Night Gallery

Night Gallery is an American anthology series that aired on NBC from 1969 to 1973, featuring stories of horror and the macabre. Rod Serling, who had gained fame from an earlier series, The Twilight Zone, served both as the on-air host of Night Gallery and as a major contributor of scripts, although he did not have the same control of content and tone as he had on The Twilight Zone.[3][2] Serling viewed Night Gallery as a logical extension of The Twilight Zone, but while both series shared an interest in thought-provoking dark fantasy, more of Zone's offerings were science fiction while Night Gallery focused on horrors of the supernatural.[1]

Night Gallery
Also known asRod Serling's Night Gallery
Genre
Created byRod Serling
Presented byRod Serling
Theme music composerBilly Goldenberg (pilot)
Gil Mellé (seasons 1 & 2)
Eddie Sauter (season 3)
Composer(s)Robert Bain
Paul Glass
John Lewis
Gil Mellé
Oliver Nelson
Robert Prince
Eddie Sauter
Country of originUnited States
Original language(s)English
No. of seasons3
No. of episodes43 (+ pilot) (list of episodes)
Production
Producer(s)Jack Laird
William Sackheim
Camera setupSingle-camera
Running time50 minutes (seasons 1 & 2)
25 minutes (season 3)
Production company(s)Universal Television
DistributorMCA TV
(1973-1974)
NBCUniversal Television Distribution
Release
Original networkNBC
Audio formatMonaural
Original releaseNovember 8, 1969 (pilot) December 16, 1970 –
May 27, 1973

Format

Joan Crawford Night Gallery 1969
Joan Crawford in the telefilm that began the series, 1969.

Serling appeared in an art gallery setting as the curator and introduced the macabre tales that made up each episode by unveiling paintings (by artists Thomas J. Wright and Jaroslav "Jerry" Gebr) that depicted the stories. His intro usually was, “Good evening, and welcome to a private showing of three paintings, displayed here for the first time. Each is a collector’s item in its own way—not because of any special artistic quality, but because each captures on a canvas, suspended in time and space, a frozen moment of a nightmare.” Night Gallery regularly presented adaptations of classic fantasy tales by authors such as H. P. Lovecraft, as well as original works, many of which were by Serling himself. During its second season, the series also began using original comedic blackout sketches between the longer story segments in some episodes.[2] These types of segments were much less frequent in the third and final season.

The series was introduced with a pilot TV movie that aired on November 8, 1969, and featured the directorial debut of Steven Spielberg, as well as one of the last acting performances by Joan Crawford.

Night Gallery was initially part of a rotating anthology or wheel series called Four in One. This 1970–1971 television series rotated four separate shows, including McCloud, SFX (San Francisco International Airport) and The Psychiatrist. Two of these, Night Gallery and McCloud, were renewed for the 1971–1972 season, with McCloud becoming the most popular and longest running of the four.

Music

The show featured various composers. The original pilot theme and background music was composed by Billy Goldenberg. The theme for the first two seasons, composed by Gil Mellé, is noted for being one of the first television openings to use electronic instruments. For the third season, Mellé's theme was replaced with a more frantic orchestral piece by Eddie Sauter.[4] Currently, no music from the show has ever been commercially released.

Production

Serling wrote many of the teleplays, including "Camera Obscura" (based on a short story by Basil Copper), "The Caterpillar" (based on a short story by Oscar Cook), "Class of '99", "Cool Air" (based on a short story by H. P. Lovecraft), "The Doll", "Green Fingers", "Lindemann's Catch", and "The Messiah on Mott Street" (heavily influenced by Bernard Malamud's "Angel Levine"). Non-Serling efforts include "The Dead Man", "I'll Never Leave You—Ever", "Pickman's Model" (based on a short story by H. P. Lovecraft), "A Question of Fear", "Silent Snow, Secret Snow", and "The Sins of the Fathers".

