New Castle, New York

New Castle is a town in Westchester County, New York, United States. The population was 17,569 at the 2010 census.[3] It includes the hamlets of Chappaqua and Millwood.

New Castle, New York
New Castle, New York 2016 334
Location of New Castle, New York
Location of New Castle, New York
Coordinates: 41°11′7″N 73°46′7″W / 41.18528°N 73.76861°WCoordinates: 41°11′7″N 73°46′7″W / 41.18528°N 73.76861°W
CountryUnited States
StateNew York
CountyWestchester
Founded1791
Government
 • TypeTown
Area
 • Total23.53 sq mi (60.93 km2)
 • Land23.16 sq mi (59.99 km2)
 • Water0.36 sq mi (0.94 km2)
Elevation
561 ft (171 m)
Population
 (2010)
 • Total17,569
 • Estimate 
(2016)[2]
18,100
 • Density781.42/sq mi (301.70/km2)
Time zoneUTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP
10510,10514, 10546, 10549, 10562
FIPS code36-50078
GNIS feature ID0979260
Websitehttp://www.mynewcastle.org

History

New Castle was originally inhabited by several Native American tribes, including the Siwanoy and the Wappinger. Portions of New Castle were initially purchased in 1640 by Nathaniel Turner from Ponas Sagamore, chief of the Siwanoy. In 1661, John Richbell purchased land, including all of present-day New Castle, from the Siwanoy. In 1696, Caleb Heathcote purchased that tract of land from Richbell's widow. What is present-day New Castle was originally incorporated as part of the town of North Castle, which was jokingly referred to as "the two saddlebags," in 1736. The first European settlers in the area were Quakers, who settled in present-day Chappaqua in 1753 and constructed a meeting house, which still stands today on Quaker Street. The town of New Castle broke away from North Castle in 1791.

New Castle has several locations on the National Register of Historic Places, including The Williams-DuBois House, Old Chappaqua Historic District, and Isaac Young House.[4] Two buildings from Horace Greeley's former farm are also on the National Historic Register, including the Greeley House, which houses the headquarters for the New Castle Historical Society, and Rehoboth, the first concrete barn in the country.

Education

The majority of the town is served by the Chappaqua Central School District, which consists of three elementary schools, two middle schools, and one high school. The elementary schools are Grafflin Elementary School, Roaring Brook Elementary School, and Westorchard Elementary School. The middle schools are Seven Bridges Middle School and Robert E. Bell Middle School, and the high school is Horace Greeley High School, named for newspaper editor, presidential candidate and New Castle resident Horace Greeley. Other parts of New Castle fall within the Byram Hills Central School District, Bedford Central School District, Yorktown Central School District, and the Ossining Union Free School District.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 23.5 square miles (61 km2), of which 23.2 square miles (60 km2) is land and 0.3 square miles (0.78 km2), or 1.15%, is water. New Castle is bordered by the towns of Mount Pleasant and Ossining to the southwest and North Castle to the southeast. It is bordered by the towns of Bedford, Mount Kisco, and Somers to the northeast and Yorktown and Cortlandt to the northwest.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
18201,368
18301,336−2.3%
18401,52914.4%
18501,80017.7%
18601,8170.9%
18702,15218.4%
18802,2976.7%
18902,110−8.1%
19002,40113.8%
19103,57348.8%
19203,6391.8%
19306,79286.6%
19407,90316.4%
19508,80211.4%
196014,38863.5%
197019,83737.9%
198015,425−22.2%
199016,6487.9%
200017,4915.1%
201017,5690.4%
Est. 201618,100[2]3.0%
U.S. Decennial Census[5]

As of the census[6] of 2000, there were 17,491 people, 5,732 households, and 4,929 families residing in the town. The population density was 754.8 people per square mile (291.5/km²). There were 5,843 housing units at an average density of 252.2 per square mile (97.4/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 91.50% White, 1.37% African American, 0.05% Native American, 5.55% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.51% from other races, and 1.00% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.78% of the population.

There were 5,732 households out of which 49.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 79.0% were married couples living together, 5.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 14.0% were non-families. 11.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 4.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.04 and the average family size was 3.28.

