New York Daily News

The New York Daily News, officially titled Daily News, is an American newspaper based in New York City. As of May 2016, it was the ninth-most widely circulated daily newspaper in the United States.[5] It was founded in 1919, and was the first U.S. daily printed in tabloid format. It reached its peak circulation in 1947, at 2.4 million copies a day.[6]

Daily News
New York Daily News October 8 2016 cover
Front page of October 8, 2016, with the headline story reporting on the Access Hollywood recordings of Donald Trump.
TypeDaily newspaper
FormatTabloid
Owner(s)Tribune Publishing
EditorRobert York
FoundedJune 26, 1919 (as Illustrated Daily News)
Political alignmentCenter-left,[1] Populist[2][3][4]
Headquarters4 New York Plaza
Manhattan, New York City, US
CountryUnited States
Circulation200,000 Daily (2017)
260,000 Sunday (2017)
OCLC number9541172
Websitenydailynews.com

History

Finest picture front page
February 5, 1921 front page

The Daily News was founded by Joseph Medill Patterson in 1919, as the Illustrated Daily News. (It was not connected to an earlier New York Daily News, which was founded in 1855, flourished under Benjamin Wood, and ceased publication in December 1906.) Patterson and his cousin, Robert R. McCormick were co-publishers of the Chicago Tribune and grandsons of Tribune Company founder Joseph Medill.[7]

When Patterson and McCormick could not agree on the editorial content of the Chicago paper, the two cousins decided at a meeting in Paris that Patterson would work on the project of launching a Tribune-owned newspaper in New York. On his way back, Patterson met with Alfred Harmsworth, who was the Viscount Northcliffe and publisher of the Daily Mirror, London's tabloid newspaper. Impressed with the advantages of a tabloid, Patterson launched the Daily News on June 26, 1919.[7]

The Daily News was not an immediate success, and by August 1919, the paper's circulation had dropped to 26,625.[7] Still, New York's many subway commuters found the tabloid format easier to handle, and readership steadily grew. By the time of the paper's first anniversary in June 1920, circulation was over 100,000 and by 1925, over a million. Circulation reached its peak in 1947, at 2.4 million daily and 4.7 million on Sunday.[8]

The Daily News carried the slogan "New York's Picture Newspaper" from 1920 to 1991, for its emphasis on photographs, and a camera has been part of the newspaper's logo from day one. The paper's later slogan, developed from a 1985 ad campaign, is "New York's Hometown Newspaper", while another has been "The Eyes, the Ears, the Honest Voice of New York". The Daily News continues to include large and prominent photographs, for news, entertainment and sports, as well as intense city news coverage, celebrity gossip, classified ads, comics, a sports section, and an opinion section.

News-gathering operations were, for a time, organized using two-way radios operating on 173.3250 MHz (radio station KEA 871), allowing the assignment desk to communicate with its personnel who utilized a fleet of "radio cars".

Prominent sports cartoonists have included Bill Gallo, Bruce Stark and Ed Murawinski. Columnists have included Walter Kaner. Editorial cartoonists have included C. D. Batchelor.

The paper briefly published a Monday-Friday afternoon counterpart, Daily News Tonight, between August 19, 1980 and August 28, 1981;[9] this competed with the New York Post, which had earlier launched a morning edition to complement its evening newspaper. Occasional "P.M. Editions" were published as extras in 1991, during the brief tenure of Robert Maxwell as publisher.[10]

In 1982, and again in the early 1990s during a newspaper strike, the Daily News almost went out of business. In the 1982 instance, the parent Tribune Company offered the tabloid up for sale. In 1991, millionaire Robert Maxwell offered financial assistance to the News to help it stay in business. When Maxwell died shortly thereafter, the News seceded from his publishing empire, which eventually splintered under questions about whether Maxwell had the financial backing to sustain it. After Maxwell's death in 1991, the paper was held together in bankruptcy by existing management, led by editor James Willse, who became interim publisher after buying the paper from Tribune. Mort Zuckerman bought the paper in 1993.

From its founding until 1991, the Daily News was owned by the Tribune Company. In 1948, the News established WPIX (Channel 11 in New York City), whose call letters were based on the News's nickname of "New York's Picture Newspaper"; and later bought what became WPIX-FM, which is now known as WFAN-FM. The television station became a Tribune property outright in 1991, and remains in the former Daily News Building; the radio station was purchased by Emmis Communications, and since 2014 has been owned by CBS Radio as an FM simulcast of its AM namesake.

