Netherlands women's national football team

The Netherlands women's national football team (Dutch: Nederlands vrouwenvoetbalelftal) is directed by the Royal Dutch Football Association (KNVB), which is a member of UEFA and FIFA.

In 1971, the team played the first women's international football match recognized by FIFA against France.[3] They have played at the final tournament of the 2009, 2013, and 2017 UEFA Women's Championship and were champions in 2017. They have played at the final tournament of the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup for the first time, and reached thirteenth place. They have also played at the final tournament in the 2019 edition, losing 2-0 the final against the United States.

The nicknames for the team are Oranje (Orange) and Leeuwinnen (Lionesses).[1] Sarina Wiegman has been head coach since January 2017.[4] As of July 2019, the team is ranked number 3 in the FIFA Women's World Rankings.

Netherlands
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)Oranje (Orange)
Leeuwinnen (Lionesses)[1]
AssociationRoyal Dutch Football Association
(Koninklijke Nederlandse Voetbalbond)
ConfederationUEFA (Europe)
Head coachSarina Wiegman
CaptainSari van Veenendaal
Most capsSherida Spitse (169)
Top scorerVivianne Miedema (61)
FIFA codeNED
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 3 Increase 5 (12 July 2019)[2]
Highest3[2] (July 2019)
Lowest20[2] (June 2008)
First international
 France 4–0 Netherlands 
(Hazebrouck, France; 17 April 1971)
Biggest win
 Netherlands 12–0 Israel 
(Zaandam, Netherlands; 22 August 1977)
 Netherlands 13–1 Macedonia 
(Zwolle, Netherlands; 29 October 2009)
Biggest defeat
 Sweden 7–0 Netherlands 
(Borås, Sweden; 26 September 1981)
World Cup
Appearances2 (first in 2015)
Best resultRunners-up (2019)
European Championship
Appearances3 (first in 2009)
Best resultWinners (2017)
Netherlands womens national football team May 2014
Netherlands women's national football team in May 2014

History

On 17 April 1971, the Dutch team played the first women's international football match recognized by FIFA against France.[3] The match took place in Hazebrouck, France and resulted in a 4–0 defeat for the Netherlands.[5]

In 1980s and 1990s, the team failed to qualify for the final tournaments of UEFA's European Championship and later also for the FIFA's World Championship.[5] The Royal Dutch Football Association began major investments into women's football in the 2000s, culminating in the establishment of the Women's Eredivisie in 2007 (which was merged with the Belgian league in 2012).[6][7] The team qualified for the UEFA Women's Euro 2009 and reached third place together with Norway, after England (second place) and Germany (first place).[8] The team again qualified for the UEFA Women's Euro 2013, but did not advance after the group stage.[9]

The team qualified for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup and reached thirteenth place, after having lost their first match in the knockout stage to Japan.[10]

In 2017, the Netherlands won their first major women's trophy, ending Germany's seemingly unbeatable reign over the UEFA Women's Championship and surprising friend and foe alike by winning the tournament on home soil, beating Denmark 4–2 in the final.[11] The successful campaign in which Oranje managed to win all of their matches highly contributed to the popularity of women's football in the Netherlands.[12]

In 2018, the Netherlands finished second in their UEFA Qualifying Group behind Norway. Therefore, they had to go through the UEFA play-off in order to qualify for the 2019 World Cup featuring the Switzerland, Belgium and Denmark are the other teams in the play-off.[13]. The Netherlands beat Denmark 4-1 on aggregate in the play-off semi-finals before beating Switzerland 4-1 on aggregate in the play-off final to qualify.[14]

Honours

Tournament record

FIFA World Cup


On 27 November 2014, the Netherlands national football team qualified to the final tournament of the FIFA Women's World Cup for the first time.[16] In 2019, they reached the Final and lost to the United States team.[17]

Netherlands's FIFA World Cup record
Host nation
and year
Result Pos Pld W D* L GF GA
China 1991 Did not qualify
Sweden 1995
United States 1999
United States 2003
China 2007
Germany 2011
Canada 2015 Round of 16 13th 4 1 1 2 3 4
France 2019 Runners-up 2nd 7 6 0 1 11 5
Total 2/8 2nd 11 7 1 3 14 9
* Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

Olympic Games

Netherlands's Olympic Games record
Host nation
and year
Round Pos Pld W D* L GF GA
United States 1996 Did not qualify
Australia 2000
Greece 2004
China 2008
United Kingdom 2012
Brazil 2016
Japan 2020 Qualified
Total 1/7

UEFA European Championship

The Netherlands failed to qualify for the final tournament of the UEFA Women's Championship from 1984 to 2005. In 2009, the Dutch women's team qualified and reached third place.[18] In 2013, they qualified again, but did not advance after the group stage.[19] The Dutch women booked a major victory on the 2017 tournament: following a 4–2 victory over Denmark they became the new European champion. Furthermore, Lieke Martens was heralded as the best player of the tournament.[20]

Netherlands's UEFA European Championship record
Host nation(s)
and year
Result Pos Pld W D* L GF GA
1984** Did not qualify
Norway 1987
West Germany 1989
Denmark 1991
Italy 1993
England Germany Norway Sweden 1995
Norway 1997
Germany 2001
England 2005
Finland 2009 Semi-finals 3rd 5 2 1 2 6 5
Sweden 2013 Group stage 12th 3 0 1 2 0 2
Netherlands 2017 Champions 1st 6 6 0 0 13 3
Total 3/12 14 8 2 4 19 10
* Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.
** Missing flag indicates no host country.

