Nolan Cromwell

Nolan Neil Cromwell (born January 30, 1955) is a former American football player and coach. He was an All-Pro safety for the Los Angeles Rams of the NFL and played for the University of Kansas in college, where he earned All-American honors. Cromwell played for the Rams from 1977 through 1987 and was named to the Pro Bowl in four consecutive years, 1980 through 1983. He played on the Rams' 1979–1980 Super Bowl XIV team. He was the Rams' wide receivers coach from 2010 to 2011.

Nolan Cromwell
No. 21
Position:Defensive back
Personal information
Born:January 30, 1955 (age 64)
Smith Center, Kansas
Height:6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Weight:200 lb (91 kg)
Career information
College:Kansas
Career history
As player:
As coach:
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Interceptions:37
INT yards:671
Touchdowns:4
Player stats at NFL.com

Early years

Cromwell played in the town of Ransom, Kansas while attending Logan High School as a freshman, helping the basketball team win a state championship. When his family moved to Ransom, Cromwell earned the nickname the "Ransom Rambler" while attending Ransom High School as a standout in football, basketball and track. He was a national AAU junior champion in the decathlon, a three-time state champion in track and earned consensus All-State honors in football and basketball. He was named the Wichita Eagle's high school football player of the decade for the 1970s.[1]

Playing career

College

Cromwell was an honorable mention All-America quarterback for the University of Kansas Jayhawks under Coach Bud Moore. He started at quarterback for two seasons, throwing 92 passes and completing 33 for 606 yards. He is one of KU's ten 1,000-yard rushers in school history.

As a freshman in 1973 under Coach Don Fambrough, he was the starting free safety in the Liberty Bowl. After being a two-year starter and All Big 8 performer at safety, he made the move to quarterback where he broke several KU, Big Eight and NCAA records for rushing by a quarterback. In 1975, Cromwell rushed 294 and 187 yards in the Oregon State and Wisconsin games, respectively, and finished the season with 1,124 rushing yards. He also scored a touchdown in a 23-3 win over the University of Oklahoma who were ranked #1 at the time and the defending national champions. In 1975, he was named Big 8 Offensive Player of the Year by the AP. Despite playing in just 18 games on offense at Kansas (he suffered a season-ending knee injury in his senior year when the Jayhawks were 5-1 and ranked in the top 10), he is 13th on the school's all-time rushing charts and is the top rushing quarterback. He holds the Kansas record for most rushes (24) by a Kansas player in a Bowl game (set vs. Pittsburgh in the 1975 Sun Bowl).

Cromwell also earned All-America honors in the 600-yard run and the 440 intermediate hurdles while setting KU records in the 600-meter and 400-meter yard runs, the intermediate hurdles (a record he still holds at 49:47) and the decathlon and qualified for the US Olympic trials in the low hurdles.[2]

He was part of the Big-8 champion mile relay team in 1975 and 1976 and was the Big-8 440-yd/400-meter hurdle champ in both 1975 and 1976. With Cromwell's contributions the 1975 Jayhawk track team finished ranked second in the NCAA in outdoor track and fifth in indoor track while capturing both titles for the Big-8 Conference. In 1976 they repeated as Big-8 indoor champs and were second in outdoor while finishing tied for 9th in the NCAA in indoor competition and tied for 20th in outdoor competition.

Cromwell was inducted into the Kansas Sports Hall of Fame in 1996.

NFL

Cromwell was drafted by the Los Angeles Rams as a defensive back in the second round, with the 32nd pick, in 1977 and played his entire 11-year career in Los Angeles. He was the Rams' nickelback in 1977 and 1978 and a standout on special teams; running a fake field goal as a holder was Cromwell's specialty. In 1979, he won the starting free safety position and was named second-team All-NFC.

He was named the 1980 NFC Defensive Player of the Year by UPI and by the Kansas Committee of 101, and was named by Football Digest as the NFL Defensive Back of the Year in four consecutive years: 1980 through 1983. He was also selected to play in four consecutive Pro Bowls, from 1980–1983. Cromwell was part of the Rams defenses that performed well in the late 1970s as well as the Top 10 defenses of 1985 and 1986 when Rams qualified for the playoffs five of his last six seasons.

