Nestor Chylak

Nestor George Chylak Jr. (/ˈtʃaɪlæk/; May 11, 1922 – February 17, 1982) was an American umpire in Major League Baseball who worked in the American League from 1954 to 1978. He umpired in three ALCS (1969, 1972, 1973), serving as crew chief in 1969 and 1973. He also called five World Series (1957, 1960, 1966, 1971, 1977), serving as the crew chief in 1971 (in which he called balls and strikes in the decisive Game 7) and 1977. He also worked in six All-Star Games: 1957, 1960 (both games), 1964, 1973 and 1978, calling balls and strikes in the second 1960 game and in 1973.

Nestor Chylak
Nestor Chylak 1955
Umpire
Born: May 11, 1922
Olyphant, Pennsylvania, U.S.
Died: February 17, 1982 (aged 59)
Dunmore, Pennsylvania, U.S.
debut
1954
Last appearance
1978
Career highlights and awards
Special Assignments
Member of the National
Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Baseball Hall of Fame Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg
Induction1999
Election MethodVeterans Committee
Military career
Place of burial
SS. Cyril and Methodius Catholic Cemetery
Peckville, Pennsylvania, U.S.
Allegiance United States
Service/branch United States Army
Years of service1942–1945
Battles/warsWorld War II
* Battle of the Bulge (1944 – 45)
AwardsSilver Star (1)
Purple Heart (1)

Early life

Chylak was born in Olyphant, Pennsylvania. His parents, Nestor Sr. and Nellie, were of Ukrainian descent; Chylak was the first of their five children.[1] He attended the University of Scranton, where he studied engineering.[2]

During World War II, he served in the U.S. Army in Europe. He suffered shrapnel injuries in Battle of the Bulge, which blinded him for several days and hospitalized him for eight weeks.[3] He earned both the Silver Star and Purple Heart during his service. After the war, he began umpiring amateur baseball in 1946, and returned briefly to college.[1]

Career

After a year in amateur baseball, Chylak moved into the minor leagues as a Pennsylvania-Ontario-New York League umpire. He spent several more minor league seasons in the Canadian–American League, the New England League, and the Eastern League. He debuted in the major leagues in 1954.[1]

Chylak said that two of his greatest thrills occurred in the early to mid-1960s. In the 1960 World Series, he was umpiring when Bill Mazeroski of the Pittsburgh Pirates hit the home run that allowed the Pirates to defeat the New York Yankees. He worked Sandy Koufax's final game in the 1966 World Series in which Koufax and the Dodgers faced the Baltimore Orioles and Jim Palmer.[4]

Chylak worked the first American League Championship Series in 1969. On June 4, 1974, he was on the field in Cleveland for "Ten Cent Beer Night".[5] The Cleveland Indians had been struggling with low attendance figures, resulting in this promotion that attracted more than 25,000 fans to the game. Fans became unruly and incited fights with the players, sometimes pouring beer on them. Chylak declared the game a forfeit after he sustained a facial wound from being hit with a chair.[1]

Blue Jays White Sox 1977
Chylak at home plate during the inaugural game of the Toronto Blue Jays franchise. At bat is Ralph Garr of the Chicago White Sox, and catching for the Blue Jays is Rick Cerone.

He was the home plate umpire for the first major league game played by the Toronto Blue Jays in 1977 during a snowstorm at Exhibition Stadium.

After retiring from the field in 1978, he became an assistant league supervisor of umpires. Chylak was in the umpire's dressing room at Comiskey Park on Disco Demolition Night, a July 12, 1979, doubleheader between the Detroit Tigers and Chicago White Sox. Between the games of the doubleheader, unruly fans rioted. Because of damage to the field, the umpires refused to allow the second game to be played. When American League president Lee MacPhail decided the White Sox must forfeit the second game, Chylak was the one who informed White Sox owner Bill Veeck.[6]

Post-retirement

Following his retirement, he became a member of the Sports Illustrated Speakers' Bureau and addressed a wide variety of groups, "talking about the intangible lessons he learned during his years in baseball".[7] Chylak died of a heart attack at age 59 in Dunmore, Pennsylvania, and is survived by his wife Sue, his sons Robert and William, and seven grandchildren.

Legacy

Upon his death, Bowie Kuhn said that "few have ever been more respected in his field than Mr. Chylak."[4] AL president Lee MacPhail said, "He was considered an outstanding teacher and certainly one of the finest umpires in major league baseball in modern times. We are sure he will be a candidate for eventual Hall of Fame recognition... Baseball has lost a wonderful friend and a great umpire."[4] He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame by the Veterans Committee in 1999.[8]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d McIntyre, Danielle. "Chylak, Nestor George (Jr.)". Pennsylvania Center for the Book. Retrieved November 27, 2014.
  2. ^ Kashatus (2002), p. 40.
  3. ^ Crowe, Jerry (2010-11-10). "For these athletes, being a veteran was much more than just having experience". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2017-01-21.
  4. ^ a b c "Chylak, former ump, dies". Ellensburg Daily Record. Ellensburg, Wash. February 18, 1982. Retrieved November 27, 2014 – via Google News Archive.
  5. ^ Castrovince, Anthony (2014-06-04). "Forty years ago, 10-cent beer makes memories". MLB.com. Major League Baseball. Retrieved 2017-01-21.
  6. ^ "Nestor Chylak". National Baseball Hall of Fame. National Baseball Hall of Fame. Retrieved 23 April 2017.
  7. ^ Kashatus (2002), p. 126.
  8. ^ Kashatus (2002), p. 88.