Algarve Cup

The Algarve Cup is a global invitational tournament for national teams in women's soccer hosted by the Portuguese Football Federation (FPF). Held annually in the Algarve region of Portugal since 1994, it is one of the most prestigious women's football events, alongside the Women's World Cup and Women's Olympic Football.

Year Result Pld W D* L GF GA
1994 Did not enter
1995 5th place 4 1 1 2 3 5
1996 Did not enter
1997 5th place 4 2 0 2 2 5
1998 6th place 4 1 0 3 4 11
1999 Did not enter
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017 5th place 4 3 0 1 7 5
2018 Champions[15][21] 3 3 0 0 9 4
2019 11th place 3 0 1 2 1 4
Total 6/26 22 10 2 10 26 34
* Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Norway 8 7 0 1 22 4 +18 21 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup 2–1 1–0 4–1 6–1
2  Netherlands 8 6 1 1 22 2 +20 19 Play-offs 1–0 0–0 7–0 1–0
3  Republic of Ireland 8 4 1 3 10 6 +4 13 0–2 0–2 4–0 2–1
4  Northern Ireland 8 1 0 7 4 27 −23 3[a] 0–3 0–5 0–2 0–1
5  Slovakia 8 1 0 7 4 23 −19 3[a] 0–4 0–5 0–2 1–3
  1. ^ a b Head-to-head results: Slovakia 1–3 Northern Ireland, Northern Ireland 0–1 Slovakia.

Play-off semi-finals

All times are CEST (UTC+2), as listed by UEFA.

Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Netherlands  4–1  Denmark 2–0 2–1
Belgium  3–3 (a)   Switzerland 2–2 1–1
Netherlands 2–0 Denmark
Report
Denmark 1–2 Netherlands
Report

Play-off final

Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Netherlands  4–1   Switzerland 3–0 1–1
Netherlands 3–0  Switzerland
Report
Switzerland  1-1 Netherlands
  • Sow Goal 71'
Report

Results and fixtures

The following is a list of matches in 2018 and 2019[22]

2019

Players

Current squad

The following 23 players were named to the squad for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup.[23][24]

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1 GK Sari van Veenendaal (captain) 3 April 1990 (age 29) 59 0 England Arsenal
16 GK Loes Geurts 12 January 1986 (age 33) 123 0 Sweden Göteborg
23 GK Lize Kop 17 March 1998 (age 21) 1 0 Netherlands Ajax

2 DF Desiree van Lunteren 30 December 1992 (age 26) 77 0 Germany Freiburg
3 DF Stefanie van der Gragt 16 August 1992 (age 26) 60 8 Spain Barcelona
5 DF Kika van Es 11 October 1991 (age 27) 61 0 Netherlands Ajax
6 DF Anouk Dekker 15 November 1986 (age 32) 80 7 France Montpellier
17 DF Merel van Dongen 11 February 1993 (age 26) 33 1 Spain Real Betis
18 DF Danique Kerkdijk 1 May 1996 (age 23) 14 0 England Brighton & Hove Albion
20 DF Dominique Bloodworth 17 January 1995 (age 24) 53 1 Germany VfL Wolfsburg
22 DF Liza van der Most 8 October 1993 (age 25) 13 0 Netherlands Ajax

4 MF Victoria Pelova 3 June 1999 (age 20) 3 0 Netherlands Ajax
8 MF Sherida Spitse 29 May 1990 (age 29) 168 30 Norway Vålerenga
10 MF Daniëlle van de Donk 5 August 1991 (age 27) 95 16 England Arsenal
12 MF Jill Roord 22 April 1997 (age 22) 47 4 England Arsenal
14 MF Jackie Groenen 17 December 1994 (age 24) 53 3 England Manchester United
15 MF Inessa Kaagman 17 April 1996 (age 23) 2 0 England Everton

7 FW Shanice van de Sanden 2 October 1992 (age 26) 70 17 France Lyon
9 FW Vivianne Miedema 15 July 1996 (age 23) 81 61 England Arsenal
11 FW Lieke Martens 16 December 1992 (age 26) 109 44 Spain Barcelona
13 FW Renate Jansen 7 December 1990 (age 28) 37 3 Netherlands Twente
19 FW Ellen Jansen 6 October 1992 (age 26) 14 1 Netherlands Ajax
21 FW Lineth Beerensteyn 11 October 1996 (age 22) 46 10 Germany Bayern Munich

Recent call-ups

The following players were named to a squad in the last 12 months.