The News also maintains local bureaux in the Bronx, Brooklyn, and Queens, at City Hall, within One Police Plaza, and at the various state and federal courthouses in the city.

In January 2012, former News of the World and New York Post editor Colin Myler was appointed editor-in-chief of the Daily News.[11] Myler was replaced by his deputy Jim Rich in September 2015.[12]

On September 4, 2017, tronc, the publishing operations of the former Tribune Company (which had spun out its publishing assets to separate them from its broadcast assets), announced that it had acquired the Daily News.[13] Tronc had bought the Daily News for $1, assuming "operational and pension liabilities". By the time of purchase, circulation had dropped to 200,000 on weekdays and 260,000 on Sundays.[14] In July 2018, tronc fired half of the paper's editorial staff, including the editor-in-chief, Jim Rich. Rich was replaced by Robert York, Publisher and Editor-in-Chief of tronc-owned The Morning Call in Allentown, Pennsylvania.[15] The paper's social media staff were included in the cut; images and memes that were later deleted were posted on its Twitter feed.[16][17]

Editorial stance and style

New York Times journalist Alan Feuer said the Daily News focuses heavily on "deep sourcing and doorstep reporting", providing city-centered "crime reportage and hard-hitting coverage of public issues [...] rather than portraying New York through the partisan divide between liberals and conservatives".[18] According to Feuer, the paper is known for "speaking to and for the city’s working class" and for "its crusades against municipal misconduct".[18]

The New York Times has described the Daily News's editorial stance as "flexibly centrist"[18] with a "high-minded, if populist, legacy".[19] The News endorsed Republican George W. Bush in the 2004 presidential election,[20] Democrat Barack Obama in 2008,[21] Republican Mitt Romney in 2012,[22] and Democrat Hillary Clinton in 2016.[23]

Headquarters

New York Daily News building 1930
Daily News Building, John Mead Howells and Raymond Hood, architects, rendering by Hugh Ferriss. The landmark building housed the paper until the mid-1990s.

From its founding, it was based at 23 Park Place, a block from City Hall, and two blocks from Park Row, the traditional home of the city's newspaper trade. The cramped conditions demanded a much larger space for the growing newspaper.

From 1929 to 1995, the Daily News was based in the landmark skyscraper at 220 East 42nd Street near Second Avenue, designed by John Mead Howells and Raymond Hood. The paper moved to 450 West 33rd Street in 1995, but the 42nd Street location is still known as The News Building and still features a giant globe and weather instruments in its lobby. (It was the model for the Daily Planet building of the first two Superman films). The former News subsidiary WPIX-TV remains in the building.

The third headquarters of the Daily News at 450 West 33rd Street straddled the railroad tracks going into Pennsylvania Station. The building is now the world headquarters of the Associated Press.

In June 2011, the paper moved its operations to two floors at 4 New York Plaza in lower Manhattan.[24] Sixteen months later, the structure was severely damaged and rendered uninhabitable by flooding from Hurricane Sandy. In the immediate aftermath, news operations were conducted remotely from several temporary locations, eventually moving to office space at the Jersey City printing plant.[25] In early 2013, operations moved to rented space at 1290 Avenue of the Americas near Rockefeller Center—just four blocks north of its rival New York Post. The staff returned to the permanent 4 New York Plaza location in early November 2013.

Printing facilities

In 1993, the Daily News consolidated its printing facilities near Liberty State Park in Jersey City, New Jersey.[26][27]

In 2009, the paper spent $150 million on printing presses as part of its move to full color.[28][29]

In 2011, the company spent $100 million to buy three new presses, using a $41.7 million Urban Transit Hub Tax Credit from the State of New Jersey.[30]

Pulitzer Prizes

The Daily News has won eleven Pulitzer Prizes over its history.[31]

In 1998, Daily News columnist Mike McAlary won the Pulitzer Prize for Commentary for his multi-part series of columns (published in 1997) on Abner Louima, who was sodomized and tortured by New York City police officers.[32]

In 2007, the News won the Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Writing for a series of thirteen editorials, published over five months, that detailed how more than 12,000 rescue workers who responded after the September 11 attacks had become ill from toxins in the air.[33] The Pulitzer citation said that the award was given to the paper "for its compassionate and compelling editorials on behalf of Ground Zero workers, whose health problems were neglected by the city and the nation."[33]

In 2017, the Daily News was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Public Service in collaboration with non-profit ProPublica "for uncovering, primarily through the work of reporter Sarah Ryley, widespread abuse of eviction rules by the police to oust hundreds of people, most of them poor minorities."[34]

Noteworthy front pages

In 1928, a News reporter strapped a small camera to his leg, and shot a photo of Ruth Snyder being executed in the electric chair.[35] The next day's newspaper carried the headline "DEAD!".

