Nigeria women's national football team

The Nigeria national women's football team, nicknamed the Super Falcons (parallel to the men's Super Eagles epithet), is the national team of Nigeria and is controlled by the Nigeria Football Federation.

Nigeria
Nickname(s)Super Falcons
AssociationNigeria Football Federation
ConfederationCAF (Africa)
Sub-confederationWAFU (West Africa)
Head coachThomas Dennerby[1]
CaptainDesire Oparanozie
Most capsMaureen Mmadu (101)[2]
Top scorerPerpetua Nkwocha (80)[3]
FIFA codeNGA
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 36 Increase 2 (12 July 2019)[4]
Highest23 (July 2003)
Lowest39 (December 2018)
First international
 Nigeria 5–1 Ghana 
( Nigeria; 16 February 1991)
Biggest win
 Nigeria 15–0 Niger 
(Côte d'Ivoire; 11 May 2019)
Biggest defeat
 Norway 8–0 Nigeria 
(Tingvalla IP, Sweden; 6 June 1995)
 Germany 8–0 Nigeria 
(Leverkusen, Germany; 25 November 2010)
 France 8–0 Nigeria 
(Le Mans, France; 6 April 2018)
World Cup
Appearances8 (first in 1991)
Best resultQuarterfinals (1999)
Football at the Summer Olympics
Appearances3 (first in 2000)
Best resultQuarterfinals (2004)
African Women's Championship
Appearances13 (first in 1991)
Best resultWinners (1991, 1995, 1998, 2000, 2002, 2004, 2006, 2010, 2014, 2016, 2018 (11))
WAFU Zone B Women's Cup
Appearances2 (first in 2018)
Best resultChampions (2019)

History

They won the first seven African championships and through their first twenty years lost only five games to African competition: 12 December 2002 to Ghana in Warri, 3 June 2007 at Algeria, 12 August 2007 to Ghana in an Olympic qualifier, 25 November 2008 at Equatorial Guinea in the semis of the 2008 Women's African Football Championship and May 2011 at Ghana in an All Africa Games qualification match.

The Super Falcons have been unable to dominate beyond Africa in such arenas as the FIFA Women's World Cup or the Olympic Games. The team has been to every World Cup since 1991, but managed just once to finish in the top eight. In 2003, the Super Falcons turned out to be the biggest disappointment of the first round, failing to score a single goal and losing all three Group A matches. They did little better in 2007, drawing only one of their Group B matches. However, they faced the group of death in both 2003 and 2007, grouped both times with rising Asian power North Korea, traditional European power Sweden, and a historic women's superpower in the USA.

Nigeria hosted the African women’s championship finals for the third time in 2006, replacing Gabon, which was initially granted the right to host but later pulled out citing financial difficulties, and won it for the seventh time in a row. Nigeria’s Super Falcons and Ghana’s Black Queens represented Africa in China for the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup.

After training with my team mates in the National Camp Super Falcon in Abuja Nigeria
Super Falcons after a training session

The "Falconets" are the country’s junior team (U-20), which performed creditably in the 2006 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup held in Russia when they beat Finland 8–0 before they were sent packing by Brazil in the Quarter-finals. They were the runner-up to Germany at the 2010 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup. Nigeria also played in the 2014 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup held in Canada and lost to Germany in the finals 0–1, Asisat Oshoala got both the golden ball and golden boot.

The "Flamingoes" are the country’s cadet team (U-17), which qualified for the inaugural women's U-17 World Cup New Zealand 2008. Nigeria qualified for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup where they were placed in Group A with South Korea, Norway and hosts France.

