Newton Public Schools

Newton Public Schools is a school district in Newton, Massachusetts, United States. The district features four middle schools that lead into two high schools.

Newton Public Schools
Location
100 Walnut Street,
Newton, MA 02460

United States
District information
TypePublic
GradesK–12
SuperintendentDavid A. Fleishman[1]
Schools22
Budget$240,496,480 total
$18,778 per pupil
(2016)[2]
Students and staff
Students12,674[3]
Teachers1,013[4]
Student-teacher ratio12.4 to 1[4]
Other information
Average
SAT scores
622 verbal
636 math
1258 total (2017–2018)[5]
WebsiteNewton Public Schools

Schools

The Newton Public Schools are organized into an elementary school (K–5), middle school (6–8), and high school (9–12) arrangement. There was a projected enrollment of 11,237 students for FY06.

Level Number of schools Student avg. Student: teacher goal[6]
Elementary 15 333 27:1
Middle 4 633 17:1
High 2 1,858 16.1:1

Primary schools

  • Angier Elementary School
  • Bowen Elementary School
  • Burr Elementary School
  • Cabot Elementary School
  • Countryside Elementary School
  • Franklin Elementary School
  • Horace Mann Elementary School
  • Lincoln-Eliot Elementary School
  • Mason-Rice Elementary School
  • Memorial Spaulding Elementary School
  • Peirce Elementary School
  • Underwood Elementary School
  • Ward Elementary School
  • Williams Elementary School
  • Zervas Elementary School

Middle schools

  • Brown
  • Oak Hill
  • Bigelow
  • F.A. Day

High schools

Controversies

Textbook controversy

In October 2011, a controversy occurred over the content of a textbook used in World History classes which contained content that was allegedly anti-Semitic.[7] The textbook was later removed from the curriculum.[8]

Superintendent plagiarism

In July 2014, The Lion's Roar, the student newspaper of Newton South High School, accused Superintendent David Fleishman of using parts of a speech by Governor Deval Patrick without credit. The accusations were levied by two members of the class of 2014. After admitting that he had failed to cite the governor, the Newton School Committee fined Fleishman one week's pay of his $250,000 salary.[9]

Violations of Massachusetts' Open Meeting Law

On December 19, 2014 the Massachusetts Attorney General found that the Newton Public Schools and School Committee Chair Matthew Hills had committed eight violations of the state's Open Meeting Law in June and July 2014.[10] The violations occurred in connection with the plagiarism by Newton Superintendent David Fleishman. No sanctions were imposed on Hills other than reviewing the law.

References

  1. ^ "Central Administration". newton.k12.ma.us. Retrieved 30 November 2015.
  2. ^ "Per Pupil Expenditures, All Funds". mass.edu. Retrieved 11 April 2018.
  3. ^ "Enrollment Data (2013-14) - Newton (02070000)". mass.edu. Retrieved 30 November 2015.
  4. ^ a b "Teacher Data (2013-14) - Newton (02070000)". mass.edu. Retrieved 30 November 2015.
  5. ^ "2017-18 SAT Performance Statewide Report". mass.edu. September 20, 2018. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  6. ^ The pupil-teacher ratio goals were established by the School Committee of the Newton Public Schools.
  7. ^ "Parent: Newton South Material Defames Israeli Forces". Newton Tab. October 7, 2011.
  8. ^ "School Committee in 60 Seconds". Newton Tab. November 15, 2011. Archived from the original on October 27, 2013.
  9. ^ "Newton Schools Chief Fined for Use of Patrick's Words". Boston Globe. July 24, 2014.
  10. ^ "AG Rules School Committee Violated Open Meeting Laws". Newton Tab. December 23, 2014.

External links

Alexander H. Rice

Alexander Hamilton Rice (August 30, 1818 – July 22, 1895) was an American politician and businessman from Massachusetts. He served as Mayor of Boston from 1856 to 1857, a U.S. Congressman during the American Civil War, and as the 30th Governor of Massachusetts from 1876–78. He was part owner and president of Rice-Kendall, one of the nation's largest paper products distributors.

Educated at Union College, Rice was for many years involved in the paper business, and entered Boston politics in 1853. As mayor, he helped broker an agreement that began development of its Back Bay area. His Congressional service included the introduction of the failed Crittenden Compromise, oversight of naval affairs during the Civil War, and resistance to Radical Republican actions. As governor, he promoted social reform legislation and reductions in working hours.

