Newspaper circulation

A newspaper's circulation is the number of copies it distributes on an average day. Circulation is one of the principal factors used to set advertising rates. Circulation is not always the same as copies sold, often called paid circulation, since some newspapers are distributed without cost to the reader. Readership figures are usually higher than circulation figures because of the assumption that a typical copy of the newspaper is read by more than one person.

In many countries, circulations are audited by independent bodies such as the Audit Bureau of Circulations to assure advertisers that a given newspaper does indeed reach the number of people claimed by the publisher. There are international open access directories such as Mondo Times,[1] but these generally rely on numbers reported by newspapers themselves.

In many developed countries, newspaper circulation is falling due to social and technological changes such as the availability of news on the internet. On the other hand, in some developing countries circulation is increasing as these factors are more than cancelled out by rising incomes, population, and literacy.

World newspapers with the largest circulation

The World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers (WAN-IFRA) publishes a list of newspapers with the largest circulation. In 2011, India led the world in terms of newspaper circulation with nearly 330 million newspapers circulated daily.[2] In 2005, China topped the list in term of total newspaper circulation with 93.5 million a day, India came second with 78.8 million, followed by Japan, with 70.4 million; the United States, with 48.3 million; and Germany, with 22.1 million. Around 75 of the 100 best selling newspapers are in Asia and seven out of the top ten are Japanese newspapers.[3]

The Japanese Yomiuri Shimbun (読売新聞), Asahi Shimbun (朝日新聞) and Mainichi Shimbun (毎日新聞) are still the largest circulated newspapers in the world. The Times of India is the largest circulated English-language daily newspaper in the world, across all formats (Broadsheet, Compact, Berliner and Online). Reference News (《参考消息》) is the most popular paper in China.

According to the Guinness Book of Records, the daily circulation of the Soviet newspaper Komsomolskaya Pravda exceeded 21,500,000 in 1990, while the Soviet weekly Argumenty i Fakty boasted a circulation of 33,500,000 in 1991.

Individual countries

Australia

The Herald Sun has the highest circulation in Australia. Based in one if the country's two major cities, Melbourne, it is the result of the amalgamation of the original Sun and Herald newspapers.

Belgium

The Belgian institution CIM (Centre for Information about Media) publishes national circulation figures for all written, audiovisual and web-based media in Belgium. The top ten best selling papers according to their website [1] are Het Laatste Nieuws, 317,715; Het Nieuwsblad, 245,209; SUD Presse (group of papers focused on community specific content), 147,749; Het Belang van Limburg, 121,428; Le Soir, 113,780; Vers l’avenir, 109,287 (group of papers focused on community specific content); La Dernière Heure, 107,583; De Standaard, 104,758.

Canada

The most widely read paper in the country is the Toronto Star, which, as of the six-month period ending on March 31, 2007, averaged 634,886 copies sold on Saturday, 436,694 Monday to Friday, and 442,265 on Sunday.[4] The second most widely read paper is Toronto-based national newspaper The Globe and Mail, which averaged 374,000 copies on Saturdays, and 303,000 Monday to Friday. The most widely read French-language newspaper is Le Journal de Montréal, which averaged 319,899 copies on Saturday, 267,404 Monday to Friday, and 264,733 on Sunday. Unlike in the United States, newspapers in Canada published their biggest and mostly widely read editions on Saturdays.

India

The 2010 Indian Readership Survey findings[5] shows that the largest read local language newspapers to be Nav Gujarat (with 16.429 million readers) and Dainik Bhaskar (with 14.448 million readers), both published in Hindi. The Times of India is the most widely read English language newspaper ( 4.9 million), followed by Ananda Bazar Patrika (5.5 million), Nav Gujarat Samay (4.5 million), Hindustan Times (3.9 million), Eenadu (1.7 million), Dina Thanthi (1.6 million), Sakshi (1.45 million). The New Indian Express is another widely read English language newspaper (1.8 million). Malayala Manorama newspaper which is published in Malayalam from Kerala, currently has a readership of over 9.9 million (with a circulation base of over 2 million copies) has the most circulation in other languages.