Tournament record

World Cup

World Cup Finals
Year Result Position Pld W D L GF GA
China 1991 Group stage 10th 3 0 0 3 0 7
Sweden 1995 Group stage 11th 3 0 1 2 5 14
United States 1999 Quarter-finals 7th 4 2 0 2 8 12
United States 2003 Group stage 15th 3 0 0 3 0 11
China 2007 Group stage 13th 3 0 1 2 1 4
Germany 2011 Group stage 9th 3 1 0 2 1 2
Canada 2015 Group stage 21st 3 0 1 2 3 6
France 2019 Round of 16 4 1 0 3 2 7
Total 8/8 - 26 4 3 19 20 63

Olympics

Year Result Matches Wins Draws Losses GF GA
United States 1996 Did not qualify
Australia 2000 Group stage 3 0 0 3 3 9
Greece 2004 Quarter-finals 3 1 0 2 3 4
China 2008 Group stage 3 0 0 3 1 5
United Kingdom 2012 Did not qualify
Brazil 2016 Did not qualify
Japan 2020 To be determined
Total 3/6 9 1 0 8 7 18

Africa Women's Championship

CAF Women's Championship
Year Round Pld W D L GF GA
1991 Champions 6 6 0 0 20 2
1995 Champions 6 6 0 0 27 2
Nigeria 1998 Champions 5 5 0 0 28 0
South Africa 2000 Champions 5 4 1 0 19 2
Nigeria 2002 Champions 5 4 0 1 15 2
South Africa 2004 Champions 5 4 1 0 18 2
Nigeria 2006 Champions 5 5 0 0 18 2
Equatorial Guinea 2008 Third place 5 1 3 1 3 3
South Africa 2010 Champions 5 5 0 0 19 4
Equatorial Guinea 2012 Fourth place 5 3 0 2 8 4
Namibia 2014 Champions 5 5 0 0 16 3
Cameroon 2016 Champions 5 4 1 0 13 1
Ghana 2018 Champions 5 2 2 1 10 1
Total 11 Titles 67 54 8 5 214 28

All African Games

Football at the African Games
Year Round Pld W D L GF GA
Nigeria 2003 Champions 5 5 0 0 17 1
Algeria 2007 Champions 4 3 1 0 14 2
Mozambique 2011 Did not qualify 0 0 0 0 0 0
Republic of the Congo 2015 Fourth place 5 2 0 3 11 7
Total 3/4 14 10 1 3 42 10

Team honours and achievements

Intercontinental

Continental

Sub-Continental

Other

Results and fixtures

2019

Players

Current squad

The following 23 players were named to the roster for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup.[5][6]

Head coach: Sweden Thomas Dennerby

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Club
1 GK Tochukwu Oluehi 2 May 1987 (age 32) Nigeria Rivers Angels
16 GK Chiamaka Nnadozie 8 December 2000 (age 18) Nigeria Rivers Angels
21 GK Alaba Jonathan 1 June 1992 (age 27) Nigeria Bayelsa Queens F.C.

3 DF Osinachi Ohale 21 December 1991 (age 27) Sweden Växjö DFF
4 DF Ngozi Ebere 5 August 1991 (age 27) Norway Arna-Bjørnar
5 DF Onome Ebi 8 May 1983 (age 36) China Henan Huishang
14 DF Faith Michael 28 February 1987 (age 32) Sweden Piteå IF
20 DF Chidinma Okeke 11 August 2000 (age 18) Nigeria FC Robo Queens

2 MF Amarachi Okoronkwo 12 December 1992 (age 26) Nigeria Nasarawa Amazons
6 MF Evelyn Nwabuoku 14 November 1985 (age 33) France Guingamp
10 MF Rita Chikwelu 6 March 1988 (age 31) Sweden Kristianstads DFF
11 MF Chinaza Uchendu 3 December 1997 (age 21) Portugal SC Braga
13 MF Ngozi Okobi-Okeoghene 14 December 1993 (age 25) Sweden Eskilstuna United
15 MF Rasheedat Ajibade 8 December 1999 (age 19) Norway Avaldsnes
18 MF Halimatu Ayinde 16 May 1995 (age 24) Sweden Eskistuna United
23 MF Ogonna Chukwudi 14 September 1988 (age 30) Sweden Djurgårdens IF

7 FW Anam Imo 30 November 2000 (age 18) Sweden FC Rosengård
8 FW Asisat Oshoala 9 October 1994 (age 24) Spain FC Barcelona
9 FW Desire Oparanozie (c) 17 December 1993 (age 25) France EA Guingamp
12 FW Uchenna Kanu 20 June 1997 (age 22) United States Southeastern Fire
17 FW Francisca Ordega 19 October 1993 (age 25) China Shanghai WFC (zh)
19 FW Chinwendu Ihezuo 30 April 1997 (age 22) China Henan Huishang
22 FW Alice Ogebe 30 March 1995 (age 24) Nigeria Rivers Angels