Ford to City
October 30, 1975, front page

On October 29, 1975, President Gerald Ford gave a speech denying federal assistance to spare New York City from bankruptcy. The front page of the October 30, 1975 Daily News read: “FORD TO CITY: DROP DEAD.”[36] Ford later said the headline had played a role in his losing the 1976 presidential election.[37]

In the year leading up to the 2016 presidential election, the paper's headlines became more provocative, helping to rejuvenate it and, with more opinionated editorials with the aforementioned headlines, once again demonstrate its place in the city's media.[38]

Following the 2015 San Bernardino shooting, in which 14 people were killed, the paper's front page displayed "GOD ISN'T FIXING THIS" along with tweets from Republican politicians offering thoughts and prayers.[39] The paper advocated for tighter gun laws, condemning what it described as "empty platitudes and angry rhetoric" rather than action "in response to the ongoing plague of gun violence in our country."[39][40] The provocative headline[39][40] received both praise and criticism.[41]

On January 2016, after Republican senator and presidential candidate Ted Cruz of Texas disparaged "New York values" in a Republican primary debate, the News responded with a cover page headline reading "DROP DEAD, TED" and showing the Statue of Liberty giving the middle finger.[42]

Controversies

The Daily News supported the Iraq War.[43] On March 14, 2003, six days before the 2003 invasion of Iraq, the Daily News reported "President Bush is targeting an aggressive, dangerous, psychotic dictator who has stockpiled weapons of mass destruction and would use them without compunction. ... With Saddam in power, there can be no peace. One argument you hear raised against war is fear of retaliation: America mustn't upset the terrorists. After 9/11, does this even need to be rebutted? Terrorists have killed thousands of Americans already and thirst for more. Fighting back is a necessity, unless people want the peace of the grave."[44]

On December 20, 2016, Daily News columnist Gersh Kuntzman compared the assassination of the Russian Ambassador to Turkey, Andrei Karlov, to the assassination of Nazi German diplomat Ernst vom Rath by Jewish student Herschel Grynszpan, saying "justice has been served."[45] Russia has demanded an official apology from Daily News.[46]