At the time of his retirement, he was the Rams' all-time leader in interception return yardage with 671 yards on 37 interceptions. After retirement, he was named to the NFL 1980s All-Decade Team and the Orange County Sports Hall of Fame. The Professional Football Researchers Association named Cromwell to the PRFA Hall of Very Good Class of 2014 [3]

Along with his various accomplishments on the field, Cromwell also starred and "danced" in the 1986 Rams promotional video Let's Ram It,[4] rapping "I like to ram it, as you can see, nobody likes ramming it more than me," after introducing himself as "Hollywood handsome, Dodge City tough."[5]

Coaching career

NFL

After retirement as an active player, Cromwell began his coaching career with the Rams. He served as a defensive and special teams assistant in 1991 before being hired by Mike Holmgren to coach special teams for the Green Bay Packers in 1992. From 1992–97, Cromwell headed up the special teams for the Packers. The Packers' punt return unit led the NFL in 1996 with a 15.1-yard return average. Five different times during the 1996 season, one of Cromwell's players was honored as Special Teams Player of the Week. Also in 1996, the Packers won Super Bowl XXXI against the New England Patriots in New Orleans with special teams player Desmond Howard winning the Super Bowl MVP honors. The following year, the Packers reached Super Bowl XXXII in San Diego against the Denver Broncos. In 1998, he moved from special teams to coach the Packers' wide receivers and Cromwell worked with the wide receivers at Green Bay in 1998 helping Pro Bowler Antonio Freeman lead the NFL with 1,424 yards on 84 catches

After two Super Bowl appearances with Green Bay, in 1996 and 1997, Cromwell followed Holmgren to the Seattle Seahawks to coach the wide receivers. Cromwell's 2002 wide receiver corps set a franchise record for 300-yard (five) and 400-yard (two) passing games and in 2003 helped quarterback Matt Hasselbeck set a club record with 3,841 passing yardsIn Seattle, Cromwell again made a Super Bowl appearance as a coach during the Seahawks' 2005 season.

Cromwell was hired by the St. Louis Rams as their wide receivers coach on February 10, 2010. Cromwell and the entire coaching staff were fired following the 2011 season in which the team posted a 2–14 record.

On January 18, 2012, Nolan Cromwell was hired as the Senior Offensive Assistant of the Cleveland Browns.

College

On January 5, 2008, Texas A&M head coach Mike Sherman named Cromwell to be his offensive coordinator.[6] When asked by media as to why he chose Cromwell, Sherman responded "I’ve always been impressed with him and the job he did in (the NFL). He's excited about being part of college football."[7]

On February 10, 2010, Cromwell returned to the NFL as a wide receiver coach for the Rams and worked with the likes of Donnie Avery, Mark Clayton, Brandon Gibson, and other to get into synch with new Rams quarterback Sam Bradford.[8]

Personal life

Nolan married former Rams cheerleader and Miss Hollywood USA 1980–81 Mary Lynne Gehr. They have two children, Lance and Jennifer.

References

  1. ^ "Aggies' McGee: A perfect fit". Archived from the original on October 29, 2013.
  2. ^ "Cromwell takes run at bettering A&M offense".
  3. ^ "Professional Researchers Association Hall of Very Good Class of 2014". Retrieved November 10, 2016.
  4. ^ "Rams". Los Angeles Times. November 13, 1986. p. 129. Retrieved April 18, 2018 – via newspapers.com.
  5. ^ "Ram IT (NFL Rams Football Team) Song". Retrieved April 17, 2018 – via YouTube.
  6. ^ Texas A&M Athletics Cromwell Named Texas A&M Offensive Coordinator Archived January 7, 2008, at the Wayback Machine
  7. ^ "Big 12 Buzz: Lane adjustment".
  8. ^ Rams Hire Nolan Cromwell as WRs coach
1975 All-Big Eight Conference football team

The 1975 All-Big Eight Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Eight Conference teams for the 1975 NCAA Division I football season. The selectors for the 1975 season included the Associated Press (AP).

1975 Kansas Jayhawks football team

The 1975 Kansas Jayhawks football team represented the University of Kansas in the Big Eight Conference during the 1975 NCAA Division I football season. In their first season under head coach Bud Moore, the Jayhawks compiled a 7–5 record (4–3 against conference opponents), finished in fourth place in the conference, and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 262 to 180. They played their home games at Memorial Stadium in Lawrence, Kansas.

The team's statistical leaders included Nolan Cromwell with 333 passing yards and 1,223 rushing yards, and Waddell Smith with 205 receiving yards. Rick Kovatch, John Morgan, and Steve Taylor were the team captains.

1975 Sun Bowl

The 1975 Sun Bowl was a college football postseason bowl game that featured the Pittsburgh Panthers and the Kansas Jayhawks.

