Norfolk County, Massachusetts

Norfolk County is a county located in the U.S. state of Massachusetts. At the 2010 census, the population was 670,850.[1] Its county seat is Dedham.[2] The county was named after the English county of the same name.[3] Two towns, Cohasset and Brookline, are exclaves.

Norfolk County is included in the Boston-Cambridge-Newton, MA-NH Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Norfolk County is the 28th highest-income county in the United States with a median household income of $81,899. It is the wealthiest county in Massachusetts.

Norfolk County, Massachusetts
County
County of Norfolk
NorfolkCoCourt
Norfolk County Courthouse in Dedham
Flag of Norfolk County, Massachusetts
Flag
Seal of Norfolk County, Massachusetts
Seal
Motto: Antiquity, Perseverance, History, Industry
Map of Massachusetts highlighting Norfolk County

Location within the U.S. state of Massachusetts
Map of the United States highlighting Massachusetts

Massachusetts's location within the U.S.
Founded1793
Named forNorfolk
SeatDedham
Largest cityQuincy
Area
 • Total444 sq mi (1,150 km2)
 • Land396 sq mi (1,026 km2)
 • Water48 sq mi (124 km2), 11%
Population (est.)
 • (2018)705,388
 • Density1,694/sq mi (654/km2)
Congressional districts2nd, 4th, 7th, 8th
Time zoneEastern: UTC−5/−4
Websitewww.norfolkcounty.org

History

Norfolk County, Massachusetts was created on March 26, 1793 by legislation signed by Gov. John Hancock. Most of the towns were originally part of Suffolk County, Massachusetts. The towns of Dorchester and Roxbury were part of Norfolk County when it was created but, as Boston annexed each town, they became part of Suffolk County again. Hingham and Hull were originally part of the Norfolk County legislation but petitioned to remain in Suffolk county and in June 1793 their removal to Norfolk county was repealed. Later, in 1803, they were moved into Plymouth County, Massachusetts. The county is the birthplace of four Presidents of the United States (John Adams, John Quincy Adams, John F. Kennedy, and George H.W. Bush), resulting in the moniker "County of Presidents."[4]

Sheriffs

There have been 21 sheriffs of Norfolk County.[5]

Years Sheriff[5]
2018–present Jerry McDermott
1999–2018 Michael G. Bellotti
1996–1999 John H. Flood
1975–1996 Clifford H. Marshall
1961–1975 Charles Hedges
1958–1961 Peter M. McCormack
1939–1958 Samuel Wragg
1898–1939 Samuel Capen
1885–1898 Augustus B. Endicott
1878–1885 Rufus Corbin Wood
1857–1878 John W. Thomas
1853–1857 Thomas Adams
1852–1853 John W. Thomas
1848–1852 Thomas Adams
1843–1848 Jerauld N. E. Mann
1834–1843 John Baker, II
1812–1834 Elijah Crane
1811–1812 William Brewer
1810–1811 Elijah Crane
1798–1810 Benjamin Clark Cutler
1794–1798 Atherton Thayer
1793–1794 Ebeneezer Thayer

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 444 square miles (1,150 km2), of which 396 square miles (1,030 km2) is land and 48 square miles (120 km2) (11%) is water.[6] It is the third-smallest county in Massachusetts by total area. The county is not completely contiguous; the towns of Brookline and Cohasset are each part of Norfolk County but are separated from the majority of Norfolk County (and each other) by either water or other counties. At the county's formation, Hingham and Hull were to be part of it, but joined Plymouth County instead, leaving Cohasset as the initial exclave of Norfolk County and an enclave of Plymouth County. Brookline became the second exclave of Norfolk County in 1873 when the neighboring town of West Roxbury was annexed by Boston (thus leaving Norfolk County to join Suffolk County) and Brookline refused to be annexed by Boston after the Brookline-Boston annexation debate of 1873.