See also

References

  1. ^ "New York Daily News". Media Bias/Fact Check. MBFC News.
  2. ^ Ginenthal, Charles (2010). Stephen J. Gould & Immanuel Velikovsky - Essays In the Continuing Velikovsky Affair. p. 152. ASIN B019CWCBV2. ...even a populist newspaper like the New York Daily News...
  3. ^ Mahler (April 2005). "What Rupert Wrought". New York Magazine. Retrieved May 1, 2018. ... has stolen from the Daily News the mantle of New York’s populist paper,
  4. ^ Barillas (October 21, 2016). "NY Daily News publishes Trump's 'political obituary'". Washington Examiner. Retrieved May 1, 2018. The typically populist paper has flip-flopped between the major parties
  5. ^ "Top 10 US Daily Newspapers". Cision.
  6. ^ Feuer, Alan (September 27, 2015). "The Daily News Layoffs and Digital Shift May Signal the Tabloid Era's End". New York Times. Retrieved July 31, 2018.
  7. ^ a b c Current Biography 1942, pp. 648–51: "Patterson, Joseph Medill"
  8. ^ "New York Daily News". Company-Histories.com}. Retrieved March 20, 2018.
  9. ^ "Clay Felker, founder of New York magazine, dies at age 82". New York Daily News. July 1, 2008. Retrieved January 26, 2019.
  10. ^ "Daily News publishes last Tonight edition". The New York Times. August 29, 1981. Archived from the original on January 26, 2019. Retrieved January 26, 2019.
  11. ^ Pilkington, Ed, "Former NoW editor Colin Myler takes the helm at New York Daily News", The Guardian, January 4, 2012. Retrieved January 4, 2012.
  12. ^ Pompeo, Joe, "Colin Myler leaving the Daily News; Jim Rich to be new EIC", Politico New York, September 11, 2015. Retrieved December 8, 2015.
  13. ^ Ember, Sydney; Sorkin, Andrew Ross (September 4, 2017). "The Daily News, a Distinctive Voice in New York, Is Sold". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 5, 2017.
  14. ^ Kogan, Rick; Channick, Robert (September 5, 2017). "Tronc acquires New York Daily News". Chicago Tribune. Archived from the original on June 17, 2018. Retrieved September 5, 2017.
  15. ^ Folkenflik, David (July 23, 2018). "Tronc Slashes 'New York Daily News' Staff By Half".
  16. ^ "New York Daily News". Twitter. July 23, 2018. Archived from the original on July 23, 2018. Retrieved July 23, 2018.
  17. ^ "New York Daily News cuts half of its newsroom staff". The Guardian, from Associated Press. July 24, 2018.
  18. ^ a b c Feuer, Alan (September 27, 2015). "The Daily News Layoffs and Digital Shift May Signal the Tabloid Era's End". The New York Times. Unlike The New York Post, which has veered from left to right, the politics of The Daily News are flexibly centrist..
  19. ^ Mahler, Jonathan (January 29, 2016). "Drop Dead? Not the Newly Relevant Daily News". The New York Times.
  20. ^ "NY 'Daily News' Endorses Obama — Had Backed Bush in 2004 —and So Does 'Detroit Free Press']". Editor & Publisher. October 18, 2008.
  21. ^ "Daily News endorses Obama for President: He has the promise to renew America at home and abroad". Daily News. October 19, 2008.
  22. ^ "Our choice for America's future: The Daily News endorses Mitt Romney for president". Daily News (New York). November 4, 2012. Retrieved July 31, 2016.
  23. ^ "Daily News Editorial Board says Vote Hillary Clinton: She's the best choice for President, while Donald Trump represents a clear and present danger to the republic". Daily News. July 28, 2016.
  24. ^ Deichler, Andrew. "Daily News Relocating HQ to 4 New York Plaza".
  25. ^ Myler, Colin (November 5, 2012). "How the Daily News bested Superstorm Sandy: The Daily Planet would be proud". Daily News. Retrieved July 25, 2013.
  26. ^ Pinder, Jeanne B. (June 4, 1993). "Daily News to Shift Printing to Jersey City". The New York Times. Retrieved December 16, 2011.
  27. ^ "Fire damages Daily News printing plant in Jersey City". The Jersey Journal. January 5, 2008. Retrieved December 16, 2011.
  28. ^ Pérez-Peña, Richard (November 17, 2009). "With New Presses, Daily News Is Betting on World of Print". The New York Times.
  29. ^ Erin Carlson (November 17, 2009). "The Daily News Spends $150 Million On New Printing Presses". Business Insider. Archived from the original on February 21, 2013. Retrieved November 8, 2012.
  30. ^ O'Dea, Coleen (December 12, 2011). "Can Urban Transit Hubs Help Revitalize New Jersey's Cities?". Jersey City Independent. Retrieved December 16, 2011. ... state expects to award the first $41.7 million in credits soon to the Daily News, which is spending $100 million on three new presses at its site in Jersey City.
  31. ^ Slattery, Denis (April 10, 2017). "Daily News, ProPublica win Pulitzer Prize". New York Daily News. Archived from the original on May 17, 2018. Retrieved July 23, 2018.
  32. ^ McAlary, Mike (August 13, 2007). "Mike McAlary's 1997 Pulitzer Prize-winning Abner Louima columns". New York Daily News. Archived from the original on April 29, 2018. Retrieved July 23, 2018.
  33. ^ a b Saltonstall, David (April 16, 2007). "Daily News editorial board wins Pulitzer". Daily News. Archived from the original on June 12, 2018. Retrieved July 23, 2018.
  34. ^ "Public Service". Pulitzer.org.
  35. ^ "HistoryWired: A Few of Our Favorite Things". SI.edu. Retrieved January 4, 2017.
  36. ^ Infamous 'Drop Dead' Was Never Said by Ford New York Times. December 28, 2006.
  37. ^ Peiser, Jaclyn (July 23, 2018). "Daily News Newsroom Cut in Half by Tronc as Top Editor Is Ousted". New York Times. Retrieved July 31, 2018.
  38. ^ "Drop Dead? Not the Newly Relevant Daily News". New York Times.
  39. ^ a b c Chris Cillizza, The New York Daily News’s very provocative front page on the San Bernardino shooting, Washington Post (December 2, 2015).
  40. ^ a b Jessica Durando, Daily News' provokes with cover on Calif. shooting: 'God isn't fixing this', USA Today (December 3, 2015).
  41. ^ Ginger Adams Otis, Daily News cover calling out pols' empty rhetoric after San Bernardino shooting prompts strong responses, New York Daily News (December 3, 2015).
  42. ^ David Wright, New York Daily News to Cruz: 'Drop Dead, Ted', CNN (January 16, 2016).
  43. ^ "Surprise! Ten Years Ago Many Top Newspapers Did Oppose the US War Against Iraq". The Nation. March 13, 2013.
  44. ^ "Peaceniks couldn't be more wrong". New York Daily News. March 14, 2003. Archived from the original on July 18, 2018. Retrieved July 23, 2018.
  45. ^ Kuntzman, Gersh (December 20, 2016). "Assassination of Russian Ambassador Andrei Karlov was not terrorism, but retribution for Vladimir Putin's war crimes". New York Daily News. Archived from the original on July 18, 2018. Retrieved July 23, 2018.
  46. ^ "Russian Foreign Ministry demands apology from NY Daily News – spokesperson". RT. December 22, 2016.