In the town, the population was spread out with 31.9% under the age of 18, 3.6% from 18 to 24, 25.4% from 25 to 44, 29.9% from 45 to 64, and 9.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 97.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.2 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $159,691, and the median income for a family was $174,579. Males had a median income of $100,000 versus $67,275 for females. The per capita income for the town was $73,888. About 2.0% of families and 3.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.6% of those under age 18 and 3.6% of those age 65 or over.

Communities and locations in New Castle

  • Chappaqua is the largest hamlet of New Castle. Its center is located in the southeastern part of the town, but most of the town falls under Chappaqua's ZIP code.
  • Millwood is a hamlet located in the northwest part of the town.
  • Portions of the Town of New Castle fall within the ZIP codes and school districts of Armonk, Briarcliff Manor, Mount Kisco, Ossining, and Pleasantville, and are commonly associated with those places. Additionally, there is no one specific location within the town that is known as New Castle.

Notable residents

Notable people who live and have previously lived in New Castle include:

References

  1. ^ "2016 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved Jul 5, 2017.
  2. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  3. ^ "Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (DP-1): New Castle town, Westchester County, New York". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved November 15, 2011.
  4. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. March 13, 2009.
  5. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  6. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.

External links

1904 Chappaqua tornado

The 1904 Chappaqua tornado was an intense tornado that struck northern Westchester County, New York during the afternoon of Saturday, July 16, 1904. As of 2019, this tornado ranks as the strongest tornado to touch down in the county, ranking as F3 on the modern-day Fujita Scale. The tornado formed around 3:30 pm EST within a severe thunderstorm near Chappaqua, New York. The tornado quickly began to produce damage in the hamlet, destroying several structures and killing two people. Homes were knocked off their foundations and rolled over along the tornado's path. By 4:00 pm EST, the tornado dissipated and left $100,000 (1904 USD; $2.4 million 2009 USD) worth of damage in its wake. Hail associated with the same storm cell also inflicted damage upon a few structures. The tornado is known as the worst disaster in the history of Chappaqua.

Bruce Gilchrist

Bruce Gilchrist (4 August 1930 – 23 May 2015) is considered one of the notable figures in modern computing history.

Carrie Chapman Catt House

The Carrie Chapman Catt House, also known as Juniper Ledge, is located on Ryder Road in the town of New Castle, New York, United States. It is an Arts and Crafts-style building from the early 20th century. In 2006 it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places; five years later it was designated a town landmark as well.While it is a fine example of its school of architecture, the house's primary historical value is that it was the home of suffragist Carrie Chapman Catt and her partner Mary Hay from 1919 to 1928. That period was the height of her activism; it began with the passage and ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment, which granted women the right to vote, and continued with her founding of the League of Women Voters and advocacy of women's suffrage in other countries.

She found the house an ideal place to rest her "tired nerves" since the land was too steep to farm productively. However, later on she did start limited farming, including raising cattle and chickens, on the land, and made some significant modifications to the property. She also claimed to a group of guests during the early years of Prohibition that she had bought the land to prevent anyone from using its juniper berries to make gin.After nine years, she and Hay, who had never embraced the rural lifestyle, moved out. The land has been further subdivided but the house remains largely intact. It is still a private residence. Composer Carmino Ravosa, who learned of Catt's residence there while researching a musical, has worked to preserve it.

Chappaqua, New York

Chappaqua ( CHAP-ə-kwah) is a hamlet and census-designated place in the town of New Castle, in northern Westchester County, New York. It is on 0.45 square miles (1.2 km2) of land on the east bank of the Hudson River, about 30 miles (50 km) north of New York City. The hamlet is served by the Chappaqua station of the Metro-North Railroad's Harlem Line. In the New York State Legislature it is within the New York State Assembly's 93rd district and the New York Senate's 40th district. In Congress the village is in New York's 17th District.

Chappaqua was founded by a group of Quakers in the 1730s and was the home of Horace Greeley, New-York Tribune editor and U.S. congressman. Since the late 1990s, former President Bill Clinton and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton have lived there.

