New Line Cinema

New Line Productions Inc., doing business as New Line Cinema, is an American film production studio of Warner Bros. It was founded in 1967 by Robert Shaye as an independent film distribution company, later becoming a film studio. It was acquired by Turner Broadcasting System in 1994; Turner later merged with Time Warner (now WarnerMedia) in 1996, and New Line was merged with Warner Bros. Pictures in 2008.[3] Currently, its films are distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures.

New Line Productions Inc.
New Line Cinema
Subsidiary
IndustryMotion pictures
Founded1967 (New York City, United States)
FounderRobert Shaye
Headquarters4000 Warner Blvd, ,
United States
Key people
Products
ParentWarner Bros.
Divisions
Footnotes / references
[1][2]

History

New Line Cinema was established in 1967 by the then 27-year-old Robert Shaye as a film distribution company, supplying foreign and art films for college campuses in the United States. Shaye operated New Line's offices out of his apartment at 14th Street and Second Avenue in New York City. One of the company's early successes was its distribution of the 1936 anti-cannabis propaganda film Reefer Madness, which became a cult hit on American college campuses in the early 1970s. New Line also released many classic foreign-language films, like Stay As You Are, Immoral Tales and Get Out Your Handkerchiefs (which became the first New Line film to win an Oscar).[4] The studio has also released many of the films of John Waters.

In 1976, New Line secured funding to produce its first full-length feature, Stunts (1977), directed by Mark Lester. Although not considered a critical success, the film performed well commercially on the international market and on television.[5] New Line then produced or co-produced three more films in 1981 and 1983; Alone in the Dark, Xtro and Polyester, directed by John Waters. Polyester was one of the first films to introduce a novelty cinema experience named Odorama, where members of the audience were provided with a set of "scratch and sniff" cards to be scratched and sniffed at specific times during the film, which provided an additional sensory connection to the viewed image.[5]

A Nightmare on Elm Street was produced and released by New Line in 1984. The resulting franchise was New Line's first commercially successful series after a devastating financial slump, leading the company to be nicknamed "The House that Freddy Built". The film was made on a budget of $1.8 million and grossed over $25.5 million at the United States box office. It was the first film to feature the actor Johnny Depp. A year later, A Nightmare on Elm Street 2: Freddy's Revenge was released, and grossed $3.3 million in its first three days of release and over $30 million at the domestic box office. A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors was released in 1987, and grossed more than any previously released independent film and went on to make almost $45 million at the US box office.[6]

In November 1990, New Line purchased a 52% stake in the television production company RHI Entertainment (now Sonar Entertainment), which would later be sold to Hallmark Cards. In May 1991, New Line purchased the home video and foreign rights to 600 films held by Sultan Entertainment Holdings (aka Nelson Entertainment Group). The deal also included an 11-film distribution deal with Turner subsidiary Castle Rock Entertainment. On November 27, 1991, New Line purchased Sultan outright.[7][8]

On January 28, 1994, New Line Cinema was acquired by the Turner Broadcasting System,[9] which then merged with Time Warner in 1996. New Line Cinema was kept as its own separate entity, while fellow Turner-owned studios Hanna-Barbera Productions and Castle Rock Entertainment eventually became units of Warner Bros. In 2007, New Line Cinema and Castle Rock Entertainment collaborated on the 2007 film Fracture, as their first joint venture since the mid 1990s before both companies were bought by Turner.

During its time as an entity separate from Warner Bros., New Line Cinema operated several divisions, including theatrical distribution, marketing and home video. It was also a partner in founding a new distribution company named Picturehouse in 2005. Specializing in independent film, Picturehouse was formed by Bob Berney, who left distributor Newmarket Films, New Line, who folded their Fine Line division into Picturehouse, and HBO Films, a division of HBO and a subsidiary of Time Warner, who was interested in getting into the theatrical film business. However, on May 8, 2008, it was announced that Picturehouse would shut down in the fall of said year.[10] Berney later bought the Picturehouse trademarks from Warner Bros. and relaunched the company in 2013.[11]