Adjacent counties

National protected areas

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
180027,216
181031,24514.8%
182036,47116.7%
183041,97215.1%
184053,14026.6%
185078,89248.5%
1860109,95039.4%
187089,443−18.7%
188096,5077.9%
1890118,95023.3%
1900151,53927.4%
1910187,50623.7%
1920219,08116.8%
1930299,42636.7%
1940325,1808.6%
1950392,30820.6%
1960510,25630.1%
1970605,05118.6%
1980606,5870.3%
1990616,0871.6%
2000650,3085.6%
2010670,8503.2%
Est. 2018705,388[7]5.1%
U.S. Decennial Census[8]
1790-1960[9] 1900-1990[10]
1990-2000[11] 2010-2018[1]
Norfolk CountyMA Commission
Norfolk County Administration Offices (including the County Commissioners and the County Treasurer) in Dedham.

2000 census

As of the census[12] of 2000, there were 650,308 people, 248,827 households, and 165,967 families residing in the county. The population density was 1,628 people per square mile (628/km²). There were 255,154 housing units at an average density of 639 per square mile (247/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 89.02% White or European American, 3.18% Black or African American, 0.13% Native American, 5.50% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.78% from other races, and 1.37% from two or more races. 1.84% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 28.6% were of Irish, 13.4% Italian, 7.7% English and 5.0% descendants of colonists ancestry according to Census 2000. 85.7% spoke English, 2.3% Chinese in any dialect, 2.0% Spanish, 1.0% Italian and 1.0% French as their first language.

There were 248,827 households out of which 31.20% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.20% were married couples living together, 9.50% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.30% were non-families. 26.80% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.80% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.54 and the average family size was 3.14.

In the county, the population was spread out with 23.40% under the age of 18, 7.00% from 18 to 24, 31.60% from 25 to 44, 23.50% from 45 to 64, and 14.40% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 91.40 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.60 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $63,432, and the median income for a family was $77,847 (these figures had risen to $77,294 and $95,243 respectively as of a 2007 estimate[13]). Males had a median income of $51,301 versus $37,108 for females. The per capita income for the county was $32,484. About 2.90% of families and 4.60% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.40% of those under age 18 and 5.70% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 670,850 people, 257,914 households, and 168,903 families residing in the county.[14] The population density was 1,693.6 inhabitants per square mile (653.9/km2). There were 270,359 housing units at an average density of 682.5 per square mile (263.5/km2).[15] The racial makeup of the county was 82.3% white, 8.6% Asian, 5.7% black or African American, 0.2% American Indian, 1.3% from other races, and 1.9% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 3.3% of the population.[14] The largest ancestry groups were:[16]

  • 31.8% Irish
  • 15.5% Italian
  • 11.0% English
  • 7.0% German
  • 4.6% French
  • 4.3% Chinese
  • 4.1% Polish
  • 3.2% Russian
  • 3.1% American
  • 2.8% Scottish
  • 2.6% French Canadian
  • 2.4% Scotch-Irish
  • 2.0% West Indian
  • 2.0% Sub-Saharan African
  • 1.9% Portuguese
  • 1.8% Swedish
  • 1.6% Indian
  • 1.4% Arab
  • 1.4% Greek
  • 1.2% Canadian
  • 1.1% Vietnamese
  • 1.1% Lithuanian

Of the 257,914 households, 32.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.0% were married couples living together, 10.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 34.5% were non-families, and 27.6% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.53 and the average family size was 3.15. The median age was 40.7 years.[14]

The median income for a household in the county was $81,027 and the median income for a family was $101,870. Males had a median income of $68,070 versus $51,870 for females. The per capita income for the county was $42,371. About 4.1% of families and 6.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.3% of those under age 18 and 6.9% of those age 65 or over.[17]

Demographic breakdown by town

Income

The ranking of unincorporated communities that are included on the list are reflective if the census designated locations and villages were included as cities or towns. Data is from the 2007-2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates.[18][19][20]

