New York Yankees (AAFC)

The New York Yankees were a professional American football team that played in the All-America Football Conference (AAFC) from 1946 to 1949. The team played in Yankee Stadium in the Bronx and often played in front of sold-out crowds. They were owned by Dan Topping, who transferred the team from the NFL Brooklyn Dodgers, retaining many of the same players. The team's coach was Ray Flaherty, who had coached the Washington Redskins in the early 1940s.

The Yankees appeared in the 1946 AAFC championship game, but lost to the Cleveland Browns by a score of 14–9. The same two teams appeared in the championship game the following year, with the Browns winning again 14–3.

Before the 1949 season, the Brooklyn Dodgers football team folded and merged into the Yankees, which became the Brooklyn-New York Yankees, but this was the final season of the AAFC, which was then absorbed by the NFL. The Yankees players were divided between the New York Giants and New York Bulldogs, who played as the New York Yanks starting in 1950.

New York Yankees
Founded1946
Folded1949 (merged with BKN in 1949)
Based inNew York, New York, United States
LeagueAll-America Football Conference (1946–1949)
Team historyNew York Yankees (1946–1949)
Team colorsBlue, White, Silver[1]               
Head coachesRay Flaherty (1946–1949)
Owner(s)Dan Topping
AAFC Championship wins0
Home field(s)Yankee Stadium

Players of note

Season records

Season W L T Finish Playoff results
New York Yankees
1946 10 3 1 1st AAFC East Lost to Cleveland, 14–9, in AAFC Championship Game
1947 11 2 1 1st AAFC East Lost to Cleveland, 14–3, in AAFC Championship Game
1948 6 8 0 3rd AAFC East Did Not Qualify
Brooklyn-New York Yankees
1949 8 4 0 3rd AAFC Lost to San Francisco, 17–7, in AAFC Semifinal Playoffs
Totals 35 17 2

References

  1. ^ http://www.gridiron-uniforms.com/images/1946_NYYankees.png
1946 New York Yankees (AAFC) season

The 1946 New York Yankees season was their inaugural season in the All-America Football Conference. The team finished 10-3-1, finishing first in the East Division and qualifying for the playoffs. The team, however, lost to the Cleveland Browns in the AAFC Championship.

1947 New York Yankees (AAFC) season

The 1947 New York Yankees season was their second in the All-America Football Conference. The team improved on their previous output of 10-3-1, winning eleven games. For the second consecutive season, they lost to the Cleveland Browns in the AAFC Championship.

1948 New York Yankees (AAFC) season

The 1948 New York Yankees season was their third in the All-America Football Conference. The team failed to improve on their previous output of 11-2-1, winning only six games. For the first time in three seasons, and the only time in franchise history, they did not qualify for the playoffs.

1949 New York Yankees (AAFC) season

The 1949 New York Yankees season was their fourth and final in the All-America Football Conference. The team improved on their previous output of 6-8, winning eight games. They lost to the San Francisco 49ers in the first round of the playoffs and the team folded with the league after the season.

Arnie Weinmeister

Arnold George Weinmeister (March 23, 1923 – June 29, 2000) was a Canadian-born American and Canadian football defensive tackle. He went to four Pro Bowls, but with only a six-year tenure in the All-America Football Conference and National Football League combined, his career is one of the shortest of any Pro Football Hall of Fame member. He was born in Rhein, Saskatchewan.

Bob Masterson

Robert "Bob" Patrick Masterson (July 23, 1915 – June 29, 1994) was an American football End in the National Football League (NFL). He played six seasons for the Washington Redskins (1938–1943). He played college football at the University of Miami and was drafted in the sixth round of the 1938 NFL Draft by the Chicago Bears. Masterson was inducted into the University of Miami Sports Hall of Fame in 1969.

Buddy Young

Claude Henry K. "Buddy" Young (January 5, 1926 – September 5, 1983) was an American football player and track and field athlete. A native of Chicago, he was Illinois state champ in the 100-yard dash. The 5'4" Young, also known as the "Bronze Bullet", had exceptional quickness and acceleration. He is one of the shortest men ever to play in the National Football League (NFL). As a track star at the University of Illinois, he won the National Collegiate Championships in the 100 and 220-yard dash, tied the world record for the 45 and 60-yard dashes (6.1 in the latter event), and was the Amateur Athletic Union's 100-meter champion.

Clarence "Pug" Manders

Clarence Edward "Pug" Manders (May 5, 1913 – January 13, 1985) was a National Football League running back for the Brooklyn Dodgers/Tigers from 1939 through 1944. He led the NFL in rushing in 1941 and is the younger brother of Jack Manders. His nickname was Pug.