Accounting practices

South Canterbury Finance invested $30 million in The Lord of the Rings film trilogy, only to have New Line produce accounts showing that the movies did not make a profit, but made "horrendous losses". According to SCF CEO Allan Hubbard: "We found it surprising because it was one of the biggest box office success of all time."[12] (The three films rank 7th, 25th, and 33rd on the list of highest-grossing films.) Fifteen actors sued New Line Cinema in June 2007, claiming that they never received their 5% of revenue from merchandise sold in relation to the film, which contained their likenesses.[13]

Peter Jackson's production company Wingnut Films questioned New Line Cinema's accounting methods, bringing in an outside auditor as allowed by the contract, and eventually sued New Line.[14] New Line executive Robert Shaye took great offense and declared that New Line would never work with Jackson again.[15] Saul Zaentz also had an ongoing dispute with New Line Cinema over profits from The Lord of the Rings films. In December 2007, Variety reported that Zaentz was also suing New Line, alleging that the studio refused to make records available so that he could confirm his profit-participation statements were accurate.[16]

Merger with Warner Bros.

On February 28, 2008, Time Warner's CEO at the time, Jeffrey Bewkes, announced that New Line would be shut down as a separately operated studio. Robert Shaye and Michael Lynne said that they would step down with a letter to their employees. They promised, however, along with Time Warner and Jeffery Bewkes, that the company would continue to operate its financing, producing, marketing and distributing operations of its own films, but would do so as a part of Warner Bros. and be a smaller studio, releasing a smaller number of films than in past years.[17] The box office disappointment of The Golden Compass was largely blamed for the decision, in which New Line spent $180 million on its development, yet it only grossed $70 million in the United States market.[18]

New Line moved from its long-time headquarters on Robertson Boulevard in Los Angeles in June 2014 to Warner Bros.' lot Building 76, formerly used by Legendary Entertainment, a former Warner Bros. film co-financier.[19] The last film released by New Line Cinema as a separate company was the Will Ferrell film Semi-Pro.

As for the company's future, Alan Horn, the Warner Bros. president at the time of the consolidation, stated, "There's no budget number required. They'll be doing about six per year, though the number may go from four to seven; it's not going to be 10." As to content, "New Line will not just be doing genre [...] There's no mandate to make a particular kind of movie."[20]

Films

Highest-grossing films

Rank Title Year Domestic gross Notes
1 The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King* 2003 $377,845,905
2 The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers* 2002 $342,551,365
3 It 2017 $327,481,748 Distributed by Warner Bros.; co-production with Vertigo Entertainment, Lin Pictures, KatzSmith Productions and RatPac-Dune Entertainment
4 The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring* 2001 $315,544,750
5 The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey 2012 $303,003,568 Distributed by Warner Bros.; co-production with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures
6 The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug 2013 $258,366,855 Distributed by Warner Bros.; co-production with Warner Bros. and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures
7 The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies 2014 $253,161,689 Distributed by Warner Bros.; co-production with Warner Bros. and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures
8 Rush Hour 2 2001 $226,164,286
9 Austin Powers in Goldmember 2002 $213,307,889
10 Wedding Crashers 2005 $209,255,921
11 Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me 1999 $206,040,086
12 Elf 2003 $173,398,518
13 Straight Outta Compton 2015 $161,197,785 Distributed by Universal Pictures; co-production with Legendary Pictures
14 San Andreas 2015 $155,190,832 Distributed by Warner Bros.; co-production with Village Roadshow Pictures and RatPac-Dune Entertainment
15 Sex and the City 2008 $152,647,258 Distributed by Warner Bros.; co-production with HBO Films
16 We're the Millers 2013 $150,394,119 Distributed by Warner Bros.
17 Rush Hour 1998 $141,186,864
18 Rush Hour 3 2007 $140,125,968
19 The Conjuring 2013 $137,400,141 Distributed by Warner Bros.
20 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 1990 $135,265,915
21 Central Intelligence 2016 $127,440,871 Distributed by Warner Bros.
22 Dumb and Dumber 1994 $127,175,374
23 Mr. Deeds 2002 $126,293,452 studio credit; Distributed by Columbia Pictures
24 The Mask 1994 $119,938,730
25 Hairspray 2007 $118,871,849

*Includes theatrical reissue(s).

