Newhey

Newhey (archaically New Hey[1]) is a suburban village in the Milnrow area of the Metropolitan Borough of Rochdale,[2] in Greater Manchester, England. It lies at the foot of the South Pennines, by Junction 21 of the M62 motorway and on the River Beal, 2.7 miles (4.3 km) east-southeast of Rochdale, 10.3 miles (16.6 km) northeast of Manchester.

Historically a part of Lancashire, Newhey was anciently a hamlet within the township of Butterworth. It was described in 1828 as "consisting of several ranges of cottages and two public houses".[3] In the early 19th century a major road was built through Newhey from Werneth to Littleborough. Newhey was incorporated into the Milnrow Urban District in 1894.

Newhey expanded as part of an unplanned process of urbanisation, brought on by the introduction of textile manufacture during the Industrial Revolution, and is now home to the Ellenroad Steam Museum - the engine house of the former Ellenroad Ring Mill, the rest of which was demolished in 1985. It holds the world's largest working steam engine.

Newhey
Newhey from Shaw

Newhey from its boundary with Shaw and Crompton
Newhey is located in Greater Manchester
Newhey
Newhey
Location within Greater Manchester
OS grid referenceSD934115
Metropolitan borough
Metropolitan county
Region
CountryEngland
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Post townROCHDALE
Postcode districtOL16
Dialling code01706
PoliceGreater Manchester
FireGreater Manchester
AmbulanceNorth West
EU ParliamentNorth West England
UK Parliament

History

Ellenroad Ring Mill - Newhey
Ellenroad Ring Mill, as it was in 1984.

Lying by the older localities of Milnrow, Ogden and Haugh, Newhey is thought to have acquired its name as a result of land reclamation.[3]

Newhey was home to the Newhey Brick and Terracotta Co. Ltd., a prosperous brick and tile works which opened on Huddersfield Road in 1899. Its bricks are found in buildings worldwide. Most mills and associated terraced houses in the Rochdale and Oldham areas were built from this "Newhey brick".

In the 1920s, Newhey had at least five cotton mills, including Ellenroad, Newhey, Coral, Haugh and Garfield (demolished 1969).

Governance

From a very early time, Newhey was part of the Butterworth township of Rochdale parish, in the Hundred of Salfordshire.

From 1894 to 1974, Newhey was part of Milnrow Urban District in the administrative county of Lancashire.[4] In the local government reforms of 1974, this urban district status was abolished and Newhey is now part of the Metropolitan Borough of Rochdale.

Newhey was previously part of the Littleborough and Saddleworth constituency. It is now represented in the House of Commons as part of the parliamentary constituency of Rochdale.

Geography

Newhey
Looking over Newhey

Localities in and around Newhey include Haugh and Woodbottom. Several reservoirs lie above and to the east, including Ogden, Kitcliffe and Piethorne.

Landmarks

St Thomas's, Newhey
St Thomas's at Newhey

Milnrow War Memorial, a Grade II listed structure, is in Newhey's Memorial Park.[5] Originally in central Milnrow (set back from the road near Milnrow Bridge), it was unveiled in 1924 by Major General A Solly-Flood, a former commander of 42nd (East Lancashire) Division. Sculpted from Sandstone by G Thomas in 1923, the memorial is surmounted by a bronze statue of a First World War infantry soldier with rifle and fixed bayonet, symbolic of the district's young manhood in early First World War. The plinth has bronze and slate panels which show the names of local men who died in the two World Wars.[6]

Ellenroad Engine House was designed by Sir Philip Stott, 1st Baronet. Its tall chimney makes it a local landmark.