Don Panciera

Donald Matthew Panciera (June 23, 1927 – February 9, 2012) was an American football quarterback, halfback, and defensive back in the All-America Football Conference and the National Football League. He played for the New York Yankees (AAFC), the Detroit Lions, and the Chicago Cardinals. He played college football for the Boston College Eagles and the San Francisco Dons.

Harley McCollum

Harley Raymond McCollum (February 28, 1916 – June 7, 1984) was an American football tackle in the All-America Football Conference for the New York Yankees and Chicago Rockets. He played college football at Tulane University and was drafted in the sixth round of the 1942 NFL Draft by the Washington Redskins.

Joe Signaigo

Joseph Salvatore Signaigo (February 9, 1923 – January 16, 2007) was a professional American football guard in the All-America Football Conference (AAFC) and the National Football League (NFL). He played for the AAFC's New York Yankees (1948–1949) and the NFL's New York Yanks (1950).

Lowell Tew

Lowell William Tew (January 2, 1927 – March 1981) was an American football fullback in the All-America Football Conference for the New York Yankees. He played college football at the University of Alabama and was drafted in the first round (fourth overall) of the 1948 NFL Draft.

Mike Garzoni

Michael John Garzoni (August 19, 1923 – July 18, 2007) was an American football offensive lineman in the National Football League for the Washington Redskins and the New York Giants. He also played for the New York Yankees in the All-America Football Conference. He played college football at Fresno State University and the University of Southern California.

Noble Doss

Noble Webster Doss (May 22, 1920 – February 15, 2009) was an American football halfback who played professionally for the Philadelphia Eagles of the National Football League (NFL) and the New York Yankees of the All-America Football Conference (AAFC). He played college football at Texas.

Otto Schnellbacher

Otto Ole Schnellbacher (April 15, 1923 – March 10, 2008) was an American football defensive back in the National Football League for the New York Giants. He was a 2-time Pro Bowler. Also a professional basketball player, Schnellbacher played for the Basketball Association of America's Providence Steamrollers and St. Louis Bombers in 1948–49. In college, Schnellbacher was a two-sport star at the University of Kansas, earning him the nickname "the double threat from Sublette". On the gridiron, Schnellbacher, along with teammate Ray Evans, was KU's first football All-American in 1947. That same season, Schnellbacher led the Jayhawks to a Big 6 conference title and an Orange Bowl berth. Schnellbacher also excelled in basketball, where he was a four-time first-team all-conference selection (one of only three Jayhawks to do so). He was a member of the 1943 Big Six conference championship team (which also featured All-American teammates Charles B. Black and the aforementioned Ray Evans) that is regarded as one of the program's greatest teams.

Schnellbacher died aged 84, from cancer.

Perry Schwartz

Perry Schwartz (April 27, 1915 – January 4, 2001) was a professional American football end. He played five seasons with the National Football League's Brooklyn Dodgers (1938–1942) and the All-America Football Conference's New York Yankees (1946).

Ray Hare

Raymond Lewis Hare (November 21, 1917 – June 2, 1975) was an American football running back in the National Football League for the Washington Redskins and the Brooklyn Tigers. Hare also played in the All-America Football Conference for the New York Yankees. He attended Gonzaga University.

Spec Sanders

Orban Eugene "Spec" Sanders (January 26, 1919 – July 6, 2003) was an American football running back, quarterback, and punter in the All-America Football Conference (AAFC) and a defensive back in the National Football League (NFL) for the New York Yanks. He was a one-time Pro Bowler in 1950, his final season, when he led the NFL with a then-record-tying 13 interceptions.

Tom Casey (Canadian football)

Thomas R. Casey, better known as Tom "Citation" Casey (July 30, 1924 – October 10, 2002) played for the Winnipeg Blue Bombers of the Western Interprovincial Football Union from 1950 to 1956, during which time he led the league in rushing yards and was named a divisional all-star each year. He was elected into the Canadian Football Hall of Fame in 1964, the first African American to be inducted. He also played one year for the Hamilton Wildcats in 1949. He was named to the All-Time Blue Bomber Greats 75th Anniversary team.

Casey was a practicing medical doctor. Casey attended Hampton University. He was inducted into the Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame and Museum in 1993. Casey died on October 10, 2002.

Casey was the son-in-law of African American entrepreneur Samuel B. Fuller.

New York Yankees (AAFC) seasons

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