This list may be incomplete.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Barbara Lorsheyd 26 March 1991 (age 28) 0 0 Netherlands Den Haag 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup SBY
GK Jennifer Vreugdenhil 12 January 1995 (age 24) 1 0 Spain Valencia 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup SBY

DF Aniek Nouwen 9 March 1999 (age 20) 2 0 Netherlands PSV 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup PRE
DF Siri Worm 20 April 1992 (age 27) 39 1 England Tottenham Hotspur 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup SBY

MF Cheyenne van den Goorbergh 6 September 1997 (age 21) 1 1 Netherlands Twente 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup SBY
MF Kelly Zeeman 19 November 1993 (age 25) 24 0 Netherlands Ajax v.  Denmark, 9 October 2018
MF Tessel Middag 23 December 1991 (age 27) 44 4 England West Ham United v.  Slovakia, 12 June 2018

FW Katja Snoeijs 31 August 1996 (age 22) 0 0 Netherlands PSV 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup SBY
FW Ashleigh Weerden 7 June 1999 (age 20) 0 0 Netherlands Twente 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup SBY

Notes:

  • PRE: Preliminary squad
  • SBY: Stand-by list

Management

Name Position
Technical
Sarina Wiegman Head Coach
Michel Kreek Assistant Coach
Arjan Veurink Assistant Coach
Erskine Schoenmakers GK-Trainer
Medical
Niels de Vries Exercise Physiologist
Kim Blewanus Physiotherapist
Karin Thijs Physician
Lonneke Robben-van der Wegen Psychologist
Additional
Sonja van Geerenstein Team Manager
Judith Bloem Video Analyst
Marleen Wissink Head Scout

Coaches

Period Coach Notes Reference(s)
1972–1973 Siem Plooyer [25]
1973–1974 Bert Wouterse [25]
1974–1975 Ger Blok [25]
1975–1977 Ron Groenewoud [25]
1977–1978 Ruud de Groot [25]
1979–1987 Bert van Lingen [25]
1987 Nick Labohm coached in one match (3–1 defeat to West Germany on 1 April 1987) [25]
1987 Dick Advocaat coached in one match (0–0 against Norway on 23 May 1987) [25]
1987–1989 Piet Buter [25]
1989–1992 Bert van Lingen second spell as coach (first spell from 1979 to 1987) [25][26]
1992–1995 Jan Derks [25][26]
1995–2001 Ruud Dokter [25][26]
2001 Andries Jonker interim coach [25][26]
2001–2004 Frans de Kat [25][26]
2004 Remy Reynierse interim coach [25][26]
2004–2010 Vera Pauw [25][26][27][28]
2010 Ed Engelkes interim coach [25][26]
2010–2015 Roger Reijners [25][26][29][28]
2015 Sarina Wiegman interim coach [30]
2015–2016 Arjan van der Laan [30]
2016–2017 Sarina Wiegman second spell as interim coach (first spell in 2015) [4]
2017– permanent coach

Team's records

Current players are highlighted in orange.

Most capped games

Name Period Matches Goals
1 Sherida Spitse 2006 – present 168 30
2 Annemieke Kiesel-Griffioen 1995–2011 156 19
3 Dyanne Bito 2000–2015 146 6
4 Marleen Wissink Righthand.svgLefthand.svg 1989–2006 141 0
5 Daphne Koster 1997–2017 139 7
6 Manon Melis 2005–2016 136 59
7 Loes Geurts Righthand.svgLefthand.svg 2005 – present 123 0
8 Lieke Martens 2011 – present 109 44
9 Sylvia Smit 2004–2013 106 30
10 Sarina Wiegman 1987–2001 104 3

As of 3 July 2019

Top scorers

Name Period Goals Caps Goals/Caps
1 Vivianne Miedema 2013 – present 61 81 0,75
2 Manon Melis 2005 – 2016 59 136 0,43
3 Lieke Martens 2011 – present 44 109 0,40
4 Sylvia Smit 2004 – 2013 30 106 0,28
Sherida Spitse 2006 – present 30 168 0,18
6 Marjoke de Bakker 1979 – 1991 29 60 0,48
7 Annemieke Kiesel-Griffioen 1995 – 2011 19 156 0,12
8 Kirsten van de Ven 2005 – 2016 18 86 0,21
9 Shanice van de Sanden 2008 - present 17 70 0,24
10 Karin Stevens 2006 – 2009 16 35 0,46
Miranda Noom 1994 – 2002 77 0,21
Daniëlle van de Donk 2010 - present 16 95 0,17

As of 3 July 2019

Coaches

Name Period Matches
1 Netherlands Vera Pauw 2004–2010 73
2 Netherlands Roger Reijners 2010–2015 71
3 Netherlands Ruud Dokter 1995–2000 64
4 Netherlands Sarina Wiegman 2017 – present 47
5 Netherlands Bert van Lingen 1979 – 1986, 1989 – 1991 46
6 Netherlands Frans de Kat 2001–2004 27
7 Netherlands Jan Derks 1991–1994 19
8 Netherlands Arjan van der Laan 2015–2016 16
9 Netherlands Piet Buter 1987–1989 15
10 Netherlands Ruud de Groot 1977–1978 8
Netherlands Andries Jonker 2001

