Game 7 victory over the Milwaukee Braves. He also played for New York in the previous year's World Series, won in seven games by the Braves.

He was traded on May 26, 1959 by the Yankees along with pitchers Johnny Kucks and Tom Sturdivant to the Kansas City A's in exchange for outfielder Hector Lopez and pitcher Ralph Terry.

Late in his career, in his first season with Detroit, he was named to the 1964 American League All-Star team.

Lumpe was raised in Warsaw, Missouri. He and future Yankee teammate Norm Siebern had been basketball players together for Missouri State University, when the school was known as Southwest Missouri State, where they won two NAIA Championships in 1952 and 1953, although both needed to miss some tournament games to report to baseball spring training camp. Lumpe maintained strong ties to the university and died in 2014 in Springfield, Missouri, the school's home.

He finished 25th in voting for the 1962 American League MVP for playing in 156 Games and had 641 At Bats, 89 Runs, 193 Hits, 34 Doubles, 10 Triples, 10 Home Runs, 83 RBI, 44 Walks, .301 Batting Average, .341 On-base percentage, .432 Slugging Percentage, 277 Total Bases, 6 Sacrifice Hits and 9 Sacrifice Flies.

In 12 seasons he played in 1,371 Games and had 4,912 At Bats, 620 Runs, 1,314 Hits, 190 Doubles, 52 Triples, 47 Home Runs, 454 RBI, 20 Stolen Bases, 428 Walks, .268 Batting Average, .325 On-base percentage, .356 Slugging Percentage, 1,749 Total Bases, 57 Sacrifice Hits, 36 Sacrifice Flies and 21 Intentional Walks.

Len Gabrielson

Leonard Gary Gabrielson (born February 14, 1940) is a retired outfielder in Major League Baseball. He graduated from the University of Southern California and played in the majors from 1960 through 1970, initially signing with the Milwaukee Braves in 1959 as an amateur free agent.

After parts of three seasons with the Braves, he was traded to the Chicago Cubs on June 3, 1964, in exchange for catcher Merritt Ranew and $40,000. Two weeks later, the Cubs traded their starting right fielder Lou Brock to the St. Louis Cardinals, and installed Gabrielson as Brock's replacement.

He lasted less than a year with the Cubs, moving on to the San Francisco Giants in a five-player deal on May 29, 1965. The Giants received Gabrielson and catcher Dick Bertell, in return for Harvey Kuenn and Ed Bailey and pitcher Bob Hendley. Gabrielson gradually worked his way into a role as the team's starting left fielder, a role he successfully defended in spring training of 1966, beating back a challenge by Orlando Cepeda, who had been displaced from first base by Willie McCovey. He struggled with the bat that season, however, and in December was traded to the California Angels for first baseman Norm Siebern.

Gabrielson's stay with the Angels lasted all of eleven games, as the Angels sent him to the Los Angeles Dodgers for Johnny Werhas on May 10, 1967. It would be the final trade of Gabrielson's career, as he spent the next four seasons with Los Angeles. He led the team in home runs with ten in 1968, an unusually low total made possible by league-wide offensive declines that season, the so-called "Year of the Pitcher".

His father, Leonard Hilbourne Gabrielson, was also an MLB player, having spent part of the 1939 season with the Philadelphia Phillies.

Lou Maguolo

Louis Dewey Maguolo (8 June 1899 – 14 May 1977) was an American Major League Baseball executive. A baseball scout for the St. Louis Browns and New York Yankees, he was best known for signing Yankee greats Bill Skowron, Tony Kubek, Fritz Peterson, Jim Bouton, and Elston Howard. He is credited with signing at least 40 athletes who eventually played in the major leagues, ten of them for the Browns, including Al LaMacchia, Don Lenhardt, Marlin Stuart, Fuzz White, Jackie Juelich, Babe Martin, George Hausmann, and Roy Sievers. Others signed for the Yankees include Whitey Herzog, Cal Neeman, Norm Siebern, Lee Thomas, Jim Robertson, Jay Ward, Bob Keegan, Herb Plews, Lou Skizas, Bob Wiesler, Al Pilarcik, Bud Zipfel, Paul Hinrichs, Zach Monroe, Lloyd Merritt, Steve Kraly, Tom Metcalf, Mike Jurewicz, Hal Stowe, Joe Pactwa, Larry Murray, Jerry Lumpe, Jerry Kenney, Dave Bergman, and Dennis Werth.Maguolo was Head Scout for the Browns and Chief Midwest Scout for the Yankees. His territory usually covered the St. Louis area of Missouri, all of Illinois and Wisconsin, the western half of Kentucky, and western half of Indiana. He was based in St. Louis, Missouri.

Though only 5'5" tall and 112 pounds, Maguolo made the all-city team in St. Louis as an outfielder at Yeatman High School, where he also quarterbacked the football team. He was named to the all-Missouri Valley Conference baseball and football teams as a student-athlete at Washington University in St. Louis. His father, however, often told him, "Baseball is a bum's game, and so is football," and withheld his allowance in high school and financial assistance for college. Maguolo helped pay for college on barnstorming baseball teams with other college players, including future major league player and manager Eddie Dyer. Maguolo performed under the name "Meyers" to avoid losing his college athletic eligibility. He graduated from Washington University with a degree in civil engineering, but he pursued a baseball career instead, at first as baseball coach for McKinley and Beaumont high schools in St. Louis. While coaching, he began working as a "bird dog" or assistant scout for the Brooklyn Dodgers. At the urging of his childhood friend Andy High, an infielder for the Dodgers and St. Louis Cardinals, he became a scout for the St. Louis Browns in 1936. Soon after, the Browns made him Head Scout, a position he held until 1942, when he went into the Army for World War II. In 1947 the New York Yankees hired him as a scout. The Yankees' mandatory retirement policy required him to step down as Chief Midwest Scout in 1970, but he continued to scout part time for New York until October 1975.

During World War II, Maguolo served in the US Army in the Pacific Northwest. His duties were primarily in Special Services Recreation, and he attained the rank of major.The son of a furniture maker, Maguolo spent his off seasons working at Century Skilcraft Co., the family furniture factory in St. Louis, where he built back bars, stools, lamps, chairs, and stairways out of broken bats and other sports equipment.

In the 1950s, Maguolo hired and trained legendary Yankee scout Art Stewart. He reportedly gave Stewart this advice: "Keep your eyes open. Keep your ears open. Keep your mouth shut." Then, the story goes, Maguolo zipped his mouth, for emphasis.

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