External links

1949 All-Pro Team

The 1949 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1949 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the Associated Press (AP), the United Press (UP), and the New York Daily News.

1950 All-Pro Team

The 1950 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1950 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the Associated Press (AP), the United Press (UP), and the New York Daily News.

1959 All-Pro Team

Selectors of All-Pros for the 1959 National Football League season included the Associated Press (AP), United Press International (UPI), New York Daily News (NYDN), Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), and The Sporting News (SN).

Bonanno crime family

The Bonanno crime family (pronounced [boˈnanno]) is one of the "Five Families" that dominate organized crime activities in New York City, and in the United States, as part of the criminal phenomenon known as the American Mafia (or Cosa Nostra).

Under the leadership of Joseph Bonanno, the family was one of the most powerful in the country for over 30 years. However, in the early 1960s, Bonanno attempted to seize the mantle of boss of bosses and failed and was forced to retire. This touched off a period of turmoil within the family that lasted almost a quarter of a century. That infighting, allegations that the family was actively dealing heroin, and the infiltration of their ranks by an FBI agent calling himself Donnie Brasco, led them to become the first of the New York families to be kicked off the Commission (a council of the bosses that helps to maintain order in the Mafia). Later, they faced shaky leadership, with the acting boss Carmine Galante murdered in 1979 at the command of Philip Rastelli, the actual boss. The family only recovered in the 1990s under Joseph Massino, and by the dawn of the new millennium was not only back on the Commission, but also was the most powerful family in New York. However, in the early 2000s, a rash of convictions and defections culminated in Massino himself becoming a government informant. The Bonanno family were seen as the most brutal crime family out of the New York five families during the 20th century.

Colombo crime family

The Colombo crime family (pronounced [koˈlombo]) is the youngest of the "Five Families" that dominates organized crime activities in New York City, United States, within the nationwide criminal organization known as the Mafia (or Cosa Nostra). It was during Lucky Luciano's organization of the American Mafia after the Castellammarese War, and the assassinations of Giuseppe "Joe The Boss" Masseria and Salvatore Maranzano, that the gang run by Joseph Profaci was recognized as the Profaci crime family.

The family traces its roots to a bootlegging gang formed by Joseph Profaci in 1928. Profaci would rule his family without interruption or challenge until the late 1950s. The family has been torn by three internal wars. The first war took place during the late 1950s when capo Joe Gallo revolted against Profaci, but it lost momentum in the early 1960s when Gallo was arrested and Profaci died of cancer. The family was not reunited until the early 1960s under Joseph Colombo. In 1971, the second family war began after Gallo's release from prison and the shooting of Colombo. Colombo supporters led by Carmine Persico won the second war after the exiling of the remaining Gallo crew to the Genovese family in 1975. The family would then enjoy over 15 years of peace under Persico and his string of acting bosses.

In 1991, the third and bloodiest war erupted when acting boss Victor Orena tried to seize power from the imprisoned Carmine Persico. The family split into factions loyal to Orena and Persico, and two years of mayhem ensued. It ended in 1993, with 12 family members dead and Orena imprisoned, leaving Persico the winner more or less by default. He was left with a family decimated by war. Persico continued to run the family until his death in 2019, but it has never recovered from the war. In the 2000s, the family was further crippled by multiple convictions in federal racketeering cases and numerous members becoming government witnesses. Many levels of law enforcement believe that the Colombo crime family is the weakest of the Five Families of New York City.