Recent call-ups

This list may be incomplete.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Christy Ohiaeriaku 13 December 1996 (age 22) - - Nigeria Confluence Queens 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup PRE
GK Onyinyechukwu Okeke Nigeria Edo Queens F.C. 2018 Africa Women Cup of Nations PRE

DF Josephine Chukwunonye 19 March 1992 (age 27) - - Sweden Kungsbacka DFF 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup PRE
DF Patricia George - - Unattached v.  Canada, 8 April 2019
DF Glory Ogbonna 25 December 1998 (age 20) Nigeria Ibom Angels 2019 Cyprus Women's Cup
DF Ugochi Emenayo 20 December 1997 (age 21) Nigeria Nasarawa Amazons 2019 Four Nations Tournament
DF Sarah Nnodim 25 December 1995 (age 23) Nigeria Nasarawa Amazons 2018 Africa Women Cup of Nations
DF Joy Jegede 16 December 1991 (age 27) Nigeria Bayelsa Queens F.C. 2018 Africa Women Cup of Nations PRE
DF Maureen Okpalla Nigeria Confluence Queens 2018 Africa Women Cup of Nations PRE
DF Mariam Ibrahim 12 December 1995 (age 23) Nigeria Nasarawa Amazons 2018 Africa Women Cup of Nations PRE
DF Joy Duru 23 December 1999 (age 19) Nigeria Nasarawa Amazons 2018 Africa Women Cup of Nations PRE
DF Juliet Iorliam Nigeria Nasarawa Amazons 2018 Africa Women Cup of Nations PRE

MF Cecilia Nku 26 October 1992 (age 26) - - Hungary Ferencváros Torna 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup PRE
MF Osarenoma Igbinovia 5 June 1996 (age 23) Nigeria Bayelsa Queens F.C. 2018 Africa Women Cup of Nations PRE
MF Christy Ucheibe 25 December 2000 (age 18) Nigeria Nasarawa Amazons 2018 Africa Women Cup of Nations PRE
MF Ogechi Ukwuoma 25 December 1996 (age 22) Nigeria Pelican Stars F.C. 2018 Africa Women Cup of Nations PRE
MF Peace Efih 5 August 2000 (age 18) Spain Sporting Huelva 2018 Africa Women Cup of Nations PRE
MF Bashirat Amoo 6 June 2002 (age 17) Nigeria Confluence Queens 2018 Africa Women Cup of Nations PRE
MF Goodness Onyebuchi Nigeria Sunshine Queens F.C. 2018 Africa Women Cup of Nations PRE
MF Nneka Julius Nigeria Edo Queens F.C. 2018 Africa Women Cup of Nations PRE
MF Patience Agbokade Nigeria Sunshine Queens F.C. 2018 Africa Women Cup of Nations PRE
MF Mary Anjor 20 June 2000 (age 19) Nigeria Osun Babes 2018 Africa Women Cup of Nations PRE
MF Charity Adule 7 November 1993 (age 25) Kazakhstan BIIK Kazygurt 2018 Africa Women Cup of Nations PRE

FW Ini-Abasi Umotong 15 May 1994 (age 25) - - England Brighton & Hove Albion 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup PRE
FW Courtney Dike 3 February 1994 (age 25) United States Oklahoma City FC v.  Canada, 8 April 2019
FW Toni Payne 22 April 1995 (age 24) Spain Sevilla v.  Canada, 8 April 2019
FW Joy Jerry Nigeria Bayelsa Queens F.C. 2018 Africa Women Cup of Nations PRE
FW Chioma Wogu 28 January 1999 (age 20) Nigeria Rivers Angels 2018 Africa Women Cup of Nations PRE
FW Orji Ebere 23 December 1992 (age 26) Sweden Mallbackens IF 2018 Africa Women Cup of Nations PRE
FW Esther Sunday 13 March 1992 (age 27) Turkey Ataşehir Belediyespor 2018 Africa Women Cup of Nations PRE
FW Uchechi Sunday 9 September 1994 (age 24) China Guangdong Meizhou Huijun 2018 Africa Women Cup of Nations PRE

