New Zealand military ranks

New Zealand military ranks are largely based on those of the United Kingdom. The three forces (army, navy, and air force) have their own rank structure, with a rank equivalency that allows seamless interoperability between the services. All three services form part of the New Zealand Defence Force.

Commissioned officers

Naval Ensign of New Zealand
Navy
Crest of the New Zealand Army
Army
Nzairforce.jpg
Air force
Notes
Admiral of the fleet Field marshal Marshal of the air force The Duke of Edinburgh and the Prince of Wales are the only current admiral of the fleet, field marshal and marshal of the RNZAF.
Vice admiral (VADM) Lieutenant general (LTGEN) Air marshal (AM) Rank held by the currently serving Chief of Defence Force; therefore only one of the services will have this grade filled at any one time. Highest ordinary rank of New Zealand Defence Force personnel.
Rear admiral (RADM) Major general (MAJGEN) Air vice-marshal (AVM) Held by the Vice Chief of Defence Force, Commander Joint Forces New Zealand, and the Chiefs of Army, Navy and Air Force. Others holding this rank would be in specialised (United Nations or other coalition) postings.
Commodore (CDRE) Brigadier (BRIG) Air commodore (AIRCDRE)
Captain (CAPT) Colonel (COL) Group captain (GPCAPT)
Commander (CDR) Lieutenant colonel (LTCOL) Wing commander (WGCDR)
Lieutenant commander (LT CDR) Major (MAJ) Squadron leader (SQNLDR)
Lieutenant (LT) Captain (CAPT) Flight lieutenant (FLTLT)
Sub lieutenant (SLT) Lieutenant (LT) Flying officer (FGOFF)
Ensign (ENS) Second lieutenant (2LT) Pilot officer (PLTOFF)
Midshipman (MID) Officer cadet (OCDT) Officer cadet (OCDT) The rank of midshipman is recognised as a commissioned rank, the rank of officer cadet in the army and air force is not, and used only for the purposes of training.

Rank insignias

The rank insignia for commissioned officers for the navy, army, and air force respectively.

Equivalent
NATO code
OF-10 OF-9 OF-8 OF-7 OF-6 OF-5 OF-4 OF-3 OF-2 OF-1 OF(D) and student officer
New Zealand New Zealand
(Edit)
Admiral of the Fleet

Admiral of the fleet
No equivalent Vice Admiral

Vice admiral
Rear Admiral

Rear admiral
Commodore

Commodore
Captain

Captain
Commander

Commander
Lieutenant Commander

Lieutenant commander
Lieutenant

Lieutenant
Sub Lieutenant

Sub lieutenant
Ensign

Ensign
None.svg
Admiral of the fleet Vice admiral Rear admiral Commodore Captain Commander Lieutenant commander Lieutenant Sub lieutenant Ensign Midshipman
New Zealand New Zealand
(Edit)
Field marshal
No equivalent Lieutenant-general Major-general Brigadier Colonel Lieutenant-colonel Major Captain Lieutenant Second lieutenant Various
Field marshal Lieutenant-general Major-general Brigadier Colonel Lieutenant-colonel Major Captain Lieutenant Second lieutenant Officer cadet
New Zealand New Zealand
(Edit)
Marshal of the RNZAF No equivalent Air marshal Air vice-marshal Air commodore Group captain Wing commander Squadron leader Flight lieutenant Flying officer Pilot officer None.svg
Marshal of the RNZAF Air marshal Air vice-marshal Air commodore Group captain Wing commander Squadron leader Flight lieutenant Flying officer Pilot officer Officer cadet
Equivalent
NATO code
OF-10 OF-9 OF-8 OF-7 OF-6 OF-5 OF-4 OF-3 OF-2 OF-1 OF(D) and student officer

Non-commissioned personnel

Naval Ensign of New Zealand
Navy
Crest of the New Zealand Army
Army
Nzairforce.jpg
Air force
Notes
Warrant officer (WO---) Warrant officer class one (WO1) Warrant officer (WO) The sergeant major of the army (SM of A) is a WO1, whereas sergeant majors at unit level are WO2s. Army RSMs (regimental sergeant majors) are also WO1s. The RNZAF introduced command warrant officers around 2009.[1]
Warrant officer class two (WO2) While RSMs are WO1s, CSMs (company sergeant majors) and BSMs (battery sergeant majors in the artillery) are WO2s.
Chief petty officer (CPO---) Staff sergeant (SSGT) Flight sergeant (F/S)
Petty officer (PO---) Sergeant (SGT) Sergeant (SGT)
Leading hand (L---) Bombardier/corporal (BDR/CPL) Corporal (CPL) Army personnel in artillery units use the rank of bombardier (BDR) in place of corporal
Lance bombardier/lance corporal (LBDR/LCPL)
Able rate (A---) Leading aircraftsman (LAC) No army equivalent position of a promotion based on skill without delegation of duties and official responsibilities.
Ordinary rate (O---) Gunner / Trooper / Sapper / Signaller / Private (PTE) Aircraftsman (AC) Trade-related terms are interchanged with the rank of private for army soldiers. These are: gunner (GNR), trooper (TPR), sapper (SPR), and signaller (SIG).