Derek Jeter

Derek Sanderson Jeter ( JEE-tər; born June 26, 1974) is an American former professional baseball shortstop, businessman, and baseball executive. He has been the chief executive officer (CEO) and part owner of the Miami Marlins of Major League Baseball (MLB) since September 2017.

As a shortstop, Jeter spent his entire 20-year MLB playing career with the New York Yankees. A five-time World Series champion, Jeter is regarded as one of the primary contributors to the Yankees' success of the late 1990s and early 2000s for his hitting, baserunning, fielding, and leadership. He is the Yankees' all-time career leader in hits (3,465), doubles (544), games played (2,747), stolen bases (358), times on base (4,716), plate appearances (12,602) and at bats (11,195). His accolades include 14 All-Star selections, five Gold Glove Awards, five Silver Slugger Awards, two Hank Aaron Awards, and a Roberto Clemente Award. Jeter was the 28th player to reach 3,000 hits and finished his career ranked sixth in MLB history in career hits and first among shortstops. In 2017, the Yankees retired his uniform number 2.

The Yankees drafted Jeter out of high school in 1992, and he debuted in the major leagues at age 21 in 1995. The following year, he became the Yankees' starting shortstop, won the Rookie of the Year Award, and helped push the team to win the 1996 World Series. Jeter continued to play during the team's championship seasons of 1998–2000; he finished third in voting for the American League (AL) Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award in 1998, recorded multiple career-high numbers in 1999, and won both the All-Star Game MVP and World Series MVP Awards in 2000. He consistently placed among the AL leaders in hits and runs scored for most of his career, and served as the Yankees' team captain from 2003 until his retirement in 2014. Throughout his career, Jeter contributed reliably to the Yankees' franchise successes. He holds many postseason records, and has a .321 batting average in the World Series. Jeter earned the nicknames of "Captain Clutch" and "Mr. November" due to his outstanding play in the postseason.

Jeter was one of the most heavily marketed athletes of his generation and is involved in numerous product endorsements. As a celebrity, his personal life and relationships with other celebrities has drawn the attention of the media.

Fintan O'Toole

Fintan O'Toole (born 1958) is an Irish columnist, literary editor and drama critic for The Irish Times, for which he has written since 1988. O'Toole was drama critic for the New York Daily News from 1997 to 2001 and is a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books. He is an author, literary critic, historical writer and political commentator, with generally left-wing views. His recent books have focused on the rise, fall and aftermath of Ireland's Celtic Tiger. He has been a strong critic of political corruption in Ireland throughout his career.

O'Toole was born in Dublin, grew up in a working-class family, and was educated at University College Dublin.In 2011 he was named by The Observer as one of "Britain's top 300 intellectuals", although he does not live in the UK and was one of five on the list who would not claim to be British. In 2012 and 2013 O'Toole was a Visiting Lecturer in Irish Letters at Princeton University, and contributed to the Fund for Irish Studies Series.

Gambino crime family

The Gambino crime family (pronounced [ɡamˈbiːno]) is one of the "Five Families" that dominate organized crime activities in New York City, United States, within the nationwide criminal phenomenon known as the Mafia (or Cosa Nostra). The group, which went through five bosses between 1910 and 1957, is named after Carlo Gambino, boss of the family at the time of the McClellan hearings in 1963, when the structure of organized crime first gained public attention. The group's operations extend from New York and the eastern seaboard to California. Its illicit activities include labor and construction racketeering, gambling, loansharking, extortion, money laundering, prostitution, fraud, hijacking, pier thefts, and fencing.

The family was one of the five families that were founded in New York after the Castellammarese War of 1931. For most of the next quarter-century, it was a minor player in organized crime. Its most prominent member during this time was its underboss Albert Anastasia, who rose to infamy as the operating head of the underworld's enforcement arm, Murder, Inc. He remained in power even after Murder, Inc. was smashed in the late 1940s, and took over his family in 1951—by all accounts, after murdering the family's founder Vincent Mangano.

The rise of what was the most powerful crime family in America for a time began in 1957, when Anastasia was assassinated while sitting in a barber chair at the Park Sheraton Hotel in Manhattan. Experts believe that Anastasia's underboss Carlo Gambino helped orchestrate the hit to take over the family. Gambino partnered with Meyer Lansky to control gambling interests in Cuba. The family's fortunes grew through 1976, when Gambino appointed his brother-in-law Paul Castellano as boss upon his death. Castellano infuriated upstart capo John Gotti, who orchestrated Castellano's murder in 1985. Gotti's downfall came in 1992, when his underboss Salvatore "Sammy Bull" Gravano decided to cooperate with the FBI. Gravano's cooperation brought down Gotti, along with most of the top members of the Gambino family. Beginning in 2015, the family was headed by Frank Cali until his murder outside his Staten Island home on March 13, 2019.