Andover Regional School District

The Andover Regional School District is a regional public school district in Sussex County, New Jersey, United States, serving students in pre-kindergarten through eighth grade from Andover Borough and Andover Township.As of the 2014-15 school year, the district and its two schools had an enrollment of 852 students and 55.3 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 15.4:1.The district is classified by the New Jersey Department of Education as being in District Factor Group "FG", the fourth-highest of eight groupings. District Factor Groups organize districts statewide to allow comparison by common socioeconomic characteristics of the local districts. From lowest socioeconomic status to highest, the categories are A, B, CD, DE, FG, GH, I and J.Public school students in ninth through twelfth grades from both Andover Borough and Andover Township attend Newton High School in Newton, together with students from Green Township, as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Newton Public School District. As of the 2014-15 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 773 students and 66.5 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.6:1.

Anti-bias curriculum

The anti-bias curriculum is an activist approach to educational curricula which attempts to challenge prejudices such as racism, sexism, ableism, ageism, homophobia, and other forms of kyriarchy. The approach is favoured by civil rights organisations such as the Anti-Defamation League.The anti-racist curriculum is part of a wider social constructivist movement in the United Kingdom, United States and other Western societies, where many scientific worldviews are seen as manifestations of "white privileged" Western cultures, claiming that there is a sociocultural aspect to education; the studies of these subjects in Western societies have usually exhibited racial and cultural bias, and focuses too much on "dead white men", especially in mathematics.

Beijing Jingshan School

Beijing Jingshan School (Chinese: 北京景山学校; pinyin: Běijīng Jǐngshān Xuéxiào) is a high school and elementary school, located on Dengshikou road in Beijing, China.

Beijing Jingshan School was founded in 1960, and is the connection center for the Asian New Education Plan of UNESCO. In September 1983, Deng Xiaoping wrote for the School: "Education should be geared toward modernization, toward the world and toward the future." The message was later abbreviated as the "Three Orientations of Education" that has served as an important policy guideline for China’s education reform.

The Newton-Beijing Jingshan School Exchange Program, between the Beijing Jingshan School and the Newton Public Schools in Newton, Massachusetts, USA, is the oldest exchange program of public secondary school students between the United States and the People's Republic of China. The city of Newton hosts students and teachers for four months each fall and sends students and teachers to Beijing each spring.

The school's curriculum goes from primary school to high school.

It includes a swimming pool, a school museum, several large courtyards, a cafeteria, a recording room, an observatory for the astronomy club, several calligraphy rooms and art rooms.

All students wear the school's uniform which is different for each school. Primary school students wear white and purple, middle school students wear white and green, and high school students wear white and blue, all with a red strip around the arm and the school's crest and name on the chest. Primary school students wear the red scarf of the communist party (红领巾 hónglǐngjīn) around the neck.

Jingshan school is also one of the most famous exclusive schools in China. Many central government leaders' offspring studied here, such as Deng Xiaoping's grandchildren.

Brown Middle School

Brown Middle School may refer to the following schools:

Brown Middle School in the El Paso Independent School District in Texas

Joseph Emerson Brown Middle School in the Atlanta Public Schools in Georgia

R. A. Brown Middle School in the Hillsboro School District in Oregon

Charles E. Brown Middle School in the Newton Public Schools School District in Massachusetts

Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts

Chestnut Hill is a New England village located six miles (9.7 km) west of downtown Boston, Massachusetts, United States. Like all Massachusetts villages, Chestnut Hill is not an incorporated municipal entity. Unlike most Massachusetts villages, it encompasses parts of three separate municipalities, each located in a different county: the town of Brookline in Norfolk County; the city of Boston in Suffolk County (parts of its neighborhoods of Brighton and West Roxbury), and the city of Newton in Middlesex County. Chestnut Hill's borders are roughly defined by the 02467 ZIP Code. Chestnut Hill is not a topographical designation; the name refers to several small hills that overlook the 135-acre (546,000 m2) Chestnut Hill Reservoir rather than one particular hill. Chestnut Hill is best known as the home of Boston College, part of the Boston Marathon route, as well as the Collegiate Gothic canvas of landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted.

Day Middle School

Day Middle School may refer to the following schools:

Frank A. Day Middle School in the Newton Public Schools district in Newton, Massachusetts

James L. Day Middle School in the Temecula Valley Unified School District in Temecula, California

Green Township School District

The Green Township School District is a comprehensive community public school district that serves students in kindergarten through eighth grade from Green Township, in Sussex County, New Jersey, United States.

As of the 2014-15 school year, the district and its one school had an enrollment of 705 students and 37.7 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 18.7:1.The district is classified by the New Jersey Department of Education as being in District Factor Group "I", the second-highest of eight groupings. District Factor Groups organize districts statewide to allow comparison by common socioeconomic characteristics of the local districts. From lowest socioeconomic status to highest, the categories are A, B, CD, DE, FG, GH, I and J.Public school students in ninth through twelfth grades attend Newton High School in Newton, together with students from Andover Borough and Andover Township, as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Newton Public School District. As of the 2014-15 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 773 students and 66.5 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.6:1.