Rank Town Per capita
income
Median
household
income
Median
family
income
Population Number of
households
Dover CDP $91,039 $183,125 $212,125 2,322 725
1 Dover Town $82,800 $184,646 $200,735 5,564 1,765
2 Wellesley Town $65,394 $145,208 $175,156 27,818 8,553
3 Brookline Town $63,964 $97,250 $142,180 58,371 24,891
4 Needham Town $60,972 $121,080 $160,455 28,786 10,350
5 Cohasset Town $59,891 $117,831 $147,222 7,483 2,706
6 Westwood Town $59,422 $120,078 $151,976 14,508 5,172
7 Medfield Town $56,905 $128,446 $139,247 12,004 4,011
Chestnut Hill (02467) ZCTA $55,947 $114,140 $151,375 21,952 6,237
8 Sharon Town $53,687 $121,265 $142,463 17,538 6,268
Medfield CDP $47,660 $107,386 $127,632 6,394 2,357
9 Wrentham Town $47,119 $100,938 $119,188 10,879 3,978
Sharon CDP $46,079 $102,521 $124,405 5,532 2,007
10 Canton Town $45,991 $90,951 $111,770 21,408 8,460
11 Milton Town $44,718 $104,713 $129,234 26,828 8,956
12 Medway Town $44,472 $106,058 $119,864 12,670 4,433
13 Walpole Town $43,983 $90,763 $109,035 23,862 8,626
Norfolk County County $43,685 $83,733 $106,309 666,426 255,944
14 Norfolk Town $42,452 $118,809 $132,250 11,151 3,125
15 Foxborough Town $42,236 $92,370 $108,209 16,734 6,470
Walpole CDP $41,820 $89,327 $99,808 6,119 2,522
16 Dedham Town $41,143 $83,364 $105,586 24,521 9,528
Millis-Clicquot CDP $39,884 $82,798 $103,750 4,370 1,831
17 Millis Town $39,344 $90,360 $99,976 7,852 3,043
18 Franklin City $39,043 $92,066 $109,602 31,317 10,866
19 Braintree City $37,317 $83,710 $97,262 35,409 13,267
20 Plainville Town $36,802 $81,371 $102,780 8,176 3,232
Foxborough CDP $36,239 $61,771 $91,991 5,206 2,388
21 Norwood Town $35,997 $73,838 $95,397 28,483 11,559
22 Weymouth City $35,939 $68,594 $86,972 53,565 22,543
Massachusetts State $35,051 $65,981 $83,371 6,512,227 2,522,409
Bellingham CDP $33,927 $81,941 $87,606 4,580 1,833
23 Bellingham Town $33,170 $83,534 $93,655 16,165 5,879
24 Quincy City $32,911 $60,947 $77,231 91,484 39,965
25 Stoughton Town $32,363 $68,191 $87,070 26,893 10,455
26 Avon Town $31,304 $72,880 $89,214 4,341 1,609
27 Holbrook Town $29,940 $63,790 $76,568 10,749 4,193
28 Randolph City $29,210 $64,465 $77,661 31,867 12,041
United States Country $27,915 $52,762 $64,293 306,603,772 114,761,359

Religion

Religious Affiliation in Norfolk County
Year 1980 1990 2000 2010
Religion C* A** C A C A C A
Anabaptist (Mennonite) n/a n/a 1 88 1 45 n/a n/a
Ba'haism 0 n/a 0 n/a 2 180 1 198
Baptist 29 7,063 29 7,936 32 4,992 46 5,558
Brethren 3 95 1 50 0 n/a 0 n/a
Buddhism n/a n/a n/a n/a 4 n/a 7 1,653
Catholicism 64 304,137 63 336,797 63 380,930 52 355,321
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints 1 432 2 648 5 1,150 4 1,262
Congregationalism/

United Church of Christ

35 16,786 43 19,016 41 22,049 42 12,879
Christian Science n/a n/a 7 350 n/a n/a 5 n/a
Episcopalianism/