1976 Kansas Jayhawks football team

The 1976 Kansas Jayhawks football team represented the University of Kansas in the Big Eight Conference during the 1976 NCAA Division I football season. In their second season under head coach Bud Moore, the Jayhawks compiled a 6–5 record (2–5 against conference opponents), finished in seventh place in the conference, and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 260 to 251. They played their home games at Memorial Stadium in Lawrence, Kansas.

The team's statistical leaders included Nolan Cromwell with 273 passing yards, Laverne Smith with 978 rushing yards, and Waddell Smith with 221 receiving yards. Cromwell and Chris Golub were the team captains.

1980 All-Pro Team

The 1980 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, Pro Football Weekly, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 1980. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the five teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. Pro Football Weekly chose a nose tackle due to the proliferation of 3-4 defenses in the NFL. They, and The Sporting News chose two inside linebackers.

1981 All-Pro Team

The 1981 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, Pro Football Weekly, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 1981. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the five teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. The Associated Press added a "nose tackle" position in 1981, joining Pro Football Weekly .

1981 Pro Bowl

The 1981 Pro Bowl was the NFL's 31st annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1980 season. The game was played on Sunday, February 1, 1981, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii. The final score was NFC 21, AFC 7.Sam Rutigliano of the Cleveland Browns led the AFC team against an NFC team coached by Atlanta Falcons head coach Leeman Bennett. The referee was Gordon McCarter.

1982 All-Pro Team

The 1982 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League (NFL) players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly in 1982. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the four teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. The Sporting News did not choose a 1982 All-Pro team due to the players' strike.

1983 All-Pro Team

The 1983 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, Pro Football Weekly, and The Sporting News in 1983. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the five teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. The NEA chose two inside linebackers for the first time, as a reflection of the 3-4 which was the common alignment for NFL defenses in the mid-1980s.

1983 Los Angeles Rams season

The 1983 Los Angeles Rams season was the team's 46th year with the National Football League and the 38th season in the city of Los Angeles. The franchise drafted a future Hall of Fame Running Back in Eric Dickerson. The season saw the team attempt to improve on its 2-7 record from 1982. The team started out 5-2 before splitting their next 4 games and then lost at home to Washington to sit at 7-5. They would split their last 4 games to finish 9-7 and make the playoffs for the first time since 1980 after a 2-year absence. In the playoffs, they defeated the Cowboys 24-17 in Dallas to advance to the Divisional Round. However, in the game, the Rams were annihilated 51-7 by the Redskins, who would move on to the Super Bowl later, only to lose to the Los Angeles Raiders, 38-9.

1984 Pro Bowl

The 1984 Pro Bowl was the NFL's 34th annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1983 season. The game was played on Sunday, January 29, 1984, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii before a crowd of 50,445. The final score was NFC 45, AFC 3.

Chuck Knox of the Seattle Seahawks led the AFC team against an NFC team coached by San Francisco 49ers head coach Bill Walsh. The referee was Jerry Seeman.Joe Theismann of the Washington Redskins was named the game's Most Valuable Player. Players on the winning NFC team received $10,000 apiece while the AFC participants each took home $5,000.

1986 Los Angeles Rams season

The 1986 Los Angeles Rams season was the franchise's 49th season in the National Football League, their 39th overall, and their 41stin the Greater Los Angeles Area. The season began with the Rams looking to improve on their 11–5 record from 1985, which ended with them getting shut out by the Chicago Bears in the NFC Championship Game, 24–0. The Rams began the season with three straight wins against the St. Louis Cardinals, San Francisco 49ers, and Indianapolis Colts. However, in Week 4, the Philadelphia Eagles (0–3) upset the Rams, 34–20. The Rams would then win four of their next five, including a 20–17 win over the Bears in a rematch of the NFC Championship Game. The Rams would then close out the season with losses in four of their final seven games to end the year 10–6, good enough for second place in the NFC West behind the 49ers (10–5–1). In the playoffs, the Rams lost to the Washington Redskins, 19–7, in the NFC Wild Card Game to end the season with an overall record of 10–7.

Bud Moore (American football)

Robert W. "Bud" Moore (born October 16, 1939) is a former American football player and coach. He served as the head coach at the University of Kansas from 1975 to 1978, compiling a record of 18–26–1. In his first season in 1975, Moore was named Big Eight Coach of the Year and was runner up to Woody Hayes of Ohio State as the Football Writers Association of America National Coach of the Year. Moore led his team to a 23–3 upset over eventual national champion Oklahoma, breaking the Sooners' 37-game unbeaten streak and handing coach Barry Switzer his first loss.