As of 3 July 2019

Overall official record

  • All results list the Netherlands goal tally first.
  • Goal scorers are sorted alphabetically.
  • Colors gold, silver, and bronze indicate first-, second-, and third-place finishes.
Abbreviation Key table
EC European Championship (Women's Euro)
WC World Cup
OG Olympic Games
QS Qualification tournament
Competition Stage Result Opponent Position Scorers
1984 EC QS Group Stage: Gr.4 2–3, 5–0 Belgium Belgium 2 / 4 Camper, Fortuin, De Haan, De Jong-Desaunois, Timisela, Timmer, De Visser
2–1, 0–2 Denmark Denmark De Bakker, Camper
2–2, 1–1 Germany West Germany Camper, De Visser (2)
1987 EC QS Group Stage: Gr.3 1–0, 5–3 France France 2 / 4 Allott (4), De Bakker, Camper
0–2, 2–0 Sweden Sweden De Bakker, Vestjens
3–1, 3–0 Belgium Belgium Allott (2), De Bakker, Boogerd, Timisela (2)
1989 EC QS Group Stage: Gr.2 0–0, 1–0 Sweden Sweden 1 / 4 De Bakker
4–0, w/o Scotland Scotland De Bakker (2), Timisela, Wiegman
1–0, 2–0 Republic of Ireland Ireland De Bakker, Timisela, De Winter
Quarter-finals 1–2, 0–3 Norway Norway De Bakker
1991 EC QS Group Stage: Gr.1 2–0, 0–0 Republic of Ireland Ireland 1 / 3 Vestjens (2)
6–0, 9–0 Northern Ireland Northern Ireland Baal, De Bakker (6), Geeris, Limbeek (2), Pauw, Timisela (2), Vestjens, Van Waarden
Quarter-finals 0–0, 0–1 (a.e.t.) Denmark Denmark
1993 EC QS Group Stage: Gr.5 3–0, 2–0 Greece Greece 1 / 3 Geeris (3), Limbeek, Timisela
1–1, 0–0 Romania Romania Van der Ploeg
Quarter-finals 0–3, 0–3 Norway Norway
1995 EC QS Group Stage: Gr.8 1–2, 0–1 Iceland Iceland 2 / 3 Leemans
2–0, 4–0 Greece Greece Van Dam (2), Keereweer, Limbeek, Noom, Roos
1997 EC QS Group Stage: Gr.2
(Class A)
0–2, 0–2 Iceland Iceland 4 / 4
1–1, 1–0 Russia Russia Korbmacher, Van Waarden
1–1, 1–2 France France Korbmacher, Migchelsen
Relegation Play-off 2–1, 1–0 Czech Republic Czech Republic Kiesel-Griffioen, Timisela, Wiegman
1999 WC QS Group Stage: Gr.3
(Class A)
1–6, 0–0 Norway Norway 3 / 4 Roos
0–1, 2–1 England England Noom (2)
1–0, 1–2 Germany Germany Migchelsen, Noom
2001 EC QS Group Stage: Gr.1
(Class A)
1–1, 1–2 France France 4 / 4 Van Eyk, Smith
1–1, 1–2 Spain Spain Kiesel-Griffioen, Smith
1–1, 0–3 Sweden Sweden Smith
Relegation Play-Off 3–0, 2–0 Hungary Hungary Kiesel-Griffioen, Muller, Noom, Torny (2)
2003 WC QS Group Stage: Gr.4
(Class A)
0–0, 1–4 England England 3 / 4 Kiesel-Griffioen
0–3, 0–6 Germany Germany
1–2, 4–1 Portugal Portugal Burger, Muller, Noom, Ran, Smith
2005 EC QS Group Stage: Gr.2
(Class A)
0–1 0–0 Spain Spain 4 / 5
0–2, 0–2 Norway Norway
0–3, 1–5 Denmark Denmark Ran
3–0, 3–0 Belgium Belgium De Boer, Koster, Melis, Muller, Torny, Van Veen
2007 WC QS Group Stage: Gr.5
(Class A)
1–0, 0–2 France France 3 / 5 De Boer
1–0, 4–0 Austria Austria Delies, Demarteau, Louwaars, Smit (2)
0–1, 0–4 England England
5–0, 4–0 Hungary Hungary Delies, Hoogendijk, Louwaars (2), Smit, Smith, Stevens (3)
2009 EC QS Group Stage: Gr.4 1–5, 0–1 Germany Germany 2 / 5 Torny
2–2, 1–1 Switzerland Switzerland Van Eijk, Melis (2)
2–1, 1–0 Wales Wales Melis (2), Smit
2–2, 3–0 Belgium Belgium Hoogendijk, Melis (3), Stevens
Play-Off 2–0, 2–0 Spain Spain Stevens (3), Van de Ven
Finland 2009 EC Group Stage: Gr.A
2–0
Ukraine Ukraine 2 / 4 Stevens, Van de Ven
1–2
Finland Finland Van de Ven
2–1
Denmark Denmark Melis, Smit
Quarter-finals 0–0 (a.e.t.) (5–4 p) France France
Semi-finals 1–2 (a.e.t.) England England Pieëte
2011 WC QS Group Stage: Gr.1 0–3, 2–2 Norway Norway 2 / 5 Dekker, Melis
13–1, 7–0 Republic of Macedonia Macedonia Hoogendijk, Kiesel-Griffioen (4), Koster, Melis (2), Meulen, Pieëte, De Ridder, Slegers, Smit (7), Spitse
1–1, 4–0 Belarus Belarus Melis (2), De Ridder, Slegers, Van de Ven
2–0, 1–0 Slovakia Slovakia Kiesel-Griffioen, Koster, Smit
2013 EC QS Group Stage: Gr.6 6–0, 4–0 Serbia Serbia 2 / 5 Van den Berg, Van de Donk, Hoogendijk, Martens, Melis (6)
3–0, 2–0 Croatia Croatia Melis, De Ridder, Smit, Spitse, Van de Ven
0–0, 0–1 England England
2–0, 3–1 Slovenia Slovenia Heuver, Melis, De Ridder, Van de Ven (2)
Sweden 2013 EC Group Stage: Gr.B
0–0
Germany Germany 4 / 4
0–1
Norway Norway
0–1
Iceland Iceland
2015 WC QS Group Stage: Gr.5 4–0, 10–1 Albania Albania 2 / 6 Bakker, Van den Heiligenberg, Martens (2), Melis (3), Slegers (6), + 1 o.g.
7–0, 3–2 Portugal Portugal Van den Berg, Dekker, Miedema (6), Slegers (2)
1–2, 2–0 Norway Norway Dekker, Van de Donk, Miedema
7–0, 6–0 Greece Greece Bakker, Van den Berg (2), Martens (2), Melis (2), Middag, Miedema (4), Spitse
1–1, 2–0 Belgium Belgium Miedema (2), Slegers
Play-Off Semifinal 2–1, 2–0 Scotland Scotland Martens (2), Melis (2)
Play-Off Final 1–1, 2–1 Italy Italy Miedema (3)
Canada 2015 WC Group Stage: Gr.A
1–0
New Zealand New Zealand 3 / 4 Martens
0–1
China China
1–1
Canada Canada Van de Ven
Round of 16
1–2
Japan Japan Van de Ven
2016 OG QS Single Round-robin
4–3
  Switzerland 2 / 4 Van den Berg, Melis, Miedema, Van de Sanden
1–4
 Norway Melis
1–1
 Sweden Miedema
Netherlands 2017 EC Group Stage: Gr.A
1–0
Norway Norway 1 / 4 Van de Sanden
1–0
Denmark Denmark Spitse
2–1
Belgium Belgium Martens, Spitse
Quarter-finals
2–0
Sweden Sweden Martens, Miedema
Semi-finals
3–0
England England Van de Donk, Miedema, + 1 o.g.
Final
4–2
Denmark Denmark Martens, Miedema (2), Spitse
2019 WC QS Group Stage: Gr.3 1–0 (h), 1–2 (a) Norway Norway 2 / 5 Miedema (2)
5–0 (a), 1–0 (h) Slovakia Slovakia Van der Gragt (2), Martens, Miedema (2), Spitse
0–0 (h), 2–0 (a) Republic of Ireland Ireland Beerensteyn, Spitse
7–0 (h), 5–0 (a) Northern Ireland Northern Ireland Beerensteyn, Van de Donk, Groenen, Martens (2), Miedema, Van de Sanden (2), Spitse (3), + 1 o.g.
Play-Off Semifinal 2–0 (h), 2–1 (a) Denmark Denmark Beerensteyn (3), Van de Sanden
Play-Off Final 3–0 (h), 1–1 (a) Switzerland Switzerland Miedema (2), Martens, Spitse
France 2019 WC Group Stage: Gr.E
1–0
New Zealand New Zealand 1 / 4 Roord
3–1
Cameroon Cameroon Miedema (2), Bloodworth
2–1
Canada Canada Dekker, Beerensteyn
Round of 16
2–1
Japan Japan Martens (2)
Quarter-finals
2–0
Italy Italy women's national football team Miedema, Van der Gragt
Semi-finals
1–0 (a.e.t.)
Sweden Sweden Groenen
Final
0–2
United States United States