Chappaqua Central School District

The Chappaqua Central School District is a K-12 public school district serving students in Chappaqua, New York, and Millwood, New York, as well as parts of Pleasantville, New York, and Mount Kisco, New York. The current superintendent of schools is Dr. Christine Ackerman. Chappaqua Central School District is ranked 40th Best School District in the United States by Niche.

Gideon Louis Boissevain

Gideon Louis Boissevain (October 4, 1870 - April 25, 1924) was president of the Hilliard Hotel Company and on the board of directors for the Knickerbocker Trust Company.

Greeley House (Chappaqua, New York)

The Greeley House is located at King (New York State Route 120) and Senter streets in downtown Chappaqua, New York, United States. It was built about 1820 and served as the home of newspaper editor and later presidential candidate Horace Greeley from 1864 to his death in 1872. In 1979 it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places along with several other properties nearby related to Greeley and his family.Built in the 1820s as a typical small farmhouse, it was expanded in the mid-19th century. Greeley, editor of the New-York Tribune, settled in Chappaqua shortly before the Civil War in the mid-19th century, living there with his family primarily during the summer. After a mob of citizens opposed to Greeley's abolitionist editorial stance threatened his wife at their earlier "House in the Woods," Greeley bought the farmhouse and moved his family there, near the hundred acres (40 ha) where he ran a small farm and practiced experimental agricultural techniques.

After the war, Greeley built a mansion called "Hillside House" to live in, but died along with his wife shortly after the 1872 presidential election, where he ran on the Liberal Republican line against incumbent Ulysses S. Grant, so his children lived there instead, pioneering the suburban lifestyle that was later to define Chappaqua and its neighboring communities. Both of Greeley's other houses burned down later in the 19th century, leaving the Greeley House the only one extant.It, too, was almost demolished after falling into serious neglect in the early 20th century. After its restoration in 1940, it was used as a restaurant and gift shop. Following another restoration effort in the early 21st century, it is now the offices of the New Castle Historical Society.

Horace Greeley High School

Horace Greeley High School is a public, four-year secondary school serving students in grades 9–12 in Chappaqua, New York, United States. It is part of the Chappaqua Central School District.

It is consistently ranked among the top high schools in America. In 2015 it was listed as the #1 best public high school in the US by Best Colleges, and the #17 Smartest Public High School in the US by Business Insider.

Isaac Young

Isaac Young may refer to:

Isaac D. Young (1849–1927), U.S. Congressman

Isaac Young House, a wood frame house in New Castle, New York, listed on the National Register of Historic Places

Isaac Young House

The Isaac Young House is an historic wood frame house on Pinesbridge Road in New Castle, New York, United States. It was built about 1872 in the Second Empire style. Its owner, Isaac Young, was a descendant of early settlers in the area. He chose the Second Empire style, more commonly found in cities and villages than on farms, possibly as a way of demonstrating his affluence. The present structure appears to incorporate parts of a vernacular late 18th-century farmhouse, leaving several anomalies in the current house as a result. The house's position atop a low hill would have, in its time, given it a commanding view of the region, including the Hudson River and New York City's skyline.

The Isaac Young House is the only Second Empire house from that era in New Castle. There have been several renovations and alterations, including the removal of its original Italianate central tower. The current owners restored it extensively after purchasing it from the Youngs. In 2004 the house and its barn were listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Millwood, New York

Millwood is a hamlet located in the town of New Castle, New York in Westchester County. It was originally settled as Sarlesville. The area now known as Millwood appears on 19th century maps as Merritt's Corners (now the intersection of NY 100 and NY 120) and Rockdale Mills (close to what is now the Briarcliff Manor border). As of the 2000 census, the community had a population of 1,210.

Miss America 1984 beauty pageant, model, actress and singer Vanessa Williams grew up in Millwood, but lives in New Castle's other hamlet of Chappaqua.Sarles' Tavern, also known as Granite House, was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1979.