The Jayhawks switched to the Wishbone formation when Moore came to Lawrence. Kansas' wishbone was piloted by quarterback Nolan Cromwell, who was named 1975 Big Eight Offensive Player of the Year and later went on to an 11-year Pro Bowl career as a defensive back with the Los Angeles Rams.

A native of Birmingham, Alabama and a graduate of the University of Alabama, Moore played football and coached for the Crimson Tide under Bear Bryant, serving as Bryant's first offensive coordinator in 1974. He also was an assistant under Charlie Bradshaw at the University of Kentucky, Gene Stallings at Texas A&M University, and Bill Dooley at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He received the Paul W. Bryant Alumni-Athlete Award in 1995. The award is given to a former University of Alabama athlete in recognition of character, contribution to society, professional achievement, and service to fellow man. Moore is a member of the University of Kansas Athletics Hall of Fame, and will be inducted into the Alabama Sports Hall of Fame on April 27, 2019.

After retiring from coaching, Moore entered private business. In 1994, he was honored on National Philanthropy Day by the West Florida chapter of the Association of Fundraising Professionals. He has been active in bird dog field trials and showing Tennessee Walking Horses, having raised and owned multiple national champions in both venues.

Football Digest

Football Digest was a sports magazine for fans interested in professional American football, with in-depth coverage of the National Football League (NFL). The magazine modeled the Reader's Digest idea, to bring the best in football journalism from newspapers and magazines that the fans would have otherwise not had an opportunity to read.

The final issue was published in November 2005.

It also had its own independent All-Rookie team which began in 1971 and its own All-pro team which began in the 1980s. The All-Pro team was chosen by the editorial staff which gave them the freedom to choose otherwise less-publicized players on the second-team selections. By interviewing coaches and players the editors felt they got the inside "scoop" on who the "sleepers" were for an All-Pro Team.

Kansas Sports Hall of Fame

The Kansas Sports Hall of Fame is a museum located in Wichita, Kansas, dedicated to preserving the history of sports in the state of Kansas. The museum provides exhibits, archives, facilities, services, and activities to honor those individuals and teams whose achievements in sports brought distinction to themselves, to their communities and to the entire state of Kansas.

Los Angeles Rams awards

This page details awards won by the Los Angeles Rams American football team. The Rams were formerly based in St. Louis (1995–2015) and Cleveland (1936–1942, 1944–1945), as well as Los Angeles (1946–1994, 2016–present).

Nolan

Nolan is both a surname and a given name, of Irish origin from Ó Nualláin, Notable people with the name include:

Surname:

Adam Nolan, Irish Boxer

Albert Nolan (born 1934), South African Roman Catholic theologian

Anna Nolan (born 1970), Irish television presenter

Anthony Nolan (1972–1979), for whom the Anthony Nolan UK charity was formed

Barry Nolan, American television presenter

Bernadette Nolan (1960–2013), Irish entertainer and actress

Bob Nolan (1908–1980), Canadian singer-songwriter and actor

Brandon Nolan (born 1983), Canadian ice hockey player

Brian Nolan (1932–2006), Canadian journalist and author

Catherine Nolan, American politician

Christopher Nolan (born 1970), film director

Christopher Nolan (author) (born 1965), Irish poet

Clive Nolan, British musician and producer

Coleen Nolan (born 1965), English television presenter

Daire Nolan (born 1968), Irish professional dancer and choreographer

David Nolan (American author) (born 1946), American non-fiction writer

David Nolan (Libertarian Party), American politician, founder of the Libertarian Party

David Nolan (swimmer), American swimmer

Deanna Nolan (born 1979), American basketball player

Dennis E. Nolan (1872–1956), U.S. Army general

Dick Nolan (football) (born 1932), American football player & coach

Dick Nolan (musician) (1939–2005), Canadian musician

Eddie Nolan (born 1988), Irish footballer

Edward Nolan (actor) (1888–1943), American silent film actor

Edward Nolan (bishop) (1793-1837), Irish Roman Catholic bishop

Edward Sylvester "The Only" Nolan (1857–1913), Canadian baseball player

Elaine Nolan (born 1981), Irish cricketer

Faith Nolan (born 1957), Canadian musician and social activist

Francis Nolan, British phonetician

Frederick Nolan (born 1931), British editor and writer

Gary Nolan (baseball player) (born 1948), American baseball player

Gary Nolan (radio host) (born 1954), American politician and radio host

Graham Nolan, comic book artist

Henry Grattan Nolan (1893–1957), Canadian lawyer

Isabel Nolan, Irish artist

James Thomas Nolan (1926-2018), American actor known professionally as James Greene

Jeanette Nolan (1911–1998), American actress

Jerry Nolan (1946–1992), American drummer

Joe Nolan (born 1951), American baseball player

John Nolan (musician) (born 1978), American singer and musician

John Gavin Nolan, American Roman Catholic bishop

John Philip Nolan (1838–1912), Irish landowner and politician

Jonathan Nolan (born 1976), British screenwriter

Jordan Nolan (ice hockey) (born 1989), Canadian professional ice hockey player

Joseph A. Nolan, Philippine–American War Medal of Honor recipient

Joseph R. Nolan, American jurist

Joseph Nolan Irish politician

Kathleen Nolan (born 1933), American actress.