Anglicanism

31 17,955 30 12,905 31 12,778 33 11,016
Hinduism n/a n/a n/a n/a 6 n/a 2 37
Independent/

nondenominational

n/a n/a 1 800 n/a n/a 20 2,620
Islam n/a n/a n/a n/a 2 3,782 3 4,616
Jainism n/a n/a n/a n/a 1 n/a 1 n/a
Judaism 20 8,258 41 37,123 41 38,300 20 19,709
Lutheranism 13 4,629 10 2,843 8 2,593 8 2,227
Methodism/Holiness 25 7,937 21 7,114 24 7,097 23 5,667
Messianic Judaism n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a 1 n/a
Orthodoxy n/a n/a 3 n/a 7 7,543 9 3,539
Pentecostalism 5 945 5 1,382 12 2,540 17 2,485
Presbyterianism 4 1,380 7 1,424 7 1,558 9 1,196
Seventh-day Adventism/

Jehovah's Witnesses

1 52 7 2,900 5 367 8 537
Sikhism n/a n/a n/a n/a 2 n/a 1 n/a
Quakerism 1 192 1 190 2 106 2 224
Unitarian-Universalism 18 4,719 17 4,591 17 2,644 17 3,102
Zoroastranianism n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a 0 16

*congregations

**adherents

Politics

As like the majority of Massachusetts, Norfolk county leans sufficiently democratic. The last time they voted for a republican candidate was in 1984, during Ronald Reagan's landslide victory where in which he carried all States except Minnesota and Washington, D.C.

Voter registration and party enrollment as of October 13, 2010[21]
Party Number of voters Percentage
Democratic 159,956 35.28%
Republican 53,556 11.81%
Unenrolled 237,810 52.45%
Minor Parties 2,054 0.45%
Total 453,376 100%

Communities

Cities

Towns

Note: West Roxbury (annexed to Boston 1874), Roxbury (annexed to Boston 1868), Dorchester (founded 1630, annexed to Boston 1870), Hyde Park (incorporated 1868 from Dorchester, Milton, and Dedham, annexed to Boston 1912), and Hingham and Hull were originally part of Norfolk County when the county was incorporated in 1793. As of August 2012, Hingham's Precinct 2 will be part of the Fourth Norfolk District.[23]

Census-designated places

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 26, 2013.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ Thomas Cox, Anthony Hall, Robert Morden, Magna Britannia Antiqua & Nova: Or, A New, Exact, and Comprehensive Survey of the Ancient and Present State of Great Britain, Volume 5, (Caesar Ward and Richard Chandler: London, 1738), pg. 171 (accessed on Google Book Search, June 22, 2008)
  4. ^ The County of Norfolk, Massachusetts. Last accessed December 21, 2006.
  5. ^ a b "History". Norfolk County Sheriff's Office. Retrieved October 25, 2016.
  6. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on September 14, 2014. Retrieved September 16, 2014.
  7. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved May 15, 2019.
  8. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 16, 2014.
  9. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved September 16, 2014.
  10. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 16, 2014.
  11. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 16, 2014.
  12. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  13. ^ Bureau, U.S. Census. "American FactFinder - Community Facts". factfinder.census.gov.
  14. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 12, 2016.
  15. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 12, 2016.
  16. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 12, 2016.
  17. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 12, 2016.
  18. ^ "SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS 2007-2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved January 26, 2013.
  19. ^ "ACS DEMOGRAPHIC AND HOUSING ESTIMATES 2007-2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved January 26, 2013.
  20. ^ "HOUSEHOLDS AND FAMILIES 2007-2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved January 26, 2013.
  21. ^ "Registration and Party Enrollment Statistics as of October 15, 2008" (PDF). Massachusetts Elections Division of the Secretary of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Retrieved May 8, 2012.
  22. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org.
  23. ^ Dever, Maryellen. "REDISTRICTING: Bradley loses precinct". wickedlocal.com.