References

  1. ^ "Swede Thomas Dennerby to coach Nigeria's women's team". BBC.com.
  2. ^ "FIFA Women's Century Club" (PDF). FIFA. 25 August 2009.
  3. ^ "AFRICAN LEGEND OF THE WEEK: PERPETUA NKWOCHA". Goal.com. 9 March 2017.
  4. ^ "The FIFA/Coca-Cola Women's World Ranking". FIFA. 12 July 2019. Retrieved 12 July 2019.
  5. ^ NFF  🇳🇬, The (24 May 2019). "And here's the 23 for France! #SoarSuperFalcons #FIFAWWC #DareToShinepic.twitter.com/qPCHoYj2x0". @thenff. Retrieved 29 May 2019.
  6. ^ https://tournament.fifadata.com/documents/FWWC/2019/pdf/FWWC_2019_SQUADLISTS.PDF

External links

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Inaugural Champions
African Women's Champions
1991 (First title)
1995 (Second title)
1998 (Third title)
2000 (Fourth title)
2002 (Fifth title)
2004 (Sixth title)
2006 (Seventh title)
Succeeded by
2008 Equatorial Guinea 
Preceded by
2008 Equatorial Guinea 
African Women's Champions
2010 (Eighth title)
Succeeded by
2012 Equatorial Guinea 
Preceded by
2012 Equatorial Guinea 
African Women's Champions
2014 (Ninth title)
2016 (Tenth title)
2018 (Eleventh title)
Succeeded by
Current Champions
Amarachi Okoronkwo

Amarachi Grace Okoronkwo (born 12 December 1992) is a Nigerian footballer who currently plays for Nasarawa Amazons in the Nigerian Women Premier League and the Nigeria women's national football team. She previously played for Kokkola F10 in Finland's Naisten Liiga.

Christie George

Christie George (born 10 May 1984) was a female Nigerian football forward.

She was part of the Nigeria women's national football team at the 2008 Summer Olympics.

Christopher Danjuma

Christopher Danjuma is the current head coach of Nasarawa Amazons in the Nigeria Women Premier League. Since August 2017, he has been doubling as the coach of Nigeria women's national under-20 football team following his recommendation and subsequent appointment by Nigeria Football Federation. He previously coached Nigeria women's national football team, after the sack of Edwin Okon in June 2015. He was relieved of his duties due to poor performance at the 2015 African Games, with Florence Omagbemi later occupying the vacant managerial role in February 2016.

Edwin Okon

Edwin Edem Okon (born October 19, 1970) is the head coach of Rivers Angels. Born in Cross River State, Okon got a coaching certificate from the sport institute in Lagos State. Following the failure of Nigeria to win the 2012 African Women's Championship, and the subsequent resignation of coach Kadiri Ikhana, Okon was appointed interim head coach of the Super Falcons in 2013.Nigeria's failure to advance to the knockout-round at the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup led to the sack of Okon by the Nigeria Football Federation and was replaced by his assistant, Christopher Danjuma on an interim basis.

Florence Iweta

Florence Iweta (born (1983-03-29)29 March 1983) is a Nigerian former football defender who played for the Nigeria women's national football team. She represented Nigeria at the 2000 Summer Olympics.

Florence Omagbemi

Florence Omagbemi (born February 2, 1975) is a Nigerian former football midfielder. She was part of the Nigeria women's national football team across four FIFA Women's World Cups, several Africa Women Cup of Nations and at the 2000 Summer Olympics. In 2016, she was named interim coach of the national side, having previously been an assistant coach to the Nigeria women's national under-20 football team.

Glory Iroka

Glory Iroka (born 3 January 1990) is a Nigerian international footballer who plays as a midfielder for Nigerian Women's Championship club Rivers Angels and the Nigeria women's national football team.

Jo Bonfrère

Johannes-Franciscus Bonfrère (born 15 June 1946) is a Dutch football coach and former midfielder who spent his playing career with MVV Maastricht. In a long coaching career Bonfrère managed several teams in Africa and Asia. He guided Nigeria to their victory in the 1996 Olympic Games.