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Women's football in the Netherlands Archived 14 July 2014 at the Wayback Machine, Royal Dutch Football Association. Retrieved on 1 July 2014.
  2. ^ a b c "The FIFA/Coca-Cola Women's World Ranking". FIFA. 12 July 2019. Retrieved 12 July 2019.
  3. ^ a b "The women's football World Cup is about to start. Here's the lowdown on the Oranje Lionesses – DutchNews.nl". Retrieved 3 September 2015.
  4. ^ a b "Wiegman succeeds Van der Laan as Netherlands coach". UEFA. 13 January 2017. Retrieved 24 January 2017.
  5. ^ a b "NEDERLANDS VROUWENELFTAL. htstorie" (in Dutch). www.onsoranje.nl. Retrieved 8 April 2018.
  6. ^ Lewis, Aimee (6 July 2019). "USA vs. Netherlands: Dutch World Cup success was decades in the making". CNN. Retrieved 6 July 2019.
  7. ^ Baxter, Kevin (4 July 2019). "Netherlands looks to add Women's World Cup title to European championship". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 6 July 2019.
  8. ^ uefa.com. "UEFA Women's EURO 2009 - History - – UEFA.com". UEFA.com. Retrieved 3 September 2015.
  9. ^ "UEFA Women's Euro history. Netherlands". www.uefa.com. Retrieved 8 April 2018.
  10. ^ "FIFA Women's World Cup Canada 2015. Teams. Netherlands". www.uefa.com. Retrieved 8 April 2018.
  11. ^ "NETHERLANDS VS. DENMARK 4 – 2". uk.soccerway.com. Retrieved 8 April 2018.
  12. ^ "Dutch women's football aiming high". www.uefa.com. Retrieved 8 April 2018.
  13. ^ "Women's World Cup play-off draw on Friday". Retrieved 6 September 2018.
  14. ^ "Netherlands win World Cup play-offs". 13 November 2018. Retrieved 13 November 2018.
  15. ^ a b c "Finale Algarve Cup tussen Oranjevrouwen en Zweden afgelast" (in Dutch). nu.nl. 7 March 2018. Retrieved 7 March 2018.
  16. ^ "Italy–Netherlands playoff match". UEFA. 27 November 2014. Retrieved 27 November 2014.
  17. ^ "FIFA Women's World Cup France 2019™ - Matches - USA - Netherlands". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 7 July 2019. Retrieved 8 July 2019.
  18. ^ UEFA Women's EURO 2009, UEFA. Retrieved on 1 July 2014.
  19. ^ Group B, UEFA. Retrieved on 1 July 2014.
  20. ^ "Lieke Martens named player of the tournament". www.uefa.com. Retrieved 8 April 2018.
  21. ^ a b @Algarve_Cup (7 March 2018). "UPDATE: The match between the Netherlands and Sweden has been cancelled due to heavy rain. As a result, both teams will be awarded 1st place" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  22. ^ "OnsOranje – Uitslagen". www.onsoranje.nl.
  23. ^ "Wiegman maakt 23-koppige WK-selectie bekend".
  24. ^ "Operatie voor Kika van Es".
  25. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r "Bondscoaches Aller Tijden Oranje vrouwen (1972–2011)". vrouwenvoetbalnederland.nl (in Dutch). 19 October 2011. Archived from the original on 10 October 2016.
  26. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Media Guide Netherlands national Women's Team World Cup 2015" (PDF). KNVB. p. 15 (section 'Coaches since 1990'). Retrieved 23 December 2017.
  27. ^ ‹See Tfd›(in Dutch) "De loopbaan van Vera Pauw", Intermediair, 2009. Retrieved on 3 July 2014.
  28. ^ a b ‹See Tfd›(in Dutch) Hugo Logtenberg, "Roger Reijners nieuwe bondscoach vrouwenelftal", de Volkskrant, 2010. Retrieved on 3 July 2014.
  29. ^ ‹See Tfd›(in Dutch) Spelers en Staf: Vrouwen A-elftal Archived 5 July 2014 at the Wayback Machine, Ons Oranje. Retrieved on 2 July 2014.
  30. ^ a b "Van der Laan replaces Reijners as Dutch coach". UEFA. Retrieved 24 October 2015.