Newhey parish church, dedicated to St. Thomas, was built in 1876 to serve the new Anglican parish of Newhey.[7] Its patron is the Bishop of Manchester.[8] The church was badly damaged by arson on 21 December 2007.[9]

Transport

Newhey is served by the M62 motorway and Newhey Metrolink station.
Bus Services 58, 181, 182 and 451 serve Oldham, Manchester, Milnrow and Rochdale, operated by First Greater Manchester and Manchester Community Transport[10]

See also

References

  1. ^ Youngs (1991), p. 172.
  2. ^ Rochdale Metropolitan Borough Council (N.D.), p. 32.
  3. ^ a b Butterworth (1828), p. 113.
  4. ^ Milnrow UD, Vision of Britain. URL accessed 3 January 2007.
  5. ^ Wyke, Terry (2005). Public Sculpture of Greater Manchester. Liverpool University Press. ISBN 0-85323-567-8.
  6. ^ Memorial - maintenance - Rochdale Metropolitan Borough Council Archived 17 October 2008 at the Wayback Machine
  7. ^ Newhey EP Lancashire through time | Local history overview for the Ecclesiastical Parish
  8. ^ Townships - Butterworth | British History Online
  9. ^ Church hit by fire - News - Rochdale Observer
  10. ^ "Network Maps: Rochdale". Transport for Greater Manchester. Archived from the original on 2 November 2012. Retrieved 10 September 2012.

Bibliography

  • Butterworth, James (1828). A History And Description Of The Town And Parish Of Rochdale In Lancashire. W D Varey.
  • Rochdale Metropolitan Borough Council (n.d.). Metropolitan Rochdale Official Guide. London: Ed. J. Burrow & Co. Limited.
  • Youngs, F. (1991). Local Administrative Units: Northern England. Royal Historical Society.

External links

2008 Rochdale Metropolitan Borough Council election

Elections to Rochdale Council in Greater Manchester, England were held on 1 May 2008. One third of the council was up for election. The Liberal Democrats stayed in control of the council after gaining seats in Balderstone and Kirkholt, and North Heywood from the Labour party but losing East Middleton back to Labour.After the election, the composition of the council was:

Liberal Democrat 33

Labour 19

Conservative 8

2010 Rochdale Metropolitan Borough Council election

Elections to Rochdale Council in Greater Manchester, England were held on 6 May 2010, the same day as the general election, with one-third of the council facing the voters. The Liberal Democrats lost control of the council.

After the election, the composition of the council was:

Liberal Democrat 26

Labour 22

Conservative 11

2011 Rochdale Metropolitan Borough Council election

Elections to Rochdale Council in Greater Manchester, England were held on 5 May 2011, the same day as the General election. One third of the council was up for election.

After the election, the composition of the council was:

Labour 29

Conservative 14

Liberal Democrat 13

Others 4

2014 Rochdale Metropolitan Borough Council election

The 2014 Rochdale Metropolitan Borough Council election took place on 22 May 2014 to elect members of Rochdale Metropolitan Borough Council in England. This was on the same day as other local elections.

The Labour Party retained control of the Council

After the election, the composition of the council was:

Labour 48

Conservative 11

Liberal Democrat 1

2015 Rochdale Metropolitan Borough Council election

The 2015 Rochdale Metropolitan Borough Council election took place on 7 May 2015 to elect one third of the members of Rochdale Metropolitan Borough Council in England. This took place on the same day as the 2015 General Election and other local elections.The Labour Party retained control of the council.

After the election, the composition of the council was:

Labour 47

Conservative 10

Liberal Democrat 2

Independent (Rochdale First)1

2018 Rochdale Metropolitan Borough Council election

The 2018 Rochdale Borough Council election took place on 3 May 2018 to elect members of Rochdale Borough Council in England. This was on the same day as other local elections.

Bu-Val Buses

Bu-Val Buses was an independent bus operator, situated in Littleborough, Greater Manchester. The company started operations in 1990 and provide a number of local services in the Greater Manchester area, originally in the Rochdale and Littleborough areas, before expanding out to the Bury, Manchester, Oldham, Saddleworth, Salford and Tameside areas. In February 2011, the company started a free night bus service running into Rochdale town centre from surrounding areas. The service runs along three routes. The service starts in Bacup via Whitworth to Rochdale before heading to Littleborough via Milnrow and Newhey into the town centre and then heading to Heywood and running to Middleton and Castleton and back into town. In May 2011, only a few weeks after winning new contracts on evening and Sunday services in the Rochdale area, it was announced that the company had ceased trading following failure to operate services.