Robert Bloch wrote two teleplays for the show. "Logoda's Heads" was based on the story by August Derleth. "Last Rites for a Dead Druid" was originally an adaptation by Bloch of the H. P. Lovecraft/Hazel Heald collaboration Out of the Aeons; however, Bloch's script was not used - the episode was rewritten and retitled, with "Last Rites for a Dead Druid" bearing no resemblance to "Out of the Aeons". [5]

Award nominations

Night Gallery was nominated for an Emmy Award for its first-season episode "They're Tearing Down Tim Riley's Bar" as the Outstanding Single Program on U.S. television in 1971. In 1972, the series received another nomination (Outstanding Achievement in Makeup) for the second-season episode "Pickman's Model." Serling himself received an Edgar Allan Poe Award for writing the pilot.

Syndication

In order to increase the number of episodes that were available for syndication, the 60-minute episodes were re-edited for a 30-minute time slot, with many segments severely cut, and others extended by inserting "new" scenes of recycled, previously discarded, or stock footage to fill up the time. In their book Rod Serling's Night Gallery: An After-Hours Tour, authors Scott Skelton and Jim Benson identify 39 of the 98 individual segments that were produced for Night Gallery as being "severely altered" in syndication. Twenty-five episodes of an unrelated, short-lived supernatural series from 1972, The Sixth Sense, were also incorporated into the syndicated version of the series, with Serling providing newly filmed introductions to those episodes. As The Sixth Sense was originally a one-hour show, these episodes were all severely edited to fit into the half-hour timeslot.

The original, uncut and un-edited hour-long version of the series (and without the additional Sixth Sense episodes) has been shown on STARZ!’s Encore Mystery premium movie cable network. The show has aired in the 30-minute format in some markets through the Retro Television Network in the past.

MeTV currently has broadcast rights for Night Gallery and airs the show in its edited, 30-minute format, including the edited The Sixth Sense episodes.

From May 21 to May 23, 2016, Decades aired a marathon of the series.[6]

On December 6, 2018, Syfy announced that it plans to revive the Night Gallery series.

Home media

Universal Studios Home Entertainment has released all 3 seasons on DVD in Region 1 as well as the first season on DVD in the UK.

On September 12, 2017, Universal released Night Gallery: The Complete Series on DVD in Region 1.[7]

DVD name Episodes Release date Additional information
The Complete First Season 17 August 24, 2004 Includes pilot film
Season 2 61 November 11, 2008
  • Podcast commentaries, featuring Jim Benson and Scott Skelton
  • Audio commentaries, with Guillermo del Toro
  • Revisiting the Gallery: A Look Back
  • Art Gallery: The Paintings in "Rod Serling's Night Gallery"
  • NBC TV Promos
Season 3 20 April 10, 2012
The Complete Series 98 September 12, 2017

See also

Similar series

References

  1. ^ a b "Episode Guide". nightgallery.net. Archived from the original on 10 September 2017. Retrieved 9 May 2018.
  2. ^ a b c Skelton, Scott; Benson, Jim (1999). Rod Serling's Night Gallery: An After-Hours Tour. Syracuse University Press. ISBN 978-0-8156-2782-1.
  3. ^ "Night Gallery". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 2013-03-03.
  4. ^ "Music in the Gallery". nightgallery.net. Archived from the original on 10 February 2018. Retrieved 9 May 2018.
  5. ^ Randall Larson. The Complete Robert Bloch: An Illustrated, Comprehensive Bibliography. Fandom Unlimited, 19856, p. 76
  6. ^ "Decades TV Network". Archived from the original on 21 May 2016. Retrieved 21 May 2016.
  7. ^ "Night Gallery DVD news: Announcement for The Complete Series - TVShowsOnDVD.com". www.tvshowsondvd.com. Archived from the original on 2 November 2017. Retrieved 9 May 2018.

