Newport County, Rhode Island

Newport County is one of five counties located in the U.S. state of Rhode Island. As of the 2010 census, the population was 82,888.[1] It is also one of the seven regions of Rhode Island. The county was created in 1703.[2] Like all of the counties in Rhode Island, Newport County no longer has any governmental functions (other than as court administrative and sheriff corrections boundaries). All of those functions in Rhode Island are now carried out either by the state government, or by the cities and towns of Rhode Island. Newport County is included in the Providence-Warwick, RI-MA Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is in turn constitutes a portion of the greater Boston-Worcester-Providence, MA-RI-NH-CT Combined Statistical Area.

Newport County, Rhode Island
County
Old Rhode Island State House edit1
Map of Rhode Island highlighting Newport County

Location within the U.S. state of Rhode Island
Map of the United States highlighting Rhode Island

Rhode Island's location within the U.S.
FoundedJune 22, 1703
Largest cityNewport
Area
 • Total314 sq mi (813 km2)
 • Land102 sq mi (264 km2)
 • Water211 sq mi (546 km2), 67%
Population (est.)
 • (2018)82,542
 • Density810/sq mi (310/km2)
Congressional district1st
Time zoneEastern: UTC−5/−4

History

Newport County was constituted on June 22, 1703, as one of the two original counties of the Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations. As originally established, Newport County consisted of four towns: Portsmouth, Newport, Jamestown, and New Shoreham. In 1746-47, two towns, Little Compton and Tiverton, were acquired from Massachusetts. In 1856, the town of Fall River was split off from Tiverton but was ceded to Massachusetts six years later in 1862 as part of the settlement of the boundary dispute between Rhode Island and Massachusetts. In 1963, the town of New Shoreham was transferred to Washington County. County government was abolished in Rhode Island in 1842 and today remains only for the purpose of delineating judicial administrative boundaries.

Geography

Pocasset Hill, RI, summit
Summit of Pocasset Hill, highest point in the county

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 314 square miles (810 km2), of which 102 square miles (260 km2) is land and 211 square miles (550 km2) (67%) is water.[3]

The county consists of Aquidneck Island, Conanicut Island, Prudence Island, and the easternmost portion of the state on the mainland. The highest point in the county is Pocasset Hill, 320 feet (98 m) above sea level, located in Tiverton. The lowest elevation is at sea level.

Adjacent counties

National protected areas

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
179014,351
180014,8453.4%
181016,2949.8%
182015,771−3.2%
183016,5354.8%
184016,8742.1%
185020,00718.6%
186021,8969.4%
187020,050−8.4%
188024,18020.6%
189028,55218.1%
190032,59914.2%
191039,33520.7%
192042,8939.0%
193041,668−2.9%
194046,69612.1%
195061,53931.8%
196081,89133.1%
197094,55915.5%
198081,383−13.9%
199087,1947.1%
200085,433−2.0%
201082,888−3.0%
Est. 201882,542[4]−0.4%
U.S. Decennial Census[5]
1790-1960[6] 1900-1990[7]
1990-2000[8] 2010-2018[1]

2000 census

As of the census[9] of 2000, there were 85,433 people, 35,228 households, and 22,228 families residing in the county. The population density was 821 people per square mile (317/km²). There were 39,561 housing units at an average density of 380 per square mile (147/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 91.46% White, 3.73% Black or African American, 0.43% Native American, 1.23% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 1.09% from other races, and 1.99% from two or more races. 2.82% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 19.6% were of Irish, 13.2% Portuguese, 11.8% English, 9.2% Italian, 6.3% German and 5.2% French ancestry. 92.0% spoke English, 2.3% Spanish, 2.1% Portuguese and 1.3% French as their first language.

There were 35,228 households out of which 28.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.90% were married couples living together, 10.30% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.90% were non-families. 29.90% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.80% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.35 and the average family size was 2.95.

In the county, the population was spread out with 22.50% under the age of 18, 8.40% from 18 to 24, 29.90% from 25 to 44, 24.80% from 45 to 64, and 14.40% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females, there were 94.60 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.40 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $50,448, and the median income for a family was $60,610. Males had a median income of $41,630 versus $29,241 for females. The per capita income for the county was $26,779. About 5.40% of families and 7.10% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.00% of those under age 18 and 6.70% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 82,888 people, 34,911 households, and 21,076 families residing in the county.[10] The population density was 809.6 inhabitants per square mile (312.6/km2). There were 41,796 housing units at an average density of 408.2 per square mile (157.6/km2).[11] The racial makeup of the county was 90.2% white, 3.5% black or African American, 1.6% Asian, 0.4% American Indian, 0.1% Pacific islander, 1.4% from other races, and 3.0% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 4.2% of the population.[10] The largest ancestry groups were:

  • Republic of Ireland 25.5% Irish
  • England 17.4% English
  • Portugal 16.5% Portuguese
  • Italy 10.9% Italian
  • Germany 10.5% German
  • France 9.4% French
  • Poland 5.0% Polish
  • Canada 3.9% French Canadian
  • Scotland 3.3% Scottish
  • United States 3.0% American
  • Northern Ireland 2.1% Scotch-Irish
  • Sweden 1.8% Swedish
  • Puerto Rico 1.6% Puerto Rican
  • Russia 1.4% Russian
  • Netherlands 1.1% Dutch
  • Greece 1.0% Greek
  • 1.0% Sub-Saharan African

[12]

Of the 34,911 households, 26.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.8% were married couples living together, 10.2% had a female householder with no husband present, 39.6% were non-families, and 32.2% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.27 and the average family size was 2.89. The median age was 43.2 years.[10]

The median income for a household in the county was $67,239 and the median income for a family was $82,477. Males had a median income of $58,191 versus $43,623 for females. The per capita income for the county was $36,994. About 4.5% of families and 7.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.4% of those under age 18 and 6.1% of those age 65 or over.[13]

Communities

Map of Newport County Rhode Island With Municipal Labels
Map of Newport County, Rhode Island showing cities, towns, and CDPs

City

Towns

Census-designated places

Villages

Villages have no separate corporate existence from the towns they are in.

  • Adamsville
  • Beavertail
  • Bridgeport
  • Briggs Point
  • Bristol Ferry
  • Castle Hill
  • Cedar Island
  • Cedar Point
  • Coasters Harbor
  • Coddington Point
  • Common Fence Point
  • Conanicut
  • Corey Lane
  • Despair Island
  • Dutch Island
  • Dyer Island
  • Eagleville
  • Easton Point
  • Fogland Point
  • Fort Adams
  • Forty Steps
  • Freebody Hill
  • Goat Island
  • Gould Island
  • Grayville
  • Green's End
  • Hog Island
  • Homestead
  • Hope Island
  • Hummocks
  • Island Park
  • Nannaquaket
  • North Tiverton
  • Ochre Point
  • Patience
  • Prudence
  • Quaker Hill
  • Rose Island
  • Sachuest
  • Sakonnet
  • Tiverton Four Corners
  • Tonomy Hill
  • Tunipus
  • Wightmans Corner

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 15, 2011. Retrieved November 22, 2013.
  2. ^ "Rhode Island: Individual County Chronologies". Rhode Island Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2009. Retrieved March 15, 2015.
  3. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved March 14, 2015.
  4. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved May 6, 2019.
  5. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 14, 2015.
  6. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved March 14, 2015.
  7. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 14, 2015.
  8. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved March 14, 2015.
  9. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  10. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 12, 2016.
  11. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 12, 2016.
  12. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 12, 2016.
  13. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 12, 2016.
  14. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 7 April 2018.

External links

Coordinates: 41°31′N 71°16′W / 41.51°N 71.26°W

Community College of Rhode Island

The Community College of Rhode Island, commonly abbreviated as "CCRI", is the only community college in Rhode Island and the largest community college in New England. The college's primary facility is located in Warwick, with additional college buildings throughout the state.

Conanicut Island Light

Conanicut Island Light (also known as Conanicut Island Lighthouse), built in 1886, is an inactive lighthouse in Jamestown, Rhode Island.

The light was built primarily to assist the ferry between Jamestown and Newport, Rhode Island. The lighthouse lies on the northern tip of Conanicut Island in Jamestown. The light was deactivated in 1933 and its lantern was removed. In 1934 it was sold as government surplus and is now a private residence. The lighthouse is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It was featured in Wes Anderson's 2012 film Moonrise Kingdom.

Despair Island

Despair Island is a small island in Narragansett Bay in Newport County, Rhode Island. It is located between Hope Island and Prudence Island. The island is composed of many outcroppings of rocks used extensively by nesting birds, such as gulls and terns.

Despair Island is marked with a buoy because it is hard to see during daylight hours; it is barely visible at high tide, and the pile of rocks are almost impossible to distinguish between land and water at night. In 2010, two people were killed and three injured when their boat ran aground on the island during a nighttime boat ride.

Gould Island (Rhode Island)

Gould Island lies east of Conanicut Island in Narragansett Bay in the U.S. state of Rhode Island. It is a part of the town of Jamestown, Rhode Island, and has a land area of 55.3 acres (22.4 ha).

Hope Island (Rhode Island)

Hope Island is a 91-acre (0.368 km²) island located in Narragansett Bay in the State of Rhode Island. It is part of the Narragansett Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, along with nearby Prudence Island and Patience Island, and home to colonial wading birds during their nesting season of spring and summer.

Jamestown Windmill

The Jamestown Windmill is a smock mill in Jamestown, Rhode Island within the Windmill Hill Historic District on North Road north of Weeden Lane.