Massachusetts Board of Education

The Massachusetts Board of Elementary and Secondary Education (BESE) is the state education agency responsible for interpreting and implementing laws relevant to public education in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Public education in the Commonwealth is organized according to the regulations adopted by the BESE, which are good faith interpretations of Massachusetts state and federal law. The BESE's responsibilities include granting and renewing charter school applications, developing and implementing the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS), submitting yearly budget proposals for public education to the Massachusetts General Court, setting the standards for and certifying teachers, principals, and superintendents, and monitoring — as well as intervening to ameliorate — the achievement of underperforming districts in the Commonwealth.

Newton, Kansas

Newton is a city in and the county seat of Harvey County, Kansas, United States. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 19,132. Newton is located 25 miles (40 km) north of Wichita. The city of North Newton is located immediately north, existing as a separate political entity.

Newton, Massachusetts

Newton is a suburban city in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States. It is approximately 7 miles (11 km) west of downtown Boston and is bordered by Boston's Brighton and West Roxbury neighborhoods to the east and south, respectively, and by the suburb of Brookline to the east, the suburbs of Watertown and Waltham to the north, and Weston, Wellesley and Needham to the west. Rather than having a single city center, Newton resembles a patchwork of thirteen villages. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, the population of Newton was 85,146, making it the eleventh largest city in the state.

Newton Centre, Massachusetts

Newton Centre is a village of Newton, Massachusetts, United States. The main commercial center of Newton Centre is a triangular area surrounding the intersections of Beacon Street, Centre Street, and Langley Road. It is the largest downtown area among all the villages of Newton, and serves as a large upscale shopping destination for the western suburbs of Boston. The Newton City Hall and War Memorial is located at 1000 Commonwealth Avenue in Newton Centre.

Newton Highlands, Massachusetts

Newton Highlands is a village of Newton, Massachusetts. Newton Highlands is largely suburban outside the village and the commercial district running along Winchester and Needham Streets.

Newton Highlands' small commercial district runs along Lincoln St., perpendicular to Walnut St. This area, along with a stretch of fine 19th and early 20th century residences, are part of the Newton Highlands Historic District.

The first Brigham's Ice Cream shop was located in Newton Highlands.It was home to the Hyde School, an elementary school which burned down in a raging fire and is now the site of condominiums.

To the south, a dense commercial district along Needham Street includes stalwarts such as China Fair, and the New England Mobile Book Fair among many others.

Since 1959 the neighborhood has had its own MBTA Green Line station, Newton Highlands Station, close to this commercial center. There also is an annual celebration in June called Village Day, a general celebration for the Newton Highlands community. There is a 5 kilometer road race, crafts and local food is sold, a small carnival is set up, and local bands and musicians often entertain the crowds.

Newton South High School

Newton South High School is one of two public high schools in the city of Newton, Massachusetts, the other being Newton North.

Norman L. Benefiel

Norman L. "Dutch" Benefiel (August 31, 1924 – April 12, 2009) was an American politician and excavating contractor.

Born in Newton, Illinois, Benefiel went to the Newton Public Schools. He served in the United States Army during World War II. Benefiel worked as an excavating contractor and lived in Newton, Illinois. He was involved with the Democratic Party. Benefiel served in the Illinois House of Representatives in 1961 and 1962. He died at Richland Memorial Hospital in Olney, Illinois.

Oak Hill, Massachusetts

Oak Hill is one of thirteen villages of the city of Newton in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, USA.

Peirce School

The Peirce School (also known as Old Peirce School) is a historic school building at 88 Chestnut Street, corner of Austin Street, in West Newton, Massachusetts. The brick building was built in 1895 and operated by the Newton Public Schools as an elementary school from 1895 until June 1951. It originally served grades one through eight, but at the time of its closing, it was a kindergarten through sixth grade (K–6) school. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on December 6, 1979.

Thompsonville, Massachusetts

Thompsonville is one of the thirteen villages of Newton, Massachusetts.

It is located between Newton Centre, Newton Highlands, and Chestnut Hill.

As it is within the area of the Newton Public Schools school district, students who live in Thompsonville typically attend Bowen Elementary School, Oak Hill Middle School, and Newton South High School.

Thompsonville is one of the lesser known villages in Newton and does not have a village center as most of the other villages do.

Walton Rural Life Center

Walton Rural Life Center is an agricultural charter elementary school in Walton, Kansas, United States, established in 2006. During the 2015–2016 school year, there were 210 students at Walton Rural Life Center. They teach students from kindergarten to 4th grade, and there are two classes for each grade.

Massachusetts public high schools
Barnstable County
Berkshire County
Bristol County
Dukes County
Essex County
Franklin County
Hampden County
Hampshire County
Middlesex County
Nantucket County
Norfolk County
Plymouth County
Suffolk County
Worcester County

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