Genovese crime family

The Genovese crime family (pronounced [dʒenoˈveːze; -eːse]) is one of the "Five Families" that dominate organized crime activities in New York City and New Jersey as part of the Mafia (or Cosa Nostra). The Genovese crime family are rivaled in size only by the Gambino crime family, and are unmatched in terms of power. They have generally maintained a varying degree of influence over many of the smaller mob families outside New York, including ties with the Philadelphia, Patriarca, and Buffalo crime families.

The current "family" was founded by Charles "Lucky" Luciano, and was known as the Luciano crime family from 1931 to 1957, when it was renamed after boss Vito Genovese. Originally in control of the waterfront on the West Side of Manhattan and the Fulton Fish Market, the family was run for years by "the Oddfather", Vincent "the Chin" Gigante, who feigned insanity by shuffling unshaven through New York's Greenwich Village wearing a tattered bath robe and muttering to himself incoherently to avoid prosecution.

The Genovese family is the oldest and the largest of the "Five Families". Finding new ways to make money in the 21st century, the family took advantage of lax due diligence by banks during the housing bubble with a wave of mortgage frauds. Prosecutors say loan shark victims obtained home equity loans to pay off debts to their mob bankers. The family found ways to use new technology to improve on illegal gambling, with customers placing bets through offshore sites via the Internet.

Although the leadership of the Genovese family seemed to have been in limbo after the death of Gigante in 2005, they appear to be the most organized family and remain powerful. Unique in today's Mafia, the family has benefited greatly from members following "Omertà," a code of conduct emphasizing secrecy and non-cooperation with law enforcement and the justice system. While many mobsters from across the country have testified against their crime families since the 1980s, the Genovese family has only had 8 members turn state's evidence in its history.

List of Lucchese crime family mobsters

This article is about current and past members of the Lucchese crime family.

Lucchese crime family

The Lucchese crime family (pronounced [lukˈkeːze]) is one of the "Five Families" that dominate organized crime activities in New York City, United States, within the nationwide criminal phenomenon known as the Mafia (or Cosa Nostra).

The family originated in the early 1920s with Gaetano Reina serving as boss up until his murder in 1930. It was taken over by Tommy Gagliano during the Castellammarese War, and led by him until his death in 1951. The family under Gagliano was peaceful and low key, concentrating their criminal activities in the Bronx, Manhattan and New Jersey. The next boss was Tommy Lucchese who served as Gagliano's underboss for over 20 years, who turned the family around to become one of the most powerful families to sit on the Commission. Lucchese teamed up with Gambino crime family boss Carlo Gambino to control organized crime in New York City. Lucchese had a stronghold on the garment industry in New York and took control of many crime rackets for his crime family. When Lucchese died of a brain tumor in 1967, Carmine Tramunti controlled the family for a brief time; he was arrested in 1973 for funding a major heroin network and died five years later. Anthony Corallo then gained control of the family. Corallo was very secretive and soon became one of the most powerful members of the Commission. He was arrested and convicted in the famous Commission case of 1986.

For most of its history, the Lucchese family was reckoned as one of the most peaceful crime families in the nation. However, that changed when Corallo named Victor Amuso his successor shortly before going to prison. Amuso later promoted one of his longtime partners, Anthony Casso to underboss. Starting with the Windows Case in 1986, they instituted one of the bloodiest reigns in Mafia history, ordering virtually anyone who crossed them to be murdered. It is estimated that Casso himself has murdered between 30-40 people and has ordered over 100 murders during his reign; he was sentenced to 455 years in prison. Casso also had authority over NYPD detectives Louis Eppolito and Stephen Caracappa: both carried out at least 8 murders for him. Amuso was arrested in 1991 and sentenced to life in prison. Several Lucchese wiseguys, fearing for their lives, turned informant. The highest-profile of these was acting boss Alphonse D'Arco, who became the first boss of a New York crime family to testify against the mob. This led to the arrest of the entire Lucchese family hierarchy, with Casso also becoming an informant. Testimony from these informants nearly destroyed the family, with as many as half of its members incarcerated. Amuso has continued to rule the family from prison.