External links

Billy Goldenberg

William Leon Goldenberg (born February 10, 1936, Brooklyn) is an American composer and songwriter, best known for his work on television and film.Among his most noteworthy were his collaborations with Steven Spielberg on his telefilms (in particular, Night Gallery in 1969, and Duel in 1971) and his seven-episode contribution toward the NBC Mystery Movie detective series Columbo. He composed the themes for several popular television programs, including Kojak, Alias Smith and Jones, Banacek, Rhoda and Our House. He composed the scores to countless films and TV movies including Fear No Evil (1969), Ritual of Evil (1970), The Grasshopper (1970), Red Sky at Morning (1971), Up the Sandbox (1972), The Last of Sheila (1973), Don't Be Afraid of the Dark (1973), Busting (1974), Reflections of Murder (1974), The Legend of Lizzie Borden (1975), James Dean (1976), One of My Wives Is Missing (1976), The Lindbergh Kidnapping Case (1976), Helter Skelter (1976), The Domino Principle (1977), Mary Jane Harper Cried Last Night (1977), The Cracker Factory (1979), Scavenger Hunt (1979), This House Possessed (1981), The Best Little Girl in the World (1981), Reuben, Reuben (1983), Kane & Abel (1985), Good to Go (1986), 18 Again! (1988), Around the World in 80 Days (1989) and Chernobyl: The Final Warning (1991).

Goldenberg served as Musical Director for Elvis Presley's Comeback Special, The Ann-Margret Show, An Evening with Diana Ross and others. He received an Emmy Award in 1975 for the CBS miniseries Benjamin Franklin and again in 1978 for the NBC miniseries King. He has received 22 Emmy nominations in total.Goldenberg served as musical accompanist for An Evening with Elaine May and Mike Nichols. He was also the composer of the Michael Bennett-directed Broadway musical Ballroom, based on the television special Queen of the Stardust Ballroom, which he also composed.

Buckethead discography

Buckethead is an American musician, predominantly a guitarist. The following is a discography of works by Buckethead, which currently consists of 306 studio albums (including 275 in the Pike Series), 1 live album, 4 special releases, 1 extended play, 5 demo tapes, 3 solo DVD video releases, 2 DVD video releases with Cornbugs, 3 music videos, 3 unreleased albums, 3 solo videography releases, and 16 videography releases with other artists.

Since 1994, Buckethead has released 6 studio efforts under the anagram of Death Cube K. He has released 74 works with other bands and artists (including his work as Death Cube K). The total number of studio albums, special releases, extended plays, demo tapes, and works with other bands and projects is 379. His guest appearances total 97. His videography releases total 19. In total, Buckethead has been involved with 476 different album projects (as solo or with other bands). As of his 306th solo studio album and his 275th album in the Pikes series, Dreamthread, his total solo studio album running time is approximately 162 hours, 55 minutes.

Daniel Haller

Daniel Haller (born September 14, 1926 in Glendale, California) is an American film and television director, production designer, and art director. Haller studied at the renowned Chouinard Art Institute in Los Angeles.

In 1953, Haller started as an art director in television, then quickly graduated to low budget feature films. Among many other credits, Haller designed the deceptively opulent sets for nearly all of Roger Corman's critically acclaimed Edgar Allan Poe film series, including House of Usher (1960) and The Pit and the Pendulum (1961).

Haller directed his first film, Die, Monster, Die!, in 1965 for American International Pictures. Based on H. P. Lovecraft's short story "The Colour Out of Space", it was very similar in plot and atmosphere to Corman's Poe films. After directing two motorcycle pictures (Devil's Angels (1967) and The Wild Racers (1968)), Haller filmed another Lovecraft adaptation, The Dunwich Horror (1970).

From 1972, all of Haller's subsequent work has been in television, including directing episodes of Night Gallery, Kojak, Sara, Battlestar Galactica, Buck Rogers in the 25th Century and Knight Rider. Today he lives with his family on a horse ranch in the San Fernando Valley in California.

Darkroom (TV series)

Darkroom is an American television thriller anthology series produced by Universal Television which aired on ABC from November 27, 1981 to January 15, 1982. As an anthology horror/thriller series it was similar in style to Rod Serling's Night Gallery. Each 60-minute episode featured two or more stories of varying length with a new story and a new cast, but each of the episode wraparound segments was hosted by James Coburn. Among the performers who appeared on the series were Esther Rolle, Helen Hunt, Claude Akins, Richard Anderson, Lawrence Hilton-Jacobs, Carole Cook, David Carradine, Billy Crystal, Pat Buttram, Brian Dennehy, Lawrence Pressman, Dub Taylor, Rue McClanahan, Lloyd Bochner, Ronny Cox, R. G. Armstrong, and June Lockhart.