Keith W. Nolan (May 7, 1964 – February 19, 2009) American military historian of the Vietnam War and author of Irish and Swedish descent.

Kevin Nolan (born 1982), English footballer of Irish and Dutch descent

Leo Nolan (born 1972), American boxer

Lloyd Nolan (1902–1985), American actor

Louis Edward Nolan (1818–1854), Canadian-British soldier

M. J. Nolan (born 1951), Irish politician

Mae Nolan (1886–1973), American politician

Martin Nolan, American journalist

Mary Nolan (1905–1948), American actress

Melanie Nolan (born 1960), historian and university academic from New Zealand

Michael N. Nolan, Irish-American politician

Michael Nolan, Baron Nolan, British judge

Mike Nolan (born 1954), Irish singer

Mike Nolan (born 1959), American football player & coach

Mike Nolan, principal of Middle Park State School

Monica Nolan (1913–1995), American tennis player

Nicholas M. Nolan (1835–1883) US Soldier during the American Civil War & Indian Wars

Norma Nolan (born c. 1943), Argentinian beauty queen

Owen Nolan (born 1972), Canadian ice hockey player

Pat Nolan, Canadian hockey player

Pat Nolan (born 1950), American lawyer, politician & activist

Patrick Nolan (1881–1941), Canadian politician

Philip Nolan (1771–1801), Irish-American confidence trickster

Rick Nolan (born 1943), American politician

Sam Nolan (born 1930), Irish trade unionist and political activist

Seán Nolan, Irish Sinn Féin politician

Sidney Nolan (1917–1992), Australian painter

Stephen Nolan (born 1973), Northern Irish radio and television presenter

Ted Nolan (born 1958), Canadian ice hockey player and coach

Tom Nolan (1921–1992), Irish politician

William F. Nolan (born 1928), American novelist

William I. Nolan (1874–1943), American politicianGiven name:

Nolan Arenado (born 1991), American baseball player

Nolan Bushnell (born 1943), American engineer and entrepreneur who founded Atari, Inc and the Chuck E. Cheese's Pizza-Time Theaters

Nolan Carroll (born 1987), National Football League (NFL) player

Nolan Cromwell (born 1955), football coach and former NFL player

Nolan Jones (born 1998), American baseball player

Nolan Miller (born 1935), American fashion designer

Nolan Miller (1907–2006), American author

Nolan North (born 1970), American voice actor

Nolan Reimold (born 1983), Major League Baseball player

Nolan Richardson (born 1941), American basketball coach

Nolan Roux (born 1988), French footballer

Nolan Ryan (born 1947), Hall of Fame Major League Baseball pitcher

Nolan Gerard Funk (born 28 July 1986), Canadian actor, singer, model and dancer

Nolan Smith (born 1988), American basketball player

Nolan Gould (born October 28, 1998), American actorFictional characters:

Nolan, supporting character in Season 6B of Teen Wolf

Bruce Nolan, from the film Bruce Almighty

Philip Nolan, main character of the short story "The Man Without a Country"

Nolan Heinberg, the secret identity of the fictional character Omni-Man

Nolan Walsh, from the film Racing Stripes

Lynsey Nolan, character in UK TV series Hollyoaks

Mike Nolan, main character from The Mike Nolan Show on Comedy Central Australia

The Nolan family from the novel A Tree Grows in Brooklyn

Nolan Sorrento, antagonist in the novel Ready Player One by Ernest Cline

Nolan, a Frontiner Brains from Pokemon Emerald

Norwood Vann

Norwood Vann (born February 18, 1962 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is a former American football player who played five NFL seasons with the Los Angeles Rams and Los Angeles Raiders in the early 1980s.

UPI NFC Player of the Year

From 1970 to 1996, United Press International (UPI) awarded the NFC Player of the Year award to players from the National Football League's National Football Conference (NFC).

First-team Offense
First-team Defense
First-team Special Teams
Second-team Offense
Second-team Defense
Second-team Special Teams

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