Maggie Haberman

Maggie Lindsy Haberman (born October 30, 1973) is an American journalist. She is a White House correspondent for The New York Times and a political analyst for CNN. She previously worked as a political reporter for The New York Post, the New York Daily News, and Politico.

Michael Mancuso

Michael "The Nose" Mancuso (born 1955) is an American mobster. He is a member of the American Mafia (Cosa Nostra) and the boss of the Bonanno crime family, one of Five Families in New York City.

New York Golden Gloves

The New York Golden Gloves boxing tournament was considered by many boxing aficionados as one of the most elite Golden Gloves titles, along with the Chicago Golden Gloves. Named for the small golden gloves given out to the winners of each weight category, the New York Golden Gloves continued for decades under the sponsorship of the New York Daily News. Originally the tournament was known as "The New York Daily News Welfare Association's Golden Gloves Tournament of Champions" or simply "The New York."

Pete Hamill

Pete Hamill (; born June 24, 1935) is an American journalist, novelist, essayist, editor and educator. Widely traveled and having written on a broad range of topics, he is perhaps best known for his career as a New York City journalist, as "the author of columns that sought to capture the particular flavors of New York City's politics and sports and the particular pathos of its crime." Hamill was a columnist and editor for the New York Post and The New York Daily News.

Rex Reed

Rex Taylor Reed (born October 2, 1938) is an American film critic and former co-host of the syndicated television show At the Movies. He writes the column "On the Town with Rex Reed" for The New York Observer.

S. E. Cupp

Sarah Elizabeth Cupp (born February 23, 1979) is an American television host, political commentator, and writer. In August 2017, she began hosting S.E. Cupp: Unfiltered, a political panel show, co-hosted by Andrew Levy, on HLN and later CNN.

She is a former panelist on the CNN political debate show Crossfire, author of Losing Our Religion: The Liberal Media's Attack on Christianity and co-author of Why You're Wrong About the Right. She was a panelist on Real News on TheBlaze, a co-host of the MSNBC talk show The Cycle, and guest host on Red Eye w/ Greg Gutfeld. She is a frequent guest panelist on Real Time with Bill Maher.

Shaun King

Jeffery Shaun King (born September 17, 1979) is an American writer, civil rights activist, and co-founder of Real Justice PAC and The North Star. King is known for his use of social media to promote social justice causes, including the Black Lives Matter movement.

King was raised in Kentucky and attended Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia. While at Morehouse, King was elected President of the student government association and was awarded the Oprah Winfrey Scholarship.After college, he worked as a high school teacher in Atlanta. He then went on to work as a pastor and founded a church in Atlanta called "Courageous Church." During this time, King launched a number of internet campaigns, such as aHomeinHaiti.org, TwitChange.com, and HopeMob.org.

King is currently a writer-in-residence at Harvard Law School’s Fair Punishment Project and contributes to the Tom Joyner Morning Show, The Intercept and The Appeal. Previously, he contributed to the New York Daily News, Daily Kos, and The Young Turks. In 2018, King co-founded Real Justice PAC, which supports progressive candidates running for district attorney offices, and re-launched Frederick Douglass's The North Star.

WWRL

WWRL (1600 kHz, "Radio Zindagi") is a commercial AM radio station licensed to New York City. Broadcasting from a transmitter site in Secaucus, New Jersey, WWRL airs an Indian and South Asian radio format and is owned by Nimisha and Jeetendra Shukla through licensee NJ Broadcasting, LLC.

Founded in 1926, WWRL originally had a multi-lingual format serving the various ethnic communities of New York City. The station took on a mostly Spanish identity in the 1950s, then became primarily oriented towards African Americans living in New York City in the mid-1960s, under the direction of News Director, Dick London, who invited community leaders to voice their concerns publicly on air, as the station became advocates for legislative change. The music and news advocacy was an integral part of the Black American community. WWRL played R&B music from 1964 to 1982 before changing to gospel music and religious programming from 1982 to 1997.

After a brief return to R&B in the late 1990s, WWRL gradually de-emphasized music in favor of more talk radio programming. In 2006, WWRL replaced WLIB as the flagship station for the Air America Radio network and retained a progressive talk radio format for seven years.

From 2014 to 2016, WWRL had a regional Mexican music format before changing to the current Indian programming.

The Baltimore Sun Media Group
Chicago Tribune Media Group
Daily Press Media Group
Hartford Courant Media
Morning Call Media Group
Orlando Sentinel Media Group
Pilot Media
Sun-Sentinel Media Group
Spanfeller Media Group
Other assets

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.