See also

References

  1. ^ "Bloomberg - Are you a robot?". www.bloomberg.com.
  2. ^ "Warner Bros. Entertainment Executives". WarnerMedia. Retrieved 19 June 2018.
  3. ^ "History of New Line Cinema, Inc. – FundingUniverse". Fundinguniverse.com. Retrieved January 17, 2016.
  4. ^ Collins, Keith (August 22, 2004). "A brief history". Variety.
  5. ^ a b "New Line Cinema : About Us". Newline.com. Archived from the original on 2012-01-03. Retrieved 2011-08-23.
  6. ^ "New Line Cinema : About Us". Newline.com. Retrieved 2011-08-23.
  7. ^ "Nightmares, Turtles And Profits". Businessweek.com. 1991-09-29. Retrieved 2016-01-17.
  8. ^ "COMPANY CONFORMED NAME: TURNER BROADCASTING SYSTEM INC" (TXT). Sec.gov. Retrieved 2016-01-17.
  9. ^ "New Line to Join Ted Turner Empire Today : Film: With more money, the company is likely to add a few big movies to its annual production schedule". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved August 9, 2012.
  10. ^ Hayes, Dade; McNary, Dave (May 8, 2008). "Picturehouse, WIP to close shop". Variety.
  11. ^ Fleming, Mike (January 15, 2013). "The Berneys are Back with Picturehouse, and Now They've got Metallica". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved 2013-01-15.
  12. ^ Scherer, Karyn (December 13, 2010). "The Hollywood Shell Game". The New Zealand Herald.
  13. ^ "15 actors sue New Line Cinema over 'Lord of the Rings' profits". USA Today. June 6, 2007.
  14. ^ "Director sues over Rings profits". BBC News. March 2, 2005. Retrieved 2007-08-17.
  15. ^ "New Line boss hits out at Peter Jackson". The New Zealand Herald. AFP, NZPA. January 12, 2007. Retrieved October 30, 2011.
  16. ^ Shprintz, Janet (December 13, 2007). "Zaentz, New Line in court". Variety.
  17. ^ Billington, Alex (February 28, 2008). "It's Official – New Line Cinema is Dead!". FirstShowing.net.
  18. ^ "Dial 'D' for disaster: The fall of New Line Cinema". The Independent. London. April 16, 2008.
  19. ^ McNary, Dave (January 30, 2014). "New Line Leaving Longtime Los Angeles HQ, Moving to Burbank". Variety. Retrieved October 30, 2014.
  20. ^ McNary, Dave (June 27, 2008). "New Line still has irons in fire". Variety.

External links

A Nightmare on Elm Street (franchise)

A Nightmare on Elm Street is an American horror franchise that consists of nine slasher films, a television series, novels, and comic books. The films began with the film A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984) created by Wes Craven. The series revolves around the fictional character Freddy Krueger, a former child killer who after being burned alive by the vengeful parents of his victims, returns from the grave to terrorize and kill the teenage residents of Springwood, Ohio in their dreams. The original film was written and directed by Craven, who returned to co-script the second sequel, A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors (1987), and to write and direct New Nightmare (1994). The films collectively grossed over $457 million at the box-office worldwide.

The original film was released in 1984. A series of sequels produced by the independent film company New Line Cinema followed. New Line often attributes the growth of their company to the success of the Nightmare series. The film series as a whole has received mixed reviews by critics, but has been a financial success at the box office. When comparing the United States box office grosses of other American horror film series, A Nightmare on Elm Street is the second highest grossing series in adjusted US dollars. In 1988, a television series was produced with Freddy as the host. The pilot episode focused on the night Freddy was burned alive by the angry parents of the children he had killed, though the rest of the series featured episodes with independent plots. Twelve novels, separate from the adaptations of the films, and multiple comic book series were published featuring Freddy Krueger, as well as a crossover film featuring fellow horror icon Jason Voorhees from the Friday the 13th franchise. A remake of the 1984 film was released in 2010, and a second remake is planned.