The 30-foot (9.1 m) high windmill was built in 1787 to grind corn after the British occupational forces destroyed the previous mill around the time of the Battle of Rhode Island. It operated until 1896. Several renovations were done in the 20th century, and it is maintained by the Jamestown Historical Society. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1973.

Melville, Rhode Island

Melville is a census-designated place (CDP) in the towns of Middletown and Portsmouth in Newport County, Rhode Island, United States. It lies along the shore of Narragansett Bay. The population of the CDP was 2,325 at the 2000 census.

Middletown, Rhode Island

Middletown is a town in Newport County, Rhode Island, United States. The population was 16,150 at the 2010 census. It lies to the south of Portsmouth and to the north of Newport on Aquidneck Island, hence the name "Middletown".

National Register of Historic Places listings in Little Compton, Rhode Island

This is a list of Registered Historic Places in Little Compton, Rhode Island, which has been transferred from and is an integral part of National Register of Historic Places listings in Newport County, Rhode Island.

This National Park Service list is complete through NPS recent listings posted May 10, 2019.

National Register of Historic Places listings in Newport County, Rhode Island

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Newport County, Rhode Island.

This is intended to be a complete list of the properties and districts on the National Register of Historic Places in Newport County, Rhode Island, United States. Latitude and longitude coordinates are provided for many National Register properties and districts; these locations may be seen together in a map.There are 123 properties and districts listed on the National Register in the county, including 24 National Historic Landmarks.

This National Park Service list is complete through NPS recent listings posted May 10, 2019.

National Register of Historic Places listings in Tiverton, Rhode Island

This is a list of Registered Historic Places in Tiverton, Rhode Island, which has been transferred from and is an integral part of National Register of Historic Places listings in Newport County, Rhode Island.

This National Park Service list is complete through NPS recent listings posted May 10, 2019.

Naval Justice School

The Naval Justice School (NJS) is an educational institution of the United States Navy whose mission is to instruct Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard officers and enlisted personnel in the fundamental principles of military justice, civil and administrative law, and procedure. In addition to being licensed attorneys in any state or territory of the U.S., all attorneys in the Judge Advocate General's Corps must undergo training either in this institution, or in the complementary institutions of the U.S. Army and the U.S. Air Force, allowing them to act as trial or defense counsel at military courts-martial.

The Naval Justice School was founded in 1946 at Port Hueneme, California and moved to Newport, Rhode Island in 1950. It has additional campuses in Norfolk, Virginia and San Diego, California. Beginning in 1990, the institution also began instructing U.S. civilians and foreign government officials in human rights law.

Newport Historical Society

The Newport Historical Society is a historical society in Newport, Rhode Island that was chartered in 1854 to collect and preserve books, manuscripts, and objects pertaining to Newport's history.

Preservation Society of Newport County

The Preservation Society of Newport County is a private, non-profit organization based in Newport, Rhode Island. It is Rhode Island's largest and most-visited cultural organization. The organization protects the architectural heritage of Newport County, especially the Bellevue Avenue Historic District. Seven of its 14 historic properties and landscapes are National Historic Landmarks, and most are open to the public.

Prudence Island

Prudence Island is the third-largest island in Narragansett Bay in the state of Rhode Island and part of the town of Portsmouth, Rhode Island. It is located near the geographical center of the bay. It is defined by the United States Census Bureau as Block Group 3, Census Tract 401.03 of Newport County, Rhode Island. As of the 2000 census, the population was 88 people living on a land area of 14.43 km² (5.57 sq mi).

Prudence Island Light

The Prudence Island Lighthouse, more commonly known locally as the Sandy Point Lighthouse, is located on Prudence Island, Rhode Island and is the oldest lighthouse tower in the state. Sandy Point is nicknamed Chibacoweda, meaning "little place separated by a passage", because the location is a little more than one mile offshore.

Sakonnet River

The Sakonnet River is a tidal strait in the U.S. state of Rhode Island. It flows approximately 23 km (14 mi) between Mount Hope Bay and Rhode Island Sound. It separates Aquidneck Island from the eastern portion of Newport County.

Tiverton, Rhode Island

Tiverton is a town in Newport County, Rhode Island, United States. The population was 15,780 at the 2010 census.

U.S. Navy Senior Enlisted Academy

The United States Navy Senior Enlisted Academy provides education and training for senior and master chief petty officers. Most of the students are active-duty U.S. Navy personnel. The remaining students are from the Navy Reserve, Air Force, Army, Coast Guard, Marine Corps, and other nations' armed forces. https://www.public.navy.mil/netc/sea/Default.aspx

Places adjacent to Newport County, Rhode Island
Municipalities and communities of Newport County, Rhode Island, United States
City
Towns
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Other
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