Millwood station (New York Central Railroad)

The Millwood station was a railroad station on the New York and Putnam Railroad in the hamlet of Millwood in New Castle, New York. It was located on Station Road just south of the southeast corner of the west end of the NY 120/133 overlap. Originally built by the New York and Putnam Railroad in 1881, this later became the Putnam Division of the New York Central Railroad. The original station house was built in 1888 but burnt to the ground soon after. The station was replaced in 1910 when the old Briarcliff Manor station was moved by flat car to the current location. The Putnam Line ended passenger service in 1962; the line was abandoned and now serves as the North County Trailway rail trail.

After the line's passenger use ended, the station variously served as a real estate office and fruit and vegetable market.The station, which had fallen into a state of disrepair, was demolished on May 9, 2012 after it was determined that it would be too costly to repair. According to demolition workers, several support beams on the inside of the building had fallen down, and several others had nearly been eaten through by insects. The station was identical to the Ardsley, Yorktown Heights, Baldwin Place, and two other stations on the line.

Old Chappaqua Historic District

The Old Chappaqua Historic District is located along Quaker Road (New York State Route 120) in the town of New Castle, New York, United States, between the hamlets of Chappaqua and Millwood. It was the original center of Chappaqua, prior to the construction of the Harlem Valley Railroad and the erection of its station to the south in the mid-19th century. In 1974 it was recognized as a historic district and listed on the National Register of Historic Places.What is today Chappaqua was first settled around 1740 by a group of Quakers from Long Island. They built the still-used meeting house, the oldest known building in the town, around which the district centered a decade later. The other contributing properties, all timber frame buildings up and down the road on either side near the meeting house, are the surviving buildings from some of the farms established then and later. They have been preserved intact from that time.

Ralph Thomas Walker

Ralph Thomas Walker, FAIA, (1889–1973) was an American architect, president of the American Institute of Architects and partner of the firm McKenzie, Voorhees, Gmelin; and its successor firms Voorhees, Gmelin & Walker, Voorhees, Walker, Foley & Smith; Voorhees, Walker, Smith & Smith; and Voorhees, Walker, Smith, Smith & Haines. Walker is best known for his designs for the Barclay-Vesey Telephone Building (1922–26) and the Irving Trust Building (1928–31).

Walker was called "The only other honest architect in America" by Frank Lloyd Wright, and "Architect of the Century" by The New York Times when he received the Centennial Medal of Honor from the American Institute of Architects. His Art Deco designs have been called "bold, spectacularly dynamic", "radical", "distinctive", "theatrical ... very dramatic", "syncopated and jazzy".

Rehoboth (Chappaqua, New York)

Rehoboth is a historic former barn located on Aldridge Road in Chappaqua, New York, United States. It is a concrete structure that has been renovated into a house with some Gothic Revival decorative elements. In 1979 it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.It was designed and built in the mid-19th century by newspaper editor and activist Horace Greeley as one of the agricultural experiments he dabbled in, testing whether concrete would make a good building material for farms. It was one of the first concrete structures in the country, and the first concrete barn. Greeley was so satisfied with the result he predicted that he would be remembered for it if nothing else.Two decades after Greeley's death, his daughter Gabrielle and her husband, The Rev. Frank Clendenin, pastor of a New York City Episcopal church, commissioned architect Ralph Adams Cram to remodel it into their house, which he named Rehoboth. They lived there for the rest of their lives, the remodeled house becoming one of the centers of Chappaqua's social life as it completed its metamorphosis from country town to suburb. It has remained a private home since then.

Residences of Donald Trump

U.S. president Donald Trump currently has seven residences.

During his time at the New York Military Academy, he lived on campus; he later rented row houses in college. In 1971, Trump moved to a studio on 75th Street in Manhattan. Since the completion of Trump Tower in 1983, Trump has lived in a three-level penthouse on the top floors. He purchased the Seven Springs mansion in Bedford, New York, in 1995. Upon Trump's election to the US presidency, he moved into the White House in Washington, D.C., while First Lady Melania and their son initially stayed at Trump Tower in Manhattan until the end of the school year before moving to the White House as well.