Japan

The 2004 circulation figures for the morning and evening editions of Japan's largest newspapers: Yomiuri Shimbun, 14,067,000; The Asahi Shimbun, 12,121,000; Mainichi Shimbun, 5,587,000; Seikyo Shimbun, 5,500,000; Nihon Keizai Shimbun, 4,635,000; Chunichi Shimbun/Tokyo Shimbun,4,512,000; Tokyo Sports, 2,425,000; Sankei Shimbun, 2,757,000; Nikkan Sports, 1,965,000; Hokkaido Shimbun, 1,896,594; Sports Nippon, 1,711,000; The Nikkan Gendai, 1,686,000; Akahata, 1,683,000; Yukan Fuji, 1,559,000; Shizuoka Shimbun, 1,479,000; Sankei Sports, 1,368,000; Hochi Shimbun, 1,354,000; Daily Sports, 999,000.

Norway

The Norwegian Media Businesses' Association publishes national circulation figures for every newspaper in Norway every year. In 2011 the most read newspaper was the Oslo-based national newspaper Aftenposten, with a circulation of 235,795 followed by the tabloid Verdens Gang with 211,588. The local evening newspaper Aften averages 101,574 and the tabloid Dagbladet had 98,989 readers. The financial newspaper Dagens Næringsliv averaged 82,595. In the top ten list it is followed by five local newspapers: Bergens Tidende, 79,467; Adresseavisen, 71,657; Stavanger Aftenblad, 63,283; Fædrelandsvennen, 36,604 and Drammens Tidende, 33,352.[6]

Turkey

As of August 2016, the top 6 best selling papers are respectively: Hürriyet, 340,898; Sözcü, 322,829; Sabah, 313,989; Posta, 302,919; Habertürk, 253,256 and Milliyet, 143,577. Before it was seized by the government in March 2016 and eventually closed, Turkey's most circulated newspaper was the Gülen-aligned Zaman.

United Kingdom

According to the Audit Bureau of Circulations the best-selling papers as of January 2017 are The Sun, 1.67 million, The Daily Mail, 1.51 million and the Daily Mirror, 725,000.[7]

United States

The heyday of the newspaper industry was the 1940s, but the percentage of Americans reading newspapers began to decline with the increased competition from radio, television and, more recently, the Internet. A growing population helped the absolute circulation numbers continue to increase until the 1970s, where it remained stable until the 1990s, when absolute circulation numbers began declining.

Newspaper circulation numbers are reported to the Alliance for Audited Media. The best-selling papers in America, measured by combined daily average circulation as of March 31, 2013, are the Wall Street Journal with 2,378,827 in circulation; The New York Times at 1,865,318; and USA Today with 1,674,306. Overall, for the 593 reporting newspapers, daily circulation declined 0.7 percent year-over-year between March 2012 and March 2013. Sunday circulation was down 1.4 percent over the same period.[8]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Aboriginal Curriculum Resources". Queen's University Library. 2016-12-09. Archived from the original on 2016-12-26. Retrieved 2016-12-25.
  2. ^ "Print Media grows by 6.25%; Urdu at No. 3". twocircles.net. Archived from the original on 2012-06-01.
  3. ^ "World Association of Newspapers". wan-press.org. Archived from the original on 2015-06-24.
  4. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2007-09-27. Retrieved 2009-10-20.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  5. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2009-05-28. Retrieved 2009-11-05.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  6. ^ Opplagstallene for aviser, magasin og ukeblader for 2011 Archived 2012-06-18 at the Wayback Machine. Opplag.no
  7. ^ "National newspaper print ABCs for Jan 2017: Times and Observer both boost print sales year on year – Press Gazette". www.pressgazette.co.uk. Archived from the original on 4 December 2017. Retrieved 28 April 2018.
  8. ^ "Top 25 U.S. Newspapers For March 2013". 2013-04-30. Archived from the original on 2013-06-11. Retrieved 2013-06-09.