External links

Coordinates: 42°10′N 71°11′W / 42.17°N 71.19°W

Bellingham, Massachusetts

Bellingham is a town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, United States. The population was 16,332 at the 2010 census. The town sits on the southwestern fringe of Metropolitan Boston, along the rapidly growing "outer belt" that is Route 495. It is formally a part of the Boston–Cambridge–Quincy metropolitan statistical area, as well as the Providence metropolitan area.For geographic and demographic information on the census-designated place Bellingham, please see the article Bellingham (CDP), Massachusetts.

Big Quamino Rock (Massachusetts)

Big Quamino Rock is a barren, uninhabited island located in Cohasset Harbor in Cohasset, Massachusetts.

Blue Hills Reservation

Blue Hills Reservation is a 6,000-acre (2,400 ha) state park in Norfolk County, Massachusetts. Managed by the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation, it covers parts of Milton, Quincy, Braintree, Canton, Randolph, and Dedham. Located approximately ten miles south of downtown Boston, the reservation is one of the largest parcels of undeveloped conservation land within the Greater Boston metropolitan area. The park's varied terrain and scenic views make it a popular destination for hikers from the Boston area.

Braintree, Massachusetts

Braintree (US: ), officially the Town of Braintree, is a suburban New England city in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, United States. Although officially known as a town, Braintree adopted a municipal charter, effective 2008, with a mayor-council form of government, and is considered a city under Massachusetts law. The population was 35,744 at the 2010 census. The town is part of the Greater Boston area with access to the MBTA Red Line, and is a member of the Metropolitan Area Planning Council's South Shore Coalition. The first and current mayor of Braintree is Joe Sullivan.Braintree, Massachusetts is named after Braintree, Essex in England. The town was first chartered in 1640. Later, some sections of Braintree formed separate municipalities: Quincy (1792), Randolph (1793), and Holbrook (1872).

Charles River Peninsula

The Charles River Peninsula is a 30-acre (12 ha) nature preserve in Needham, Massachusetts owned and managed by the Trustees of Reservations. The Charles River turns nearly 180 degrees, creating the peninsula. A 20-acre (8 ha) field on the peninsula has been farmed for roughly a century. The original acreage was given in 1960; additional land was given in 1994.

Childs Island (Massachusetts)

Childs Island is a small heavily forested island located north of the Stop River in the wetlands of Medfield Rhododendrons in Medfield, Massachusetts.

Cocasset River

The Cocasset River is a small river in Foxborough, Massachusetts. It flows approximately 4.7 miles (7.5 km) in a southwesterly direction to where it joins the Wading River near Green Street. It is a tributary of the Taunton River.

Dean College

Dean College is a private college in Franklin, Massachusetts. It grants associate degrees in 20 majors and bachelor's degrees in 13 majors.

Elm Bank Horticulture Center

The Gardens at Elm Bank, home of Massachusetts Horticultural Society, occupies 36 acres (15 ha) of Elm Bank Reservation, a 175-acre (71 ha) recreational area of woodlands, fields, and former estate property on the Charles River managed by the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation. The estate's entrance is located at 900 Washington Street (Route 16), Wellesley, Massachusetts, United States, with the major portion of the grounds located in the neighboring town of Dover. In 1987, the entire site was added to the National Register of Historic Places as Elm Bank.

Foxborough, Massachusetts

Foxborough is a town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, United States, about 22 miles (35 km) southwest of Boston, 18 miles (29 km) northeast of Providence, Rhode Island and about 73 miles (117 km) northwest of Cape Cod. Foxborough is part of the Boston metropolitan statistical area. The population was 16,865 at the 2010 census.

"Foxborough" is the official spelling of the town name, although the alternative spelling "Foxboro" is also frequently used. This alternative spelling is used by the United States Postal Service as the correct form by which to address mail to recipients in the town although both can be processed by their system. The sign on the post office reads "Foxboro".

The town is best known as the site of Gillette Stadium, home of the New England Patriots of the National Football League and the New England Revolution of Major League Soccer.