Note: naval enlisted personnel are referred to by both rank and trade. Thus a sailor employed as a chef would hold the rank of ordinary chef (OCH) (with a few exceptions); a warrant officer with a trade of weapon technician would hold the rank of warrant officer weapon technician (WOWT).

Rank insignias

The rank insignia for enlisted personnel for the navy, army, and air force respectively.

Equivalent
NATO code
OR-9 OR-8 OR-7 OR-6 OR-5 OR-4 OR-3 OR-2 OR-1
New Zealand New Zealand
(Edit)
Warrant officer No equivalent Chief petty officer Petty officer No equivalent Leading hand No equivalent Able rate Ordinary rate
Warrant officer Chief petty officer Petty officer Leading hand Able rate Ordinary rate
New Zealand New Zealand
(Edit)
Warrant officer class 1 Warrant officer class 2 (sergeant major) Staff sergeant Sergeant No equivalent Bombardier/corporal Lance bombardier/lance corporal No equivalent Gunner/trooper/private/signaller
Warrant officer class 1 Warrant officer class 2 Staff sergeant Sergeant Corporal Lance corporal Private
(or equivalent)
New Zealand New Zealand
(Edit)
Warrant officer No equivalent Flight sergeant Sergeant No equivalent Corporal No equivalent Leading aircraftsman Aircraftsman
Warrant officer Flight sergeant Sergeant Corporal Leading aircraftsman Aircraftsman
Equivalent
NATO Code
OR-9 OR-8 OR-7 OR-6 OR-5 OR-4 OR-3 OR-2 OR-1

Definitions

Non-commissioned officer

A non-commissioned officer is defined as:

"(a) In relation to the navy, a rating of warrant officer, chief petty officer, petty officer, or leading rank; and includes—
(i) A non-commissioned officer of the army or the air force attached to the navy; and
(ii) A person duly attached or lent as a non-commissioned officer to or seconded for service or appointed for duty as a non-commissioned officer with the navy:
(b) In relation to the army, a soldier above the rank of private but below the rank of officer cadet; and includes a warrant officer; and also includes—
(i) A non-commissioned officer of the navy or the air force attached to the army; and
(ii) A person duly attached or lent as a non-commissioned officer to or seconded for service or appointed for duty as a non-commissioned officer with the army:
(c) In relation to the air force, an airman above the rank of leading aircraftman but below the rank of officer cadet; and includes a warrant officer; and also includes—
(i) A non-commissioned officer of the navy or the army attached to the air force; and
(ii) A person duly attached or lent as a non-commissioned officer to or seconded for service or appointed for duty as a non-commissioned officer with the air force:" — Defence Act 1990, Sect 2 (Interpretation)[1]

Commissioned officers

Officers of the New Zealand Defence Force are commissioned by the governor general on behalf of the New Zealand Sovereign, Queen Elizabeth II. See also Officer (armed forces). Salutes rendered to officers by junior officers and enlisted personnel are indirect salutes to the sovereign, based on the officer holding the monarch's authority.

Higher flag ranks and ceremonial ranks

Appointments to the most senior ranks (those above the rank held by the chief of the defence force, usually lieutenant general or equivalent) are ceremonial, for the head of state and members of the royal family.

External links

References

  1. ^ http://www.airforce.mil.nz/about-us/news/airforce-news/archive/105/profiles.htm
List of comparative military ranks

This article is a list of various states' armed forces ranking designations. Comparisons are made between the different systems used by nations to categorize the hierarchy of an armed force compared to another. Several of these lists mention NATO reference codes. These are the NATO rank reference codes, used for easy comparison among NATO countries. Links to comparison charts can be found below.

New Zealand Army

The New Zealand Army (Māori: Ngāti Tūmatauenga, "Tribe of the God of War") is the land component of the New Zealand Defence Force and comprises around 4,500 Regular Force personnel, 2,000 Territorial Force personnel and 500 civilians. Formerly the New Zealand Military Forces, the current name was adopted by the New Zealand Army Act 1950. The New Zealand Army traces its history from settler militia raised in 1845.New Zealand soldiers served with distinction in the major conflicts in the 20th century, including the Second Boer War, World War I, World War II, the Korean War, the Malayan Emergency, Borneo Confrontation and the Vietnam War. Since the 1970s, deployments have tended to be assistance to multilateral peacekeeping efforts. Considering the small size of the force, operational commitments have remained high since the start of the East Timor deployment in 1999. New Zealand personnel also served in the First Gulf War, Iraq and Afghanistan, as well as several UN and other peacekeeping missions including the Regional Assistance Mission to Solomon Islands, the Sinai, South Sudan and Sudan.