Fritz Weaver

Fritz William Weaver (January 19, 1926 − November 26, 2016) was an American actor in television, stage, and motion pictures, perhaps best known for his role as Dr. Josef Weiss in the 1978 epic television drama, Holocaust. In cinema, he is best recognized from his debut film Fail Safe (1964), as well as Marathon Man (1976), Creepshow (1982) and The Thomas Crown Affair (1999). Among many television roles, he performed in two seminal projects: the movie The Legend of Lizzie Borden (1975) and the mini-series Holocaust (1978), for which Weaver was nominated for a Primetime Emmy Award. He was further known for his work in science fiction and fantasy, especially in television series and movies like The Twilight Zone, 'Way Out, Night Gallery, The X-Files, The Martian Chronicles and Demon Seed, and also narrated educational TV programs.

High Contrast

Lincoln Barrett, better known by the stage name High Contrast (born 18 September 1979), is a Welsh electronic music producer DJ and record producer.

Jack Laird

Jack Laird (May 8, 1923 – December 3, 1991) was an American screenwriter, producer, director, and actor. He received three Primetime Emmy Award nominations for his works in Ben Casey, Night Gallery, and Kojak.

Laird entered the entertainment industry at a young age. One of his first appearances as a child actor was in an unbilled bit part in the 1934 film The Circus Clown. He continued to appear in unbilled bits into his late twenties, but eventually moved into writing and producing.One of Laird's favorite actors was Leslie Nielsen with whom he made several made-for-TV movies, including 1964's See How They Run, the first feature in that genre, Code Name: Heraclitus, Dark Intruder, The Return of Charlie Chan and numerous TV episodes. Nielsen also starred in a series produced by Laird was evidently an admirer of horror writer H.P. Lovecraft. He based at least two episodes of Night Gallery on Lovecraft's work - "Pickman's Model" (based directly on the Lovecraft story of the same title Pickman's Model) and "Professor Peabody's Last Lecture". The dialogue of the 1965 horror movie Dark Intruder, produced by Laird, includes some references to alien beings invented by Lovecraft, tying the film to Lovecraft's Cthulhu Mythos. In an early scene where Brett Kingsford meets with the police commissioner, opines that "gods older than the human race...deities like Dagon and Azathoth still have worshippers." He was also an avid film collector and jazz fan.Laird died of cancer in Los Angeles at the age of 68. His final resting place in Hollywood Forever Cemetery is in the "Garden of Legends" (formerly Section 8), Lot 266. His grave is next to the cenotaph of actress Jayne Mansfield.

Jeannot Szwarc

Jeannot Szwarc (born November 21, 1937) is a director of film and television, known for such films as Jaws 2, Somewhere in Time, Supergirl and Santa Claus: The Movie. He has also produced and written for TV.

Joanna Pettet

Joanna Pettet (born Joanna Jane Salmon, 16 November 1942) is a retired English actress.

Kathryn M. Drennan

Kathryn M. Drennan is an American writer, having worked for Carl Sagan on the mini-series Cosmos: A Personal Voyage in the early 1980s and for Michael Piller, producer at the time for Star Trek: The Next Generation, in the early 1990s. She also contributed articles to several magazines, including Starlog and Twilight Zone Magazine. She was married to J. Michael Straczynski, creator of Babylon 5, and wrote articles about Rod Serling's Night Gallery for Twilight Zone Magazine together with him. She wrote one script during Babylon 5's first season, "By Any Means Necessary" as well as the prose Babylon 5 novel, To Dream in the City of Sorrows. She also wrote scripts for two other shows Straczynski worked on, She-Ra: Princess of Power and The Real Ghostbusters.