Fresh River (Massachusetts)

The Fresh River is a tributary of the Weymouth Back River in Norfolk and Plymouth counties, Massachusetts in the United States.

Holbrook, Massachusetts

Holbrook is a town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, United States. At the 2010 census, the town population was 10,791.

Medfield Meadow Lots

Medfield Meadow Lots are a group of wetland meadows—Pratt Meadow, Perry Meadow, and Hinsdale Meadow—located in the Charles River floodplain within Medfield, Massachusetts, United States. The lots, totaling 16 acres (6.5 ha), are accessible by canoe or kayak only. They were acquired as an open space reserve via land donation by Henry L. Shattuck in 1968.

The Medfield Meadow Lots are part of a cooperative effort of non-profit organizations and public agencies to protect the natural and ecological character of the Charles River. Including the meadow lots, The Trustees of Reservations has protected over 4,000 acres (1,600 ha) of land on the Charles River floodplain.

National Register of Historic Places listings in Norfolk County, Massachusetts

This is a list of properties and historic districts listed on the National Register of Historic Places in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, other than those within the city of Quincy and the towns of Brookline and Milton. Norfolk County contains more than 300 listings, of which the more than 100 are not in the above three communities are listed below. Some listings extend across municipal boundaries, and appear on more than one list.

The locations of National Register properties and districts (at least for all showing latitude and longitude coordinates below) may be seen in a map by clicking on "Map of all coordinates".

This National Park Service list is complete through NPS recent listings posted June 14, 2019.

Needham, Massachusetts

Needham is a town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, United States. A suburb of Boston, its population was 30,999 at the 2017 census. It is home to the Olin College, an engineering school.

Randolph, Massachusetts

The town of Randolph is a suburban town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, United States. At the 2010 census, the town population was 32,158. Randolph adopted a new charter effective January 2010 providing for a council-manager form of government instead of the traditional town meeting. Randolph is one of thirteen Massachusetts municipalities that have applied for, and been granted, city forms of government but wish to retain "The town of” in their official names.

Sargent's Pond

Sargent's Pond is a man-made 3-acre (1.2 ha) pond on Sargent Road in Brookline, Massachusetts. The pond was created by Charles Sprague Sargent (best known as the first director of the Arnold Arboretum) in the late 1870s as a centerpiece of his family's extensive Holm Lea estate. Sargent's estate has since been subdivided, but the roads giving access to it run along the estate's original alignments. Sargent landscaped the estate using similar principles to those he applied at the Arboretum, with vistas and a variety of trees and shrubs. The pond was created by damming a brook. It still has naturalistic plantings around it, although some Sargent's rhododendrons (a significant draw on occasions when he opened the estate to the public) have died.The pond (along with its immediately surrounding grounds) was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1985.

Sharon, Massachusetts

Sharon is a town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, United States. The population was 17,612 at the 2010 census. Sharon is part of Greater Boston, about 17 miles (27 km) southwest of downtown Boston.

Weir River (Massachusetts)

Weir River is a short stream and estuary that empties into Hingham Bay, part of Boston Harbor in Massachusetts, United States. The name is attributed to the location of a fishing weir in the stream. The river gives its name to a larger watershed and Weir River Farm, a park and nature reserve owned by The Trustees of Reservations.

Atlantic Ocean
Gulf of Maine
Long Island Sound
Narragansett Bay
Upper New York Bay
Places adjacent to Norfolk County, Massachusetts
Municipalities and communities of Norfolk County, Massachusetts, United States
Cities
Towns
CDPs
Other
villages
Topics
Society
Regions
Counties
Cities
Counties
Major cities
Cities and towns
100k-250k
Cities and towns
25k-100k
Cities and towns
10k-25k
Sub-regions
Massachusetts public high schools
Barnstable County
Berkshire County
Bristol County
Dukes County
Essex County
Franklin County
Hampden County
Hampshire County
Middlesex County
Nantucket County
Norfolk County
Plymouth County
Suffolk County
Worcester County

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.