Blade (franchise)

Blade is a film and television franchise based on the fictional Marvel Comics character of the same name, portrayed by Wesley Snipes. They were written by David S. Goyer, based on the comics by Marv Wolfman, and Gene Colan. The three films were directed by Stephen Norrington, Guillermo del Toro and Goyer respectively, and distributed by New Line Cinema.

The character was created in 1973 for Marvel Comics by writer Marv Wolfman and artist Gene Colan and was a supporting character in the 1970s comic Tomb of Dracula. In the comic, Blade's mother was bitten by a vampire while she was in labor with Blade.

Final Destination

Final Destination is an American horror franchise composed of five films, comic books and novels. It is based on an unproduced spec script by Jeffrey Reddick, originally written for The X-Files television series, and was distributed by New Line Cinema. All five films center around a small group of people who escape impending death when one individual (the protagonist of each film) has a sudden premonition and warns them that they will all die in a terrible mass-casualty accident. After avoiding their foretold deaths, the survivors are killed one by one in bizarre accidents caused by an unseen force creating complicated chains of cause and effect, resembling Rube Goldberg machines in their complexity.The series is noteworthy among other films in the horror genre in that the antagonist is not a stereotypical slasher or other physical being, but Death personified, subtly manipulating circumstances in the environment with a design on claiming anyone who escapes their fated demise.

In addition to the films, a novel series, which includes the novelizations of the first three films, was published throughout 2005 and 2006 by Black Flame. A one-shot comic book titled Final Destination: Sacrifice was released alongside select DVDs of Final Destination 3 in 2006, and a comic series titled Final Destination: Spring Break was published by Zenescope Entertainment in 2007.

Fine Line Features

Fine Line Features (often spelt as FineLine Features) was the specialty films division of New Line Cinema. From 1991–2005, under founder and president Ira Deutchman, Fine Line acquired, distributed and marketed films of a more "indie" flavor than its parent company, including such critically acclaimed films as Hoop Dreams, The Player, Short Cuts, Night on Earth, Spanking the Monkey, Shine, My Own Private Idaho, Hedwig and the Angry Inch, and Mrs. Parker and the Vicious Circle. In 2005, New Line teamed up with fellow Time Warner subsidiary HBO to form Picturehouse, a new specialty film label of which Fine Line was folded into.

Fine Line Features DVD releases were split between HBO Video and New Line Home Entertainment. When New Line Home Entertainment ceased to exist in 2010, it was folded into Warner Home Video.

It – Chapter Two

It: Chapter Two is an upcoming American supernatural horror film and the sequel to the 2017 film It. Both parts were adapted from the 1986 novel It by Stephen King. The second part is directed by Andy Muschietti and written by Gary Dauberman. Set in 2016, 27 years after the events of 1989 described in the first film, the film stars Bill Skarsgård, who reprises his role as Pennywise. James McAvoy, Jessica Chastain, Jay Ryan, Bill Hader, Isaiah Mustafa, James Ransone, and Andy Bean portray the adult versions of The Losers Club, while Jaeden Lieberher, Sophia Lillis, Jeremy Ray Taylor, Finn Wolfhard, Chosen Jacobs, Jack Dylan Grazer, and Wyatt Oleff return from the first film as the younger Losers, respectively.

Produced by New Line Cinema, Vertigo Entertainment, Rideback and KatzSmith Productions, and distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures, the film is scheduled to be released on September 6, 2019.

Mr. Saturday Night

Mr. Saturday Night is a 1992 American comedy-drama film that marks the directorial debut of its star, Billy Crystal.

It focuses on the rise and fall of Buddy Young Jr., a stand-up comedian. Crystal produced and co-wrote the screenplay with the writing duo Babaloo Mandel and Lowell Ganz. It was filmed from November 1991 to March 1992 and released on September 23, 1992, by Columbia Pictures. Co-star David Paymer received an Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actor.

Picturehouse (company)

Picturehouse is an American film production and distribution company formed in 2005 as a joint venture of New Line Cinema and HBO Films. The company's films include Pan's Labyrinth, La Vie en rose, and The King of Kong.