Night Gallery (film)

Night Gallery is a 1969 American made-for-television anthology supernatural horror film starring Joan Crawford, Roddy McDowall and Richard Kiley. Directed by Boris Sagal, Steven Spielberg and Barry Shear, the film consists of three supernatural tales that served as the pilot for the anthology series of the same name, written and hosted by Rod Serling. The film originally premiered on NBC on November 8, 1969.Rod Serling appears in a dark art gallery setting and introduces a trilogy of supernatural tales by unveiling paintings that depicts each segment. The three canvases produced for the pilot were painted by Jaroslav "Jerry" Gebr (who was head of the Scenic Arts Department at Universal Studios). The original pilot theme was composed by William Goldenberg (who also did the pilot's background music).

Phyllis Diller

Phyllis Ada Diller (née Driver, born July 17, 1917 – August 20, 2012) was an American actress and stand-up comedienne, best known for her eccentric stage persona, her self-deprecating humor, her wild hair and clothes, and her exaggerated, cackling laugh.

Diller was one of the first female comics to become a household name in the U.S. She paved the way for Joan Rivers, Roseanne Barr, and Ellen DeGeneres, among others, who credit her influence. She had a large gay following and is considered a gay icon. She was also one of the first celebrities to openly champion plastic surgery, for which she was recognized by the industry.Diller worked in more than 40 films, beginning with 1961's Splendor in the Grass. She appeared in many television series, often in cameos, but also including her own short-lived sitcom and variety show. Some of her credits are Night Gallery, The Muppet Show, The Love Boat, Cybill, and Boston Legal, plus 11 seasons of The Bold and the Beautiful. Her voice-acting roles included the monster's wife in Mad Monster Party, the Queen in A Bug's Life, Granny Neutron in The Adventures of Jimmy Neutron: Boy Genius, and Thelma Griffin in Family Guy.

Pickman's Model

"Pickman's Model" is a short story by H. P. Lovecraft, written in September 1926 and first published in the October 1927 issue of Weird Tales. It was adapted for television in a 1971 episode of the Night Gallery anthology series, starring Bradford Dillman.

Rod Serling

Rodman Edward Serling (December 25, 1924 – June 28, 1975) was an American screenwriter, playwright, television producer, and narrator known for his live television dramas of the 1950s and his science-fiction anthology TV series, The Twilight Zone. Serling was active in politics, both on and off the screen, and helped form television industry standards. He was known as the "angry young man" of Hollywood, clashing with television executives and sponsors over a wide range of issues including censorship, racism, and war.

San Francisco International Airport (TV series)

San Francisco International Airport is a television drama aired in the United States by NBC as a part of its 1970–71 wheel series Four in One.

The series starred Lloyd Bridges as Jim Conrad, the manager of the gigantic San Francisco International Airport, which at the time the series aired was said to be handling over 15,000,000 passengers annually and employing over 35,000 persons. Bob Hatten (Clu Gulager) was his chief of security, an important role at a time when security was beginning to emerge as a real-life major issue in air transport. June (Barbara Werle) was Conrad's secretary. Airport situations drawn from real life were addressed, such as protesting demonstrators, mechanical malfunctions, and similar problems.

San Francisco International Airport was the second program in the Four in One rotation, following McCloud. The six episodes were first shown in order from late October until early December, 1970, and were then replaced in the Wednesday night 10 PM Eastern time slot by Night Gallery. Once Night Gallery and The Psychiatrist had completed their first runs, episodes of all four series were rerun interspersed with each other. Night Gallery was picked up for the next season as a stand-alone series and McCloud was renewed as an element in a new wheel series, NBC Mystery Movie, but San Francisco International Airport and The Psychiatrist were cancelled with no more episodes ordered beyond the initial six.

The pilot for this series, also called San Francisco International Airport or simply San Francisco International, had been aired in the spring as a TV movie before the series premiered. It was largely similar, but starred Pernell Roberts as Conrad rather than Bridges. Despite the fact that critical response was underwhelming, the six episodes that comprised the series were ordered—with the stipulation that Roberts be replaced in the starring role by Bridges. This pilot was the subject of a sixth-season episode of Mystery Science Theater 3000 in 1994.