External links

Andries Jonker

Andries Jonker (Dutch pronunciation: [ˈɑndris ˈjɔŋkər], 22 September 1962) is a Dutch former footballer and manager.Jonker was at the helm of Holland outfits Willem II, MVV and Volendam and was also the assistant manager of VfL Wolfsburg, FC Barcelona and Bayern Munich as well. He also took up the role as head of the Arsenal F.C. Academy. Jonker as well was at the helm of Wolfsburg.

Angela Christ

Angela Anna Christ (born 6 March 1989) is a Dutch football goalkeeper, who plays for Eredivisie club PSV and played for the Netherlands women's national football team.

Arjan van der Laan

Arjan van der Laan (born 10 November 1969) is a Dutch former footballer, who played as a midfielder. Currently, he is a manager, most recently of the Netherlands women's national football team.

Bert van Lingen

Lubertus Hendricus "Bert" van Lingen (28 December 1945) is a Dutch professional football coach who enjoyed two spells in charge of the Netherlands women's national football team.

He later became an acolyte of Dick Advocaat, accompanying the self-styled 'Little General' on lucrative assignments at Glasgow Rangers, Zenit Saint Petersburg and Sunderland.

Van Lingen is married to Vera Pauw, a former player in his charge some 18 years his junior.

Euroborg

The Hitachi Capital Mobility Stadion, or Hitachi Stadion for short, is the stadium of football club FC Groningen, with a capacity of 22,329 seats and located to the south-east of Groningen. The stadium site houses a casino, movie theater, school, supermarket, and a fitness centre. A temporary railway station at the Euroborg Stadium opened in late 2007, and a permanent one opened in 2013. The stadium's seats are completely clad in the club's colors of green and white, with 1,000 seats available for supporters of the away team.

Ger Blok

Ger Blok (16 October 1939 – 19 December 2016) was a Dutch football manager.

Liza van der Most

Liza van der Most (born 8 October 1993) is a Dutch footballer who plays as defender for AFC Ajax in the Eredivisie and the Netherlands women's national football team.

Loes Geurts

Loes Geurts (Dutch pronunciation: [ˈlus ˈxøːrts]; born 12 January 1986) is a Dutch footballer who plays as a goalkeeper for Kopparbergs/Göteborg FC in the Damallsvenskan. Since making her international debut in 2005, Geurts has collected over 100 caps for the Netherlands women's national football team. She kept goal for the Netherlands at the 2009 and 2013 editions of the UEFA Women's Championship.

Netherlands at the FIFA Women's World Cup

Netherlands have participated two times at the FIFA Women's World Cup: in 2015, in 2019. The have reached the 2nd round in 2015 and the final in 2019.

* Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

Netherlands women's national under-17 football team

Netherlands women's national under-17 football team represents Netherlands in international youth football competitions.

Netherlands women's national under-19 football team

The Netherlands women's national under-19 football team represents the Netherlands at the UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship and is controlled by the Royal Dutch Football Association.

Piet Buter

Piet Buter (Dutch pronunciation: [pit ˈbytər]; born 1950) is a soccer coach from Haarlem, Netherlands. After a number of coaching positions and a spell as technical director of FC Utrecht, he was assistant coach to the Iran national football team.

Remy Reynierse

Remy Reynierse (also written as Remy Reijnierse; born 18 June 1961), is a current coach at Sheffield Wednesday.