New Zealand Defence College

The New Zealand Command and Staff College (NZCSC) is the premier educational institute for the New Zealand Defence Force (NZDF) and is located at Trentham Military Camp, Upper Hutt (near Wellington). The New Zealand Command and Staff College provides professional military education to New Zealand Defence Force officers which prepares officers for command and staff appointments. The College was established at Whenuapai, near Auckland, in 1950, as a school for junior officers of the RNZAF. In 2004, the College moved to its present location in Trentham Military Camp, Upper Hutt near Wellington, New Zealand. Courses follow a modular approach that incorporate the following core subjects: Communication Skills, Operational Studies, Strategic Studies, International Relations, Command, Leadership and Management. Due to the College's close association with Massey University, it is able to offer to successful graduates of the Advanced Command and Staff Course (Joint) the delivery, by Massey University's Centre for Defence and Security Studies, of 150 credits of the 180 credits required for gaining a Masters in International Security.The NZCSC delivers military education course to all three Services of the New Zealand Defence Force. In addition to producing a professional military development framework for the NZDF and delivering various short courses in law of armed conflict (LOAC) and Joint Operations Planning Course (JOPC), the College runs three main courses. These include the Advanced Command and Staff Course (Joint), the Intermediate Command and Staff Course (Joint) and the Joint Warrant Officers Advanced Course.

New Zealand Defence Force

The New Zealand Defence Force (Māori: Te Ope Kātua o Aotearoa, "Line of Defence of New Zealand") consists of three services: the New Zealand Army, the Royal New Zealand Air Force and the Royal New Zealand Navy; and is commanded and headed by the Chief of Defence Force (CDF).

As of 2018 the Commander-in-Chief of the NZDF, Dame Patsy Reddy, Governor-General of New Zealand, exercises power on the advice of the Minister of Defence, Ron Mark, under the Defence Act 1990. A previous Chief of Defence Force (2014-2018), Lieutenant General Tim Keating, had previously served in the capacity of Vice Chief of Defence Force, and was appointed to the top position on 31 January 2014. Mark was appointed Minister of Defence as a member of the Labour-NZ First government following the 2017 New Zealand general election, replacing the former Minister of Defence, Mark Mitchell.

Air Marshal Kevin Short took over as Chief of Defence Force on 1 July 2018. The NZDF has announced that Air Vice-Marshal Tony Davies will serve as the next Vice Chief of Defence Force.New Zealand's armed forces have three defence-policy objectives:

to defend New Zealand against low-level threats

to contribute to regional security

to play a part in global security effortsNew Zealand regards its own national defence needs as modest, due to its geographical isolation and benign relationships with neighbours. As of September 2017 the NZDF had 302 personnel deployed overseas on operations and on UN missions in the South Pacific, Asia, Africa, Antarctica and the Middle East areas.

Outline of New Zealand

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to New Zealand:

New Zealand is an island nation located in the western South Pacific Ocean comprising two large islands, the North Island and the South Island, and numerous smaller islands, most notably Stewart Island/Rakiura and the Chatham Islands. The indigenous Māori originally called the North Island Aotearoa, commonly translated into English as "The Land of the Long White Cloud"; "Aotearoa" is now used as the Maori language name for the entire country.New Zealand is situated about 2,000 km (1,200 mi) southeast of Australia across the Tasman Sea, its closest neighbours to the north being New Caledonia, Fiji and Tonga. Because of its remoteness, it was one of the last lands to be settled by humans. During its long period of isolation, New Zealand developed a distinct biodiversity of animal, fungal and plant life. The country's varied topography and its sharp mountain peaks, such as the Southern Alps, owe much to the tectonic uplift of land and volcanic eruptions. New Zealand's capital city is Wellington, while its most populous city is Auckland.

The population is mostly of European descent, with the indigenous Māori being the largest minority. Asians and non-Māori Pacific Islanders are also significant minorities, especially in the cities. Elizabeth II, as the Queen of New Zealand, is the head of state and, in her absence, is represented by a non-partisan governor-general. Political power is held by the democratically elected New Zealand Parliament under the leadership of the Prime Minister, who is the head of government. The Realm of New Zealand also includes the Cook Islands and Niue, which are self-governing but in free association; Tokelau; and the Ross Dependency (New Zealand's territorial claim in Antarctica).

Royal New Zealand Navy

The Royal New Zealand Navy (RNZN; Māori: Te Taua Moana o Aotearoa, "Warriors of the Sea of New Zealand") is the maritime arm of the New Zealand Defence Force. The fleet currently consists of ten ships and eight naval helicopters.

Military ranks and insignia by country
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