Williams House

Williams House or Williams Farm may refer to:

in the United States(by state, then city/town)

Arthur Williams Homestead, Feed Storage Shed, Bradford, Arkansas, listed on the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) in White County

Maguire-Williams House, Elkins, Arkansas, listed on the NRHP in Arkansas

Williams-Wootton House, Hot Springs, Arkansas, listed on the NRHP in Arkansas

Dr. Robert George Williams House, Parkdale, Arkansas, NRHP-listed

Williams House and Associated Farmstead, St. Paul, Arkansas, listed on the NRHP in Arkansas

Williams House (Searcy, Arkansas), listed on the NRHP in Arkansas

Duckworth-Williams House, Siloam Springs, Arkansas, listed on the NRHP in Arkansas

E. B. Williams House, Kingman, Arizona, NRHP-listed

Dan Williams House, Safford, Arizona, listed on the NRHP in Arizona

Roger Y. Williams House, San Juan Capistrano, California, listed on the NRHP in California

Austin F. Williams Carriagehouse and House, Farmington, Connecticut, NRHP-listed

William Williams House (Lebanon, Connecticut), Lebanon, Connecticut, a National Historic Landmark and NRHP-listed

Eleazer Williams House, Mansfield Center, Connecticut, NRHP-listed

Warham Williams House, Northford, Connecticut, listed on the NRHP in Connecticut

Williams and Stancliff Octagon Houses, Portland, Connecticut, NRHP-listed

Buttolph-Williams House, Wethersfield, Connecticut, NRHP-listed

James Williams House, Kenton, Delaware, NRHP-listed

J. K. Williams House, Odessa, Delaware, NRHP-listed

Williams House (Odessa, Delaware), NRHP-listed

Williams House (Fort Lauderdale, Florida), NRHP-listed

John C. Williams House, St. Petersburg, Florida, NRHP-listed

Williams House (Tallahassee, Florida), NRHP-listed

Williams-Moore-Hillsman House, Roberta, Georgia, listed on the NRHP in Georgia

Williams Family Farm, Villa Rica, Georgia, listed on the NRHP in Georgia

James Robert Williams House, Carmi, Illinois, NRHP-listed

Dr. Daniel Hale Williams House, Chicago, Illinois, NRHP-listed

Daniel Hale Williams House, Chicago, Illinois, NRHP-listed

Silas Williams House, Streator, Illinois, NRHP-listed

Samuel P. Williams House, Howe, Indiana, listed on the NRHP in Indiana

Williams-Warren-Zimmerman House, Terre Haute, Indiana, listed on the NRHP in Indiana

Potter-Williams House (Davenport, Iowa), Davenport, Iowa, NRHP-listed

M. D. L. Williams Barn, Bendena, Kansas, listed on the NRHP in Kansas

Eustace Williams House, Anchorage, Kentucky, listed on the NRHP in Kentucky

Smith-Williams House, Burgin, Kentucky, listed on the NRHP in Kentucky

Williams House (Harrodsburg, Kentucky), listed on the NRHP in Kentucky

Abraham L. Williams L & N Guest House, Lyndon, Kentucky, listed on the NRHP in Kentucky

Merritt Williams House, Midway, Kentucky, listed on the NRHP in Kentucky

Hubbard Williams House, Millersburg, Kentucky, listed on the NRHP in Kentucky

Williams House (Red Bush, Kentucky), listed on the NRHP in Kentucky

John Williams House (Shawhan, Kentucky), listed on the NRHP in Kentucky

Thomas H. Williams House, Springfield, Kentucky, listed on the NRHP in Kentucky

Daniel Motley Williams House, Summersville, Kentucky, listed on the NRHP in Kentucky