He is a former Dutch football manager and former player. As a player, he served EVV Eindhoven (now known as FC Eindhoven) and FC VVV (now known as VVV-Venlo). As a manager, he has coached VVV, the Netherlands women's national football team and several other representative teams of the Royal Dutch Football Association.

Roger Reijners

Roger Reijners (born 10 February 1964) is a Dutch football coach and former player.

Ron Groenewoud

Ron Groenewoud (born 24 January 1937) is a former Dutch footballer and football manager.

Sarina Wiegman

Sarina Wiegman (born 26 October 1969), also known as Sarina Wiegman-Glotzbach, is a Dutch former footballer and current head coach of the Netherlands women's national football team. She played as a central midfielder and, later in her career, as a defender. In 2001, she became the first Dutch footballer to gain 100 caps.After retiring from play in 2003, Wiegman started a managerial career, coaching the women's teams of Ter Leede and ADO Den Haag. In 2014, she became assistant manager of the national team. In 2016, Wiegman received her full coaching licence and became the first woman to work as coach at a Dutch professional football organisation.After being appointed head coach of the Netherlands Women, Wiegman led them to victory at the UEFA Women's Euro 2017. Two years later, she guided the team to a runners-up medal at the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup.

UEFA Women's Euro 2017 Final

The UEFA Women's Euro 2017 Final was a football match to determine the winner of UEFA Women's Euro 2017. The match took place on 6 August 2017 at De Grolsch Veste in Enschede, Netherlands, and was contested by the winners of the semi-finals, the Netherlands and Denmark.

The Netherlands won the final 4–2 for their first UEFA Women's Championship title.

Vera Pauw

Vera Pauw (Dutch pronunciation: [ˈveːraː pʌu]; born 18 January 1963) is a Dutch football coach and former player. She has managed several national women's football teams, including Scotland, Netherlands, Russia and South Africa.

Vivianne Miedema

Anna Margaretha Marina Astrid Miedema (Dutch pronunciation: [ˈɑnaː mɑrɣaːˈreːtaː maːˈrinaː ˈʔɑstrɪt ˈmidəmaː]; born 15 July 1996), commonly known as Vivianne Miedema ([viviˈjɑnə]), is a Dutch professional footballer who plays as a forward for FA WSL club Arsenal and the Netherlands women's national football team. She has scored more goals at international level for the Netherlands than any other player, across both the women’s and men’s teams.