RatPac-Dune Entertainment

RatPac Entertainment is an American motion picture production and financing company owned by producer-director Brett Ratner and Access Entertainment. RatPac was founded by Ratner and billionaire James Packer. RatPac is a partner in RatPac-Dune Entertainment with Dune Entertainment.

Semi-Pro

Semi-Pro is a 2008 American sports comedy film from New Line Cinema. The film was directed by Kent Alterman and stars Will Ferrell, Woody Harrelson, André Benjamin and Maura Tierney. The film was shot in Los Angeles near Dodger Stadium (in the gym of the Los Angeles City Fire Department Training Center), in Detroit, and in Flint, Michigan. Released in theaters on February 29, 2008 and released on DVD and Blu-ray Disc on June 3, 2008, it was the last film from New Line Cinema before they merged with Warner Bros.

Shaft (2019 film)

Shaft is an upcoming 2019 American action comedy film directed by Tim Story and written by Kenya Barris and Alex Barnow. The film stars Samuel L. Jackson, Jessie Usher, and Richard Roundtree. It will be released theatrically in the United States on June 14, 2019 with a world wide release on Netflix two weeks later. It is the fifth film in the Shaft film series and a sequel to Shaft (2000), however, unlike its predecessor, which was distributed by Paramount Pictures, this film is distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures.

Shazam! (film)

Shazam! is an upcoming American superhero film based on the DC Comics character of the same name. Produced by New Line Cinema, it is intended to be the seventh installment in the DC Extended Universe (DCEU). Directed by David F. Sandberg from a screenplay by Henry Gayden, and a story by Gayden and Darren Lemke, the film is set to star Asher Angel as Billy Batson, a teenage boy who can transform via the magic word "Shazam" into an adult superhero, played by Zachary Levi. Shazam! also features Mark Strong, Jack Dylan Grazer, Grace Fulton, Ian Chen, Jovan Armand, Faithe Herman, Cooper Andrews, Marta Milans and Djimon Hounsou as supporting characters. It will be the first film version of the character since the 1941 serial Adventures of Captain Marvel (the character's original name) and will be the first full-length feature film centered around the character.

Development of a live-action Shazam! film began at New Line in the early 2000s, but languished in development hell for many years. The film went into pre-production in 2008 with director Peter Segal and writer John August, and Dwayne Johnson considered to star as the villain Black Adam, but the project fell through. William Goldman, Alec Sokolow, Joel Cohen, Bill Birch, and Geoff Johns, among others, were all attached to the project as writers at various points. The film was officially announced in 2014, with Johnson attached to star as either Shazam or Black Adam. He would later be cast in January 2017 to lead a solo Black Adam development project. Sandberg signed on to direct Shazam! in February 2017 and Levi was cast that October with Angel joining the following month. Principal photography began in Toronto, Ontario, Canada in January 29, 2018, with most of the film shot at Pinewood Toronto Studios, and wrapped on May 11, 2018.

Shazam! is scheduled for release in the United States by Warner Bros. Pictures in RealD 3D, Dolby Cinema and IMAX 3D on April 5, 2019.

Son of the Mask

Son of the Mask is a 2005 comedy film directed by Lawrence Guterman. The film stars Jamie Kennedy as Tim Avery, an aspiring cartoonist from Fringe City who has just had his first child born with the powers of the Mask. It is the stand-alone sequel to the 1994 film The Mask, an adaptation of Dark Horse Comics which starred Jim Carrey and Cameron Diaz.

It also stars Alan Cumming as the god of mischief, Loki, whom Odin has ordered to find the Mask. It co-stars Traylor Howard, Kal Penn, Steven Wright, Bob Hoskins as Odin, and Ryan and Liam Falconer as Tim's baby Alvey. Ben Stein makes a brief reappearance in the beginning of the film as Dr. Arthur Neuman from The Mask to reestablish the relationship with the mask and Loki. Bill Farmer and Richard Steven Horvitz provide the voice and vocal effects of Masked Otis. The film was panned by critics and became a box office bomb, grossing just $59 million against its $84–100 million budget.