Williams House (Mansfield, Louisiana), listed on the NRHP in Louisiana

Isaacs-Williams Mansion, New Orleans, Louisiana, listed on the NRHP in Louisiana

Gen. John Williams House, Bangor, Maine, listed on the NRHP in Maine

John Williams House (Mount Vernon, Maine), listed on the NRHP in Maine

Timothy and Jane Williams House, Rockland, Maine, listed on the NRHP in Maine

Deane-Williams House, Cambridge, Massachusetts, NRHP-listed

Peabody-Williams House, Newton, Massachusetts, NRHP-listed

Charles Williams House, Somerville, Massachusetts, NRHP-listed

Charles Williams, Jr., House, Somerville, Massachusetts, NRHP-listed

F. G. Williams House, Somerville, Massachusetts, NRHP-listed

Micah Williams House, Stoneham, Massachusetts, NRHP-listed

Williams-Linscott House, Stoneham, Massachusetts, NRHP-listed

Fairbanks-Williams House, Taunton, Massachusetts, NRHP-listed

Abiathar King Williams House, Taunton, Massachusetts, NRHP-listed

Enoch Williams House, Taunton, Massachusetts, NRHP-listed

Francis D. Williams House, Taunton, Massachusetts, NRHP-listed

N. S. Williams House, Taunton, Massachusetts, NRHP-listed

N. Williams House, Uxbridge, Massachusetts, NRHP-listed

Williams-Cole House, Durand, Michigan, listed on the NRHP in Michigan

Alfred Williams House, Owosso, Michigan, listed on the NRHP in Michigan

Benjamin Williams House, Owosso, Michigan, listed on the NRHP in Michigan

C. E. Williams House, Mora, Minnesota, listed on the NRHP in Minnesota

Ford-Williams House, Energy, Mississippi, listed on the NRHP in Mississippi

Jim Williams House, Enterprise, Mississippi, listed on the NRHP in Mississippi

Galloway-Williams House, Jackson, Mississippi, listed on the NRHP in Mississippi

Alex Williams House, Jackson, Mississippi, listed on the NRHP in Mississippi

C. C. Williams House, Clinton, Missouri, listed on the NRHP in Henry County

John Siddle Williams House, Hermitage, Missouri, listed on the NRHP in Hickory County

Williams-Gierth House, Poplar Bluff, Missouri, listed on the NRHP in Butler County

Williams House (Stevensville, Montana), listed on the NRHP in Montana

John and Ann Williams House, Stevensville, Montana, listed on the NRHP in Montana

Royer-Williams House, Lincoln, Nebraska, listed on the NRHP in Nebraska

Thomas and Mary Williams Homestead, Taylor, Nebraska, NRHP-listed

Dr. Edward H. Williams House, Beach Haven, New Jersey, listed on the NRHP in New Jersey

Williams-Harrison House, Roseland, New Jersey, NRHP-listed

William Carlos Williams House, Rutherford, New Jersey, NRHP-listed

John S. Williams House and Farm, Chatham, New York, NRHP-listed

Elisha Williams House, Hudson, New York, NRHP-listed

Henry Williams House (Huntington, New York), NRHP-listed

Potter-Williams House (Huntington, New York), NRHP-listed

Sherman Williams House and Fruit Barn, Jerusalem, New York, NRHP-listed

Dayton-Williams House, Middle Granville, New York, NRHP-listed

Williams-DuBois House, New Castle, New York, NRHP-listed

R. C. Williams Warehouse, New York, New York, NRHP-listed

Johann Williams Farm, Niagara Falls, New York, NRHP-listed

Post-Williams House, Poughkeepsie, New York, NRHP-listed

Williams Farm (Rhinebeck, New York), NRHP-listed

Greenridge-Arthur Williams House, Roslyn Harbor, New York, NRHP-listed

Robert Williams House, Eastover, North Carolina, listed on the NRHP in North Carolina

Smith-Williams-Durham Boarding House, Hendersonville, North Carolina, listed on the NRHP in North Carolina

Williams, Jr., Solomon and Kate, House, Inez, North Carolina, listed on the NRHP in North Carolina

Humphrey-Williams House, Lumberton, North Carolina, NRHP-listed

Isaac Williams House, Newton Grove, North Carolina, listed on the NRHP in North Carolina

Williams-Powell House, Orrum, North Carolina, listed on the NRHP in North Carolina

Olzie Whitehead Williams House, Wilson, North Carolina, listed on the NRHP in North Carolina