Butterworth (ancient township)

Butterworth was a township occupying the southeastern part of the parish of Rochdale, in the hundred of Salford, Lancashire, England. It encompassed 12.1 square miles (31 km2) of land in the South Pennines which spanned the settlements of Belfield, Bleaked-gate-cum-Roughbank, Butterworth Hall, Clegg, Haughs, Hollingworth, Kitcliffe, Lowhouse, Milnrow, Newhey, Ogden, Rakewood, Smithy Bridge, Tunshill and Wildhouse. It extended to the borders of Crompton to the south, and to the highest points of Bleakedgate Moor and Clegg Moor, up to the ridge of Blackstone Edge, to the east, where its boundary was the old county boundary between Lancashire and Yorkshire.Butterworth was probably settled in Saxon times in the Early Middle Ages. Its land was divided into two divisions, the Lordship side with rents or services payable to the lord of the manor and the Freehold side that retained its importance until 1879 as a Registration district for births, deaths and marriages. In 1830, Butterworth was recorded to have 5,554 inhabitants.

Drake Street tram stop

Drake Street tram stop was a proposed tram stop for Greater Manchester's Metrolink light rail system, that was to be created to serve passengers boarding and alighting at Drake Street in Rochdale, England. It was also known by the name Wet Rake tram stop, and was set to be located on the Oldham and Rochdale Line between Rochdale railway station and Rochdale Town Centre tram stop.

Drake Street was set to be constructed during Phase 3b of Metrolink's expansion, but in March 2011 it was scrapped by the Greater Manchester Passenger Transport Executive which believed it would be too close to Rochdale Town Centre and could serve as an efficiency saving to allow the construction of Kingsway Business Park tram stop.

Ellenroad Mill

Ellenroad Mill was a cotton spinning mill in Newhey, Milnrow, Rochdale in England. It was built as a mule spinning mill in 1890 by Stott and Sons and extended in 1899. It was destroyed by fire on 19 Jan 1916. When it was rebuilt, it was designed and equipped as a ring spinning mill.

After closure, the mill itself was demolished in 1982, but the engine house – complete with steam engine – and the boiler house chimney were retained. Ownership passed to the Ellenroad Trust. The Ellenroad Ring Mill Engine is steamed on the First Sunday of the month (except January for boiler inspection).

Ellenroad Ring Mill Engine

The Ellenroad Ring Mill Engine is a preserved stationary steam engine in Newhey, Greater Manchester, England. It powered the Ellenroad Ring Mill from 1917, and after the mill's closure the engine is still worked under steam as a museum display.

At 3000 hp, the twin tandem compound steam engine is possibly the most powerful of the type in preservation. The two engines are named Victoria and Alexandra, multiple ropes around the flywheel drove the line shafts on each floor of the mill which in turn drove the ring spinning frames.

In addition to the mill engine, the museum also houses in operational condition the original Ellenroad mill pilot generator engine and sprinkler pump, the Whitelees Beam Engine, and the Irene Engine. The museum trust also owns the surviving components of the Fern Mill Engine, which it hopes eventually to restore to working condition.

Greater Manchester bus route 58

Greater Manchester Bus route 58 is operated by First Greater Manchester between Rochdale and Middleton bus stations via Milnrow, Newhey, Shaw & Crompton, Oldham and Chadderton. It has a sister route 59 which operates on the same route between Middleton and Shaw, and also serves Rushcroft.

Milnrow

Milnrow (pop. 13,062 (2011)) is a suburban town within the Metropolitan Borough of Rochdale, in Greater Manchester, England. It lies on the River Beal at the foothills of the South Pennines, and forms a continuous urban area with Rochdale. It is 1.9 miles (3.1 km) east of Rochdale town centre, 10.4 miles (16.7 km) north-northeast of Manchester, and spans urban, suburban and rural locations—from Windy Hill in the east to the Rochdale Canal in the west. Milnrow is adjacent to junction 21 of the M62 motorway, and includes the village of Newhey, and hamlets at Tunshill and Ogden.