External links

Edmonton Journal

The Edmonton Journal is a daily newspaper in Edmonton, Alberta. It is part of the Postmedia Network.

Edmonton Sun

The Edmonton Sun is a daily newspaper and news website published in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. It is owned by Postmedia following its 2015 acquisition of Sun Media from Quebecor.

It began publishing in 1978 and shares many characteristics with Sun Media's other tabloids, including an emphasis on local news stories, its conservative editorial stance, extensive sports coverage, and a daily Sunshine Girl. Once each year, the Edmonton Sun prints a special swimsuit edition. Around Christmas time, they print a holiday lingerie edition.

Le Soleil (Quebec)

Le Soleil is a French-language daily newspaper in Quebec City, Quebec. It was founded on December 28, 1896 and is published in compact format since April 2006 (it had traditionally been printed in broadsheet). It is distributed mainly in Quebec City; however, it is also for sale at newsstands in Ottawa, Montreal, New Brunswick and some places in Florida, where many Quebecers spend the winter. It is owned by Groupe Capitales Médias.

On weekdays Le Soleil contains four sections : the front section (Actualités), containing local and international news coverage; the Arts & Life, or "B" section (Arts & Vie); the Business, or "C" section (Économie); and the Sports, or "S" section.

List of newspapers by circulation

This is a list of paid daily newspapers in the world by average circulation. Worldwide newspaper circulation figures are compiled by the International Federation of Audit Bureaux of Circulations and World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers. This list shows the latest figures that are publicly available through either organisation.

Some figures are disputed; the numbers for Japanese newspapers have been subjected to claims of "oshigami" (exaggeration by over-supplying papers to businesses). Free newspapers are not included in the list.

List of newspapers in Canada by circulation

Below is a list of Canada's top twenty-four newspapers by 2015 daily circulation.

List of newspapers in Egypt

Egypt has the highest number of printed publications in the region. The number of Arabic newspapers in the country was about 200 in 1938. There were also 65 newspapers published in languages other than Arabic. For instance, there were many newspapers published in Turkish in the country from 1828 to 1947. By 1951 Arabic newspapers was about 400 and those published in other languages was 150. As of 2011, daily newspaper circulation in Egypt was more than 4.3 million copies.The following is a list of newspapers in Egypt.

List of newspapers in Italy

The number of national daily newspapers in Italy was 107 in 1950, whereas it was 78 in 1965. There are also regional newspapers in the country some of which circulation is larger than that of national papers.

List of newspapers in Spain

In 1950 the number of daily newspapers in circulation in Spain was 104; by 1965 this figure had fallen to 87. In 1984, in the period following the transition to democracy, the number of daily newspapers had risen to 115. Since then, however, the advent of new media has been accompanied by a decline both in newspaper circulation figures overall and in the number of titles published, the years 2008 to 2012 seeing the closure of 31 titles.

List of newspapers in Sweden

The number of newspapers in Sweden was 235 in 1919. It reduced to 125 papers in the mid-1960s. In 2009 the number of the newspapers was 90 in the country.This is a list of Swedish language newspapers in with their respective cities of publication. Swedish newspaper circulation (number of copies sold) is measured by Tidningsstatistik AB.