Towne-Williams House, Bismarck, North Dakota, NRHP-listed

Henry Harrison Williams House, Avon, Ohio, listed on the NRHP in Ohio

W. L. Williams House, Cincinnati, Ohio, NRHP-listed

Abner Williams Log House, Lashley, Ohio, NRHP-listed

Elias Williams House, Newark, Ohio, listed on the NRHP in Ohio

Dr. Issac Elmer Williams House and Office, St. Marys, Ohio, NRHP-listed

Judge Henry Williams House, Troy, Ohio, listed on the NRHP in Ohio

Williams House (Williamsburg, Ohio), listed on the NRHP in Ohio

C. S. Williams House, Eugene, Oregon, listed on the NRHP in Oregon

George H. Williams Townhouses, Portland, Oregon, NRHP-listed

Cox–Williams House, St. Helens, Oregon

Bennett–Williams House, The Dalles, Oregon

Ellis Williams House, East Goshen, Pennsylvania, NRHP-listed

John Williams Farm, Phoenixville, Pennsylvania, NRHP-listed

John Williams House (Williams Grove, Pennsylvania), NRHP-listed

Williams-Ligon House, Easley, South Carolina, NRHP-listed

Williams-Earle House, Greenville, South Carolina, listed on the NRHP in South Carolina

Williams Place, Glenn Springs, South Carolina, listed on the NRHP in South Carolina

Williams-Ball-Copeland House, Laurens, South Carolina, NRHP-listed

Tom Williams House, Williams, South Carolina, NRHP-listed

Williams House (Ulmer, South Carolina), NRHP-listed

John and Kittie Williams House, Webster, South Dakota, listed on the NRHP in South Dakota

Colonel John Williams House, Knoxville, Tennessee, listed on the NRHP in Tennessee

Fite-Williams-Ligon House, Carthage, Tennessee, listed on the NRHP in Tennessee

Jordan-Williams House, Nolensville, Tennessee, NRHP-listed

W. T. and Clotilde V. Williams House, Austin, Texas, listed on the NRHP in Texas

McCanless-Williams House, Ennis, Texas, listed on the NRHP in Texas

Samuel May Williams House, Galveston, Texas, NRHP-listed

Williams-Brueder House, Houston, Texas, listed on the NRHP in Texas

Dial-Williamson House, Marshall, Texas, listed on the NRHP in Texas

Williams-Tarbutton House, San Marcos, Texas, listed on the NRHP in Texas

Williams-Anderson House, Tyler, Texas, listed on the NRHP in Texas

B. F. Williams House, Victoria, Texas, listed on the NRHP in Texas

Porter L. Williams House, Waxahachie, Texas, listed on the NRHP in Texas

Williams-Erwin House, Waxahachie, Texas, listed on the NRHP in Texas

Nathaniel J. Williams House, Park City, Utah, listed on the NRHP in Utah

Reese Williams House, Park City, Utah, listed on the NRHP in Utah

Williams House (Richlands, Virginia), NRHP-listed

Williams-Brown House and Store, Salem, Virginia, NRHP-listed

Hattie Williams House, Irondale, Washington, listed on the NRHP in Washington

James and Corinne Williams House, Spokane, Washington, listed on the NRHP in Washington

Sidney Williams House, Sumner, Washington, listed on the NRHP in Washington

Herbert Williams House, Sumner, Washington, listed on the NRHP in Washington

Lewis-Williams House, Hudson, Wisconsin, NRHP-listed

William G. and Anne Williams House, Sparta, Wisconsin, NRHP-listed

Frank J. Williams House, Whitefish Bay, Wisconsin, listed on the NRHP in Wisconsin

Williams–DuBois House

The Williams–DuBois House is located at Grace Lane and Pinesbridge Road in New Castle, New York, United States. It was built by an early settler of the area during the Revolutionary War. In 1989 it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.Originally built in the Georgian-influenced American Colonial style, it later acquired some Federal style decoration, particularly on the interior. The lunette windows on the second story may have been added later, after their use on a now-demolished local hotel. Despite later modifications, it is the only house from that era remaining in the town that has a gambrel roof. It remains a private residence.

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