The Lord of the Rings (film series)

The Lord of the Rings is a film series of three epic fantasy adventure films directed by Peter Jackson, based on the novel The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien. The films are subtitled The Fellowship of the Ring (2001), The Two Towers (2002) and The Return of the King (2003). They are a New Zealand-American venture, produced by WingNut Films and The Saul Zaentz Company and distributed by New Line Cinema.

The trilogy was one of the biggest and most ambitious film projects ever undertaken, with a reported budget of $281–330 million. The three films were shot simultaneously and entirely in Jackson's native New Zealand. One in every 160 New Zealanders participated in the production. A special extended edition of each film was released on DVD a year after its theatrical release. While the films follow the book's general storyline, they omit some plot elements and include additions to and deviations from the source material.

Set in the fictional world of Middle-earth, the films follow the hobbit Frodo Baggins (Elijah Wood) as he and the Fellowship embark on a quest to destroy the One Ring, to ensure the destruction of its maker, the Dark Lord Sauron. The Fellowship eventually splits up and Frodo continues the quest with his loyal companion Sam (Sean Astin) and the treacherous Gollum (Andy Serkis). Meanwhile, Aragorn (Viggo Mortensen), heir in exile to the throne of Gondor, along with Legolas, Gimli, Merry, Pippin and the wizard Gandalf (Ian McKellen), unite to rally the Free Peoples of Middle-earth in the War of the Ring.

The series was met with overwhelming praise. It was a major financial success, and is among the highest-grossing film series of all time. Each film was critically acclaimed and heavily awarded, winning 17 out of their 30 Academy Award nominations. The series's final film, The Return of the King, won all 11 of its Academy Award nominations including Best Picture, tying with Ben-Hur (1959) and Titanic (1997) the record for most Academy Awards won by a single film. The series received wide praise for its innovative special and visual effects.

The Mask (film)

The Mask is a 1994 American fantasy superhero comedy film directed by Charles Russell, produced by Bob Engelman, and written by Mike Werb, based on the comic series of the same name published by Dark Horse Comics. The film stars Jim Carrey, Peter Greene, Amy Yasbeck, Peter Riegert, Richard Jeni, Ben Stein, Joely Fisher, and Cameron Diaz in her film debut. It revolves around Stanley Ipkiss (Carrey), an unfortunate bank clerk who finds a magical mask that transforms him into a mischievous zoot-suited gangster.

The film was released on July 29, 1994, by New Line Cinema, becoming a critical and commercial success, grossing over $351 million over a $23 million budget. It cemented Carrey's reputation as a dominant actor of the 1990s, and established Diaz long-term as a leading lady. Carrey was nominated for a Golden Globe for his role, and the film was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Visual Effects but lost to Forrest Gump. A stand-alone sequel, Son of the Mask, was released in 2005.

Vacation (2015 film)

Vacation is a 2015 American comedy film written and directed by Jonathan Goldstein and John Francis Daley (in their directorial debuts). It stars Ed Helms, Christina Applegate, Skyler Gisondo, Steele Stebbins, Leslie Mann, Chris Hemsworth, Beverly D'Angelo, and Chevy Chase. It is the fifth installment of the Vacation film series, serving as a soft reboot. It is also the second not to carry the National Lampoon name after Vegas Vacation, and was released by New Line Cinema and Warner Bros. on July 29, 2015. It has an approval rating of 26% on Rotten Tomatoes and grossed $104 million on a $31 million budget.

We're the Millers

We're the Millers is a 2013 American comedy film directed by Rawson M. Thurber and starring Jennifer Aniston, Jason Sudeikis, Emma Roberts, Will Poulter, Nick Offerman, Kathryn Hahn, Molly Quinn, and Ed Helms. The film's screenplay was written by Bob Fisher, Steve Faber, Sean Anders, and John Morris, based on a story by Fisher and Faber. The plot follows a small-time pot dealer (Sudeikis) who convinces his neighbors to help him by pretending to be his family, in order to smuggle drugs from Mexico into the United States.

The film was released on August 7, 2013 by New Line Cinema through Warner Bros. Pictures. It grossed $270,000,000 worldwide during its theatrical run, against a $37,000,000 budget. The film was nominated for four People's Choice Awards, and six MTV Movie Awards, winning two. In 2014 New Line Cinema said a sequel was in development.

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