Media of Tajikistan

For most of the population, radio and television are the most important sources of information. During the civil war (1992–97), the Rakhmonov government severely repressed both broadcast and print media; since that time, neither has recovered independent operations. In 2006 six government television stations and 18 private stations were in operation, but most of the latter depended on government transmission equipment. Although the law requires registration of independent broadcast outlets, some unlicensed stations have operated. Russian channels are received by satellite, and most regions receive one of the two national television channels. Radio stations broadcast in Persian, Russian, Tajik, and Uzbek. In 2000 there were 141 radios and 326 television sets per 1,000 population.In the post-Soviet era, newspaper circulation has decreased sharply because of the high expense of materials and the poverty of the population. As a result of government pressure and refusal of license renewals, no opposition newspapers were operating in the run-up to the 2006 presidential election. Among the most-read newspapers are Jumhuriyat (Republic, in Tajik, thrice weekly), Khalk ovozi (Voice of the People, in Uzbek, thrice weekly), Kurer Tadzhikistana (Tajikistan Courier, in Russian, weekly), Sadoi mardum (Voice of the People, in Tajik, thrice weekly), and Tojikiston (Tajikistan, in Tajik, thrice weekly). In 2006 four domestic news agencies and one Russian agency (RIA Novosti) were operating.

Ottawa Citizen

The Ottawa Citizen is an English-language daily newspaper owned by Postmedia Network in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

The London Free Press

The London Free Press is a daily newspaper based in London, Ontario, Canada. It has the largest circulation of any newspaper in Southwestern Ontario.

The New Zealand Herald

The New Zealand Herald is a daily newspaper published in Auckland, New Zealand, owned by New Zealand Media and Entertainment. It has the largest newspaper circulation of all newspapers in New Zealand, peaking at over 200,000 copies in 2006, although circulation of the daily Herald had declined to 115,213 copies on average by December 2017. Its main circulation area is the Auckland region. It is also delivered to much of the north of the North Island including Northland, Waikato and King Country.

The StarPhoenix

The StarPhoenix is a daily newspaper that serves Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, and is a part of Postmedia Network. The StarPhoenix puts out six editions each week and publishes one weekly, Bridges. It is also part of the canada.com Internet portal.

The Star (Kenya)

The Star is a daily newspaper based in Nairobi, Kenya. It was launched in July 2007 as the Nairobi Star and later rebranded as The Star in 2009.The Star's circulation was around 15,000–20,000 in 2010 (against total Kenyan newspaper circulation in 2010 of around 320,000), compared to 5,000–8,000 in 2007. The paper first made a profit in September 2009.

Toronto Sun

The Toronto Sun is an English-language daily newspaper published in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Windsor Star

The Windsor Star is a daily newspaper in Windsor, Ontario. Owned by Postmedia Network, it is published Tuesdays through Saturdays.

Winnipeg Free Press

The Winnipeg Free Press is a daily (excluding Sunday) broadsheet newspaper in Winnipeg, Manitoba. It provides coverage of local, provincial, national, international, sports, business, and entertainment news. Various consumer-oriented features such as homes and automobiles appear on a weekly basis. The newspaper's main competition is the Winnipeg Sun, a print daily tabloid.

Founded in 1872 as the Manitoba Free Press, it is the oldest newspaper in western Canada. It has the largest readership of any newspaper in the province and is regarded as the newspaper of record for Winnipeg and Manitoba. The newspaper's existence began only two years after Manitoba's joining of Confederation in 1870, and predated Winnipeg's incorporation in 1873.

Yomiuri Shimbun

The Yomiuri Shimbun (読売新聞, Yomiuri Shinbun) is a Japanese newspaper published in Tokyo, Osaka, Fukuoka, and other major Japanese cities. It is part of the Yomiuri Group, Japan's largest media conglomerate. It is one of the five national newspapers in Japan; the other four are the Asahi Shimbun, the Mainichi Shimbun, Nihon Keizai Shimbun, and the Sankei Shimbun. The headquarters is in Otemachi, Chiyoda, Tokyo.Founded in 1874, the Yomiuri Shimbun is credited with having the largest newspaper circulation in the world, having a combined morning and evening circulation of 14,323,781 through January 2002. In 2010, the daily was the number one in the list of the world's biggest selling newspapers with a circulation of 10,021,000. As of mid-year 2011, it still had a combined morning-evening circulation of almost 13.5 million for its national edition. The paper is printed twice a day and in several different local editions.

Yomiuri Shimbun established the Yomiuri Prize in 1948. Its winners have included Yukio Mishima and Haruki Murakami.

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