Josephine Chukwunonye

Josephine Chukwunonye (born 19 March 1992) is a Nigerian footballer who plays for Kungsbacka in the Damallsvenskan, and for the Nigeria women's national football team. She previously played for Nigerian domestic side Rivers Angels for seven years, and for Washington Spirit in the National Women's Soccer League.

Kadiri Ikhana

Kadiri Ikhana (born 31 December 1951) is a Nigerian football coach and former player who last managed Kano Pillars.

Lilian Cole

Lilian Cole (born 18 January 1985) is a Nigerian football defender who played for the Nigeria women's national football team at the 2008 Summer Olympics.

List of Nigeria women's international footballers

This is a list of Nigeria women's international footballers who have played for the Nigeria women's national football team since the first match in 1991.

Ngozi Eucharia Uche

Ngozi Eucharia Uche (born June 18, 1973 in Mbaise, Imo State, Nigeria) is a former football player and a former head coach of the Nigeria women's national football team. Uche grew up in Owerri, Nigeria.

Nigeria women's national under-17 football team

Nigeria women's national under-17 football team represents Nigeria in international youth football competitions.

Nigeria women's national under-20 football team

Nigeria women's national under-20 football team, nicknamed the Falconets, represents Nigeria in international youth football competitions.

Ntiero Effiom

Ntiero Effiom (22 November 1946 – 10 September 2014) was a Nigerian football coach who managed Pelican Stars and the Nigeria women's national football team.

Paul Hamilton (footballer, born 1941)

Paul Ebiye Hamilton (31 July 1941 – 30 March 2017) was a Nigerian footballer and manager. He died at the Military Hospital in Lagos, Nigeria.

Rita Nwadike

Rita Nwadike (born 3 November 1974) was a Nigerian football midfielder who played for the Nigeria women's national football team at the 2004 Summer Olympics.

At the club level, she played for Rivers Angels.

She scored Nigeria's first ever female world cup goal against Canada in 1995 at Sweden.

Thomas Dennerby

Thomas Dennerby (born 13 August 1959 in Enskede) is a Swedish football coach.