Historically in Lancashire, Milnrow during the Middle Ages was one of several hamlets in the township of Butterworth and parish of Rochdale. The settlement was named by the Anglo-Saxons, but the Norman conquest of England resulted in its ownership by minor Norman families, such as the Schofields and Cleggs. In the 15th century, their descendants successfully agitated for a chapel of ease by the banks of the River Beal, triggering its development as the main settlement in Butterworth. Milnrow was primarily agricultural and rural during the Middle Ages, and its population did not increase much until the dawn of the woollen trade in the 17th century.

With the development of packhorse routes to emerging woollen markets in Yorkshire, the inhabitants of Milnrow adopted the domestic system, supplementing their income by fellmongering and producing flannel in their weavers' cottages. Coal mining and metalworking also flourished in the Early Modern period, and the farmers, colliers and weavers formed a "close-knit population of independent-minded workers". The hamlets of Butterworth coalesced around the commercial and ecclesiastical centre in Milnrow as demand for the area's flannel grew. In the 19th century, the Industrial Revolution supplanted domestic woollen industries and converted the area into a mill town, with cotton spinning as the principal industry. Mass-produced textile goods from Milnrow's cotton mills were exported globally with the arrival of the railway in 1863. The Milnrow Urban District was established in 1894 and was governed by the district council until its abolition in 1974.

Deindustrialisation and suburbanisation occurred throughout the 20th century resulting in the loss of coal mining and cotton spinning. Milnrow was merged in to the Metropolitan Borough of Rochdale in 1974, and has since become suburban to Rochdale. However, the area has retained "a distinct and separate character", and has been described as "the centre of the south Lancashire dialect". John Collier (who wrote under the pseudonym of Tim Bobbin) is acclaimed as an 18th-century caricaturist and satirical poet who produced Lancashire-dialect works during his time as Milnrow's schoolmaster. Rochdale-born poet Edwin Waugh was influenced by Collier's work, and wrote an extensive account of Milnrow during the mid-19th century in a tribute to him. Milnrow has continued to grow in the 21st century, spurred by its connectivity to road, rail and motorway networks. Surviving weavers' cottages are among Milnrow's listed buildings, while the Ellenroad Steam Museum operates as an industrial heritage centre.

Milnrow tram stop

Milnrow is a tram stop on the Oldham and Rochdale Line (ORL) of Greater Manchester's light-rail Metrolink system. It opened to passengers on 28 February 2013 and is located in Milnrow, a part of the Metropolitan Borough of Rochdale, England.

The station sits on the site of Milnrow railway station, a regional rail station which opened on 2 November 1863 and closed on 3 October 2009 for conversion from heavy rail to light rail. It was along the Oldham Loop Line, which operated from Manchester to Rochdale via Oldham and thus was almost identical to the current Metrolink route.

Newbold tram stop

Newbold is a tram stop on the Oldham and Rochdale Line (ORL) of Greater Manchester's Metrolink network. It is located in the Newbold area of Rochdale, in the Metropolitan Borough of Rochdale, between the Kingsway and Rochdale Railway stations. It opened as part of Phase 3a of the system's expansion, on 28 February 2013.

Newhey tram stop

Newhey is a tram stop on the Oldham and Rochdale Line (ORL) of Greater Manchester's light-rail Metrolink system. It opened to passengers on 28 February 2013 and is located in Newhey, a suburban village the Metropolitan Borough of Rochdale, England.

The stop sits on the site of New Hey railway station, a regional rail station which opened on 2 November 1863 and closed on 3 October 2009 for conversion from heavy rail to light rail. It was along the Oldham Loop Line, which operated from Manchester to Rochdale via Oldham and thus was almost identical to the current Metrolink route.

Piethorne Brook

Piethorne Brook is a watercourse in Greater Manchester. It is a tributary of the River Beal.

River Beal

The Beal is a small river in Greater Manchester, England, and is a tributary of the River Roch. It rises in the Beal Valley in green space between Sholver and Royton, before continuing northwards through Shaw and Crompton, Newhey, Milnrow and Belfield.

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