Sondra Locke

Sandra Louise Anderson (née Smith; May 28, 1944 – November 3, 2018), professionally known as Sondra Locke, was an American actress and director. She made her film debut in 1968 in The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter, for which she was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress. Locke went on to star in such films as Willard, The Outlaw Josey Wales, The Gauntlet, Every Which Way But Loose, Bronco Billy, Any Which Way You Can and Sudden Impact. On each film (with the exception of the former), she had worked with Clint Eastwood, who was her companion for 13 years. Locke's autobiography, The Good, the Bad, and the Very Ugly – A Hollywood Journey, was published in 1997.

The Psychiatrist (TV series)

The Psychiatrist is an American television series about a young psychiatrist with unorthodox methods of helping his patients. Roy Thinnes played the title role of Dr. James Whitman. Luther Adler co-starred as Dr. Bernard Altman, the older psychiatrist with whom Whitman worked. Two episodes of the short-lived series, "The Private World of Martin Dalton" and "Par for the Course," were directed by Steven Spielberg. The regular hour-long series ran from February 3, 1971, to March 10 of the same year.

The pilot for the series, a made-for-TV movie called The Psychiatrist: God Bless the Children, aired on December 14, 1970. Actor Pete Duel was at the center of this 90 minute drama, as Casey Poe, a former drug addict who, after finishing a two-year prison sentence, must battle his own personal demons, as well as the prejudices of others, in order to reenter society. Dr. Whitman is the psychiatrist who must break through Poe's resistance in order to help him form a new life for himself. Duel received much praise for his performance and reprised his role in the first regular episode of the series, "In Death's Other Kingdom."

The Psychiatrist was an element in the wheel series Four in One, which NBC aired in the 10 PM Eastern time slot during its 1970-71 series. The Psychiatrist was the final series of the four to air, following the first-run conclusions of the other three components, McCloud, Night Gallery, and San Francisco International Airport. After all four series had completed their initial six-episode runs, reruns of the four were interspersed with each other until the end of the summer. Of the four elements, McCloud was picked up as one element of a new wheel-format series, the NBC Mystery Movie, and Night Gallery was picked up as a stand-alone series, while San Francisco International Airport and The Psychiatrist were cancelled with no further episodes ordered beyond the original six.

Thomas J. Wright

Thomas J. Wright is an American television director, film director, artist, and set designer. Wright has directed episodes of Smallville, One Tree Hill, Firefly, and many other programs. He also worked extensively on Chris Carter's Millennium, on which he was a producer as well as directing 26 of the show's 67 episodes. He also directed the 1989 Hulk Hogan film No Holds Barred. He also was the artist who created the paintings used in the television horror anthology series Night Gallery.

Treehouse of Horror IV

"Treehouse of Horror IV" is the fifth episode of The Simpsons' fifth season and the fourth episode in the Treehouse of Horror series of Halloween specials. It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on October 28, 1993, and features three short stories called "The Devil and Homer Simpson", "Terror at ​5 1⁄2 Feet", and "Bart Simpson's Dracula". The episode was directed by David Silverman and co-written by Conan O'Brien, Bill Oakley, Josh Weinstein, Greg Daniels, Dan McGrath, and Bill Canterbury.

In "The Devil and Homer Simpson", Homer Simpson announces he would sell his soul for a doughnut, and the Devil appears to make a deal with Homer. Homer tries to outsmart the Devil by not finishing the doughnut but eventually eats it and is sent to Hell. A trial is held between Homer and the Devil to determine the rightful owner of Homer's soul. In "Terror at ​5 1⁄2 Feet", while riding the bus to school, Bart Simpson thinks he sees a gremlin disassembling the bus piece by piece. Nobody sees it except for Bart, so he tries to remove it by himself. In "Bart Simpson's Dracula", Mr. Burns is a vampire and Bart falls victim to his bite. Lisa and the rest of the family go to Burns' castle to kill Burns so Bart can return to normal.

As with the rest of the Halloween specials, the episode is considered non-canon and falls outside the show's regular continuity. The episode makes cultural references to television series such as The Twilight Zone, Night Gallery, and Peanuts. References are also made to films such as Bram Stoker's Dracula and The Lost Boys. Since airing, the episode has received mostly positive reviews from television critics. It acquired a Nielsen rating of 14.5, and was the highest-rated show on the Fox network the week it aired.

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