FIFA Women's World Cup history
Year Round Date Opponent Result Stadium
China 1991 Group stage 17 November  Germany L 0–4 Jiangmen Stadium, Jiangmen
19 November  Italy L 0–1 Zhongshan Stadium, Zhongshan
21 November  Chinese Taipei L 0–2 Jiangmen Stadium, Jiangmen
Sweden 1995 Group stage 6 June  Norway L 0–8 Tingvallen, Karlstad
8 June  Canada D 3–3 Olympia Stadion, Helsingborg
10 June  England L 2–3 Tingvallen, Karlstad
United States 1999 Group stage 20 June  North Korea W 2–1 Rose Bowl, Pasadena
24 June  United States L 1–7 Soldier Field, Chicago
27 June  Denmark W 2–0 Jack Kent Cooke Stadium, Landover
Quarter-finals 1 July  Brazil L 3–4
United States 2003 Group stage 20 September  North Korea L 0–3 Lincoln Financial Field, Philadelphia
25 September  United States L 0–5
28 September  Sweden L 0–3 Columbus Crew Stadium, Columbus
China 2007 Group stage 11 September  Sweden D 1–1 Chengdu Sports Center, Chengdu
14 September  North Korea L 0–2
18 September  United States L 0–1 Hongkou Stadium, Shanghai
Germany 2011 Group stage 26 June  France L 0–1 Rhein-Neckar-Arena, Sinsheim
30 June  Germany L 0–1 Commerzbank-Arena, Frankfurt
5 July  Canada W 1–0 Rudolf-Harbig-Stadion, Dresden
Canada 2015 Group stage 8 June  Sweden D 3–3 Winnipeg Stadium, Winnipeg
12 June  Australia L 0–2
16 June  United States L 0–1 BC Place, Vancouver
France 2019 Group stage 8 June  Norway L 0–3 Stade Auguste-Delaune, Reims
12 June  South Korea W 2–0 Stade des Alpes, Grenoble
17 June  France L 0–1 Roazhon Park, Rennes
Round of 16 22 June  Germany L 0–3 Stade des Alpes, Grenoble
17 January 2019 2019 Four Nations TournamentChina PR 3–0 NigeriaWuhua County Olympic Sports Centre, Meizhou
19:35
Report Referee: Mi Siyu (China)
20 January 2019 2019 Four Nations TournamentRomania 1–4 NigeriaWuhua County Olympic Sports Centre, Meizhou
15:00
Referee: Chang Xinxin (China)
27 February 2019 2019 Cyprus Women's Cup Group StageNigeria 1–4 AustriaLarnaca, Cyprus
17:00
Report
Stadium: AEK Arena
1 March 2019 2019 Cyprus Women's Cup Group StageSlovakia 3–4 NigeriaAntonis Papadopoulos Stadium, Larnaca, Cyprus
13:00
Report
4 March 2019 2019 Cyprus Women's Cup Group StageNigeria 0–1 BelgiumGSZ Stadium, Larnaca, Cyprus
18:00 Report Dhont Goal 7'
6 March 2019 2019 Cyprus Women's Cup Seventh Place MatchNigeria 3–0 ThailandTasos Markos Stadium, Paralimni, Cyprus
15:00
4 April 2019 FriendlyNigeria 6–1Iceland UMF SelfossMurcia, Spain
  • Magda Goal 31'
Stadium: Pinatar Stadium
8 April 2019 FriendlyCanada 2–1 NigeriaMurcia, Spain
Report
Stadium: Pinatar Stadium
Referee: Marta Frías (Spain)
9 May 2019 2019 WAFU Zone B Women's Cup – GSBurkina Faso 1–5 NigeriaAbidjan, Côte d'Ivoire
Report
11 May 2019 2019 WAFU Zone B Women's Cup – GSNigeria 15–0 NigerAbidjan, Côte d'Ivoire
Report
14 May 2019 2019 WAFU Zone B Women's Cup – GSNigeria 2–0 MaliAbidjan, Côte d'Ivoire
Report
16 May 2019 2019 WAFU Zone B Women's Cup – SFNigeria 0–0
(5–4 p)
 GhanaAbidjan, Côte d'Ivoire
Report
18 May 2019 2019 WAFU Zone B Women's Cup – FinalIvory Coast 1–1
(4–5 p)
 NigeriaAbidjan, Côte d'Ivoire
Report
28 May 2019 FriendlyHaladas Viktoria Hungary1–5 NigeriaHungary
Report
  • Ihezuo Goal 32'
  • Ordega Goal 52'
  • Oshoala Goal 70' Goal 72'
  • Chukwudi Goal 84'
Stadium: Kiraly Sports Centre
2 June 2019 FriendlySlovenia ŽNK Pomurje0–3 NigeriaSlovenia
Report
Stadium: Beltinci
8 June 2019 2019 Women's World Cup – GSNorway 3–0 NigeriaReims, France
21:00
Report Stadium: Stade Auguste-Delaune
Attendance: 11,058
Referee: Kate Jacewicz (Australia)
12 June 2019 2019 Women's World Cup – GSNigeria 2–0 South KoreaGrenoble, France
15:00
Report Stadium: Stade des Alpes
Attendance: 11,252
Referee: Anastasia Pustovoitova (Russia)
17 June 2019 2019 Women's World Cup – GSNigeria 0–1 FranceRennes, France
21:00 Report
Stadium: Roazhon Park
Attendance: 28,267
Referee: Melissa Borjas (Honduras)
22 June 2019 2019 Women's World Cup – R16Germany 3–0 NigeriaGrenoble, France
17:30
Report Stadium: Stade des Alpes
Attendance: 17,988
Referee: Yoshimi Yamashita (Japan)
Men
League system
Domestic cups
Awards
Lists
Nigeria at the FIFA Women's World Cup
Nigeria squads – FIFA Women's World Cup
Nigeria women's football squads – Summer Olympics
National women's football teams of Africa (CAF)
North Africa (UNAF)
West Africa (WAFU)
East Africa (CECAFA)
Central Africa (UNIFFAC)
Southern Africa (COSAFA)
Non-regional Members

Languages

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