FIFA Women's World Cup history
Year Round Date Opponent Result Stadium
Canada 2015 Group stage 6 June  New Zealand W 1–0 Commonwealth Stadium, Edmonton
11 June  China PR L 0–1
15 June  Canada D 1–1 Olympic Stadium, Montreal
Round of 16 23 June  Japan L 1–2 BC Place, Vancouver
France 2019 Group stage 11 June  New Zealand W 1–0 Stade Océane, Le Havre
15 June  Cameroon W 3–1 Stade du Hainaut, Valenciennes
20 June  Canada W 2–1 Stade Auguste-Delaune, Reims
Round of 16 25 June  Japan W 2–1 Roazhon Park, Rennes
Quarter-finals 29 June  Italy W 2–0 Stade du Hainaut, Valenciennes
Semi-finals 3 July  Sweden W 1–0 (aet) Parc Olympique Lyonnais, Décines-Charpieu
Final 7 July  United States L 0–2 Parc Olympique Lyonnais, Décines-Charpieu
20 January 2018 FriendlySpain 2–0 NetherlandsMurcia, Spain
18:00
Report Stadium: Pinatar Arena Football Center
Attendance: 1,328
Referee: Marta Frias Acedo (Spain)
28 February 2018 Algarve Cup – GSJapan 2–6 NetherlandsBela Vista Municipal Stadium, Parchal
15:40
Report
Referee: Anastasia Pustovoitova (Russia)
2 March 2018 Algarve Cup – GSDenmark 2–3 NetherlandsVRS António Sports Complex, Vila Real de Santo António
18:30
Report Referee: Casey Reibelt (Australia)
5 March 2018 Algarve Cup – GSIceland 0–0 NetherlandsAlbufeira Municipal Stadium, Albufeira
15:40 Report Referee: Jeong Oh-hyeon (South Korea)
7 March 2018 Algarve Cup – FinalNetherlands Cancelled[15][21] SwedenBela Vista Municipal Stadium, Parchal
18:30 Report
6 April 2018 2019 FIFA World Cup qualifierNetherlands 7–0 Northern IrelandPhilips Stadion, Eindhoven
20:00
Report Attendance: 30,238
Referee: Monika Mularczyk (Poland)
10 April 2018 2019 FIFA World Cup qualifierRepublic of Ireland 0–2 NetherlandsTallaght Stadium, Dublin
20:00 Report
Attendance: 4,047
Referee: Stéphanie Frappart (France)
8 June 2018 2019 FIFA World Cup qualifierNorthern Ireland 0–5 NetherlandsShamrock Park, Portadown
20:00 Report
Attendance: 954
Referee: Tess Olofsson (Sweden)
12 June 2018 2019 FIFA World Cup qualifierNetherlands 1–0 SlovakiaAbe Lenstra Stadion, Heerenveen
20:00 Martens Goal 90+2' Report Attendance: 23,221
Referee: María Dolores Martinez Madrona (Spain)
4 September 2018 2019 FIFA World Cup qualifierNorway 2–1 NetherlandsIntility Arena, Oslo
17:00
Report
Attendance: 5,134
Referee: Riem Hussein (Germany)
5 October 2018 2019 FIFA World Cup qualifier – Play-off SFNetherlands 2–0 DenmarkRat Verlegh Stadion, Breda
20:00 Report Attendance: 19000
Referee: Kateryna Monzul (Ukraine)
9 October 2018 2019 FIFA World Cup qualifier – Play-off SFDenmark 1–2 NetherlandsViborg Stadium, Viborg
18:00 Nadim Goal 5' (P) Report
Attendance: 5374
Referee: Sara Persson (Sweden)
9 November 2018 2019 FIFA World Cup qualifier – Play-off FinalNetherlands 3–0  SwitzerlandStadion Galgenwaard, Utrecht
20:00
Report Attendance: 23750
Referee: Pernilla Larsson (Sweden)
13 November 2018 2019 FIFA World Cup qualifier – Play-off FinalSwitzerland  1–1 NetherlandsLIPO Park, Schaffhausen
19:00
  • Sow Goal 71'
Report
Attendance: 5148
Referee: Stéphanie Frappart (France)
19 January 2019 FriendlySouth Africa 1–2 NetherlandsCape Town Stadium, Cape Town
19:00
Report
Referee: Gladys Lengwe (Zambia)
27 February 2019 2019 Algarve CupSpain 2–0 NetherlandsBela Vista Municipal Stadium, Parchal
19:00 Hermoso Goal 22'64' Report Referee: Marie-Soleil Beaudoin (Canada)
4 March 2019 2019 Algarve CupNetherlands 0–1 PolandBela Vista Municipal Stadium, Parchal
19:00 Report
6 March 2019 2019 Algarve CupChina PR 1–1
(2–4 p)
 NetherlandsAlbufeira Municipal Stadium, Albufeira
19:00 Yao Goal 50' Report Miedema Goal 45'
Penalties
5 April 2019 FriendlyNetherlands 2–0 MexicoGelreDome, Arnhem
19:00
Report
9 April 2019 FriendlyNetherlands 7–0 ChileAFAS Stadion, Alkmaar
19:00
Report
1 June 2019 FriendlyNetherlands 3–0 AustraliaEindhoven, Netherlands
18:15 CEST
Report Stadium: Philips Stadion
Referee: Cheryl Foster (Wales)
11 June 2019 2019 FIFA Women's World CupGSNew Zealand 0–1 NetherlandsLe Havre, France
15:00 CEST Report Roord Goal 90+2' Stadium: Stade Océane
Attendance: 10,654
Referee: Edina Alves Batista (Brazil)
15 June 2019 2019 FIFA Women's World CupGSNetherlands 3–1 CameroonValenciennes, France
15:00 CEST Miedema Goal 41'85'
Bloodworth Goal 48'
Report Onguéné Goal 43' Stadium: Stade du Hainaut
Attendance: 22,423
Referee: Casey Reibelt (Australia)
20 June 2019 2019 FIFA Women's World CupGSNetherlands 2–1 CanadaReims, France
15:00 CEST Dekker Goal 54'
Beerensteyn Goal 75'
Report Sinclair Goal 60' Stadium: Stade Auguste-Delaune
Attendance: 19,277
Referee: Stéphanie Frappart (France)
25 June 2019 2019 FIFA Women's World CupR16Netherlands 2–1 JapanRennes, France
21:00 CEST Martens Goal 17'90' (pen.) Report Hasegawa Goal 43' Stadium: Roazhon Park
Attendance: 21,076
Referee: Melissa Borjas (Honduras)
29 June 2019 2019 FIFA Women's World CupQFItaly 0–2 NetherlandsValenciennes, France
15:00 CEST Report Miedema Goal 70'
Van der Gragt Goal 80'
Stadium: Stade du Hainaut
Attendance: 22,600
Referee: Claudia Umpiérrez (Uruguay)
3 July 2019 2019 FIFA Women's World CupSFNetherlands 1–0 (a.e.t.) SwedenDécines-Charpieu, France
21:00 CEST Groenen Goal 99' Report Stadium: Parc Olympique Lyonnais
Attendance: 48,452
Referee: Marie-Soleil Beaudoin (Canada)
7 July 2019 2019 FIFA Women's World CupFinalUnited States 2–0 NetherlandsDécines-Charpieu, France
17:00 CEST Rapinoe Goal 61' (pen.)
Lavelle Goal 69'
Report Stadium: Parc Olympique Lyonnais
Attendance: 57,900
Referee: Stéphanie Frappart (France)
30 August 2019 UEFA Women's Euro 2021 qualifyingEstonia v NetherlandsTallinn, Estonia
Report Stadium: A. Le Coq Arena
3 September 2019 UEFA Women's Euro 2021 qualifyingNetherlands v Turkey
Report
4 October 2019 UEFA Women's Euro 2021 qualifyingSlovenia v Netherlands
Report
8 October 2019 UEFA Women's Euro 2021 qualifyingNetherlands v Russia
Report
8 November 2019 UEFA Women's Euro 2021 qualifyingTurkey v Netherlands
Report
12 November 2019 UEFA Women's Euro 2021 qualifyingNetherlands v Slovenia
Report
Netherlands squads – FIFA Women's World Cup
Netherlands squads – UEFA Women's Championship
Netherlands at the FIFA Women's World Cup
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