References

  • Kashatus, William C. (2002). Diamonds in the Coalfields: 21 Remarkable Baseball Players, Managers, and Umpires from Northeast Pennsylvania. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company. ISBN 978-0-7864-1176-4.

External links

1922 in the United States

Events from the year 1922 in the United States.

1957 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1957 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 24th playing of the midseason exhibition baseball game between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 9, 1957, at Busch Stadium in St. Louis, Missouri, the home of the St. Louis Cardinals of the National League. The game was marked by controversy surrounding Cincinnati Redlegs fans stuffing the ballot box and electing all but one of their starting position players to the game. The game resulted in the American League defeating the National League 6–5.

1957 World Series

The 1957 World Series featured the defending champions, the New York Yankees (American League), playing against the Milwaukee Braves (National League). After finishing just one game behind the N.L. Champion Brooklyn Dodgers in 1956, the Braves came back in 1957 to win their first pennant since moving from Boston in 1953. The Braves won the Series in seven games, behind Lew Burdette's three complete game victories. The Braves would be the only team besides the Yankees, Dodgers, or Giants to win a World Series title in the 1950s.

The Yankees had home field advantage in the series. Games 1, 2, 6, and 7 were played at Yankee Stadium, while Milwaukee County Stadium hosted Games 3, 4, and 5. This was the first time since 1946 that the Series included scheduled off days after Games 2 and 5.

Of the previous ten World Series, the Yankees had participated in eight of them and won seven. This was also the first World Series since 1948 that a team from New York did not win.

This is the first of four Yankees-Braves matchups, and the only Series that was won by the Braves; they lost in 1958, 1996 and 1999, with the last two instances occurring with the Braves based in Atlanta.

Hank Aaron led all regulars with a .393 average and eleven hits, including a triple, three home runs and seven RBI.

As of April 2015, four original television broadcasts from this Series (Games 1, 3, 5 and 6) had been released on DVD.

1960 Major League Baseball All-Star Game (first game)

The 1960 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 28th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 11, 1960, at Municipal Stadium in Kansas City, Missouri the home of the Kansas City Athletics of the American League. The game resulted in the National League defeating the American League 5–3.

A second all-star game was played two days later on July 13 at Yankee Stadium in New York City.

1960 Major League Baseball All-Star Game (second game)

The second 1960 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 29th playing of Major League Baseball's annual midsummer exhibition game. The game took place at Yankee Stadium in New York City, home of the American League's New York Yankees. The National League won the game by a score of 6–0. The National League hit four home runs, tying an All-Star Game record.

1960 World Series

The 1960 World Series was played between the Pittsburgh Pirates of the National League (NL) and the New York Yankees of the American League (AL) from October 5 to 13, 1960. It is most notable for the Game 7, ninth-inning home run hit by Bill Mazeroski, the only time a winner-take-all World Series game has ended with a walk-off home run.

Despite losing the series, the Yankees scored 55 runs, the most runs scored by any one team in World Series history, a unique record, and more than twice as many as the Pirates, who scored 27 runs. The Yankees won three blowout games (16–3, 10–0, and 12–0), while the Pirates won four close games (6–4, 3–2, 5–2, and 10–9) to win the series. The Series MVP was Bobby Richardson of the Yankees, the only time in history that the award has been given to a member of the losing team.

This World Series featured seven past, present, or future league Most Valuable Players. The Pirates had two – Dick Groat (1960) and Roberto Clemente (1966) – while the Yankees had five: Yogi Berra (1951, 1954, 1955), Bobby Shantz (1952), Mickey Mantle (1956, 1957, 1962), Roger Maris (1960, 1961), and Elston Howard (1963).

As noted in the superstition called the "Ex-Cub Factor", this was the only Series after 1945 and until 2001 in which a team with three or more former members of the Chicago Cubs (Don Hoak, Smoky Burgess, and Gene Baker) was able to win a World Series.

The World Championship for the Pirates was their third overall and first since 1925.

1964 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1964 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 35th midseason exhibition between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and the National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was played on July 7, 1964, at Shea Stadium in New York City, New York, home of the New York Mets of the National League. The game was a 7–4 victory for the NL. Johnny Callison hit a walk-off home run, the most recent MLB All-Star game to end in such a fashion.

1966 World Series

The 1966 World Series matched the American League (AL) champion Baltimore Orioles against the defending World Series champion and National League (NL) champion Los Angeles Dodgers, with the Orioles sweeping the Series in four games to capture their first championship in franchise history. It was also the last World Series played before Major League Baseball (MLB) introduced the Commissioner's Trophy the following year. The Dodgers suffered record low scoring, accumulating just two runs over the course of the series, the lowest number of runs ever scored by any one team in the history of the World Series.

This World Series marked the end of the Dodgers dynasty of frequent postseason appearances stretching back to 1947. Conversely, it marked the beginning of the Orioles dynasty of frequent postseason appearances that continued until 1983.

1969 American League Championship Series

The 1969 American League Championship Series was the first ALCS held after Major League Baseball adopted the two-division format that season. It featured the Baltimore Orioles vs. the Minnesota Twins, with the Orioles winning the series 3–0 and advancing to the 1969 World Series, where they would lose to the New York Mets in five games. The Orioles and Twins would meet again the following year, with similar results.

This was the first of three straight appearances in the ALCS for the Orioles.

1971 World Series

The 1971 World Series was the 68th edition of Major League Baseball's championship series, and the conclusion of the 1971 season. A best-of-seven playoff, it matched the defending World Series and American League (AL) champion Baltimore Orioles against the National League (NL) champion Pittsburgh Pirates, with the Pirates winning in seven games. Game 4, played in Pittsburgh on Wednesday, was the first-ever World Series game played at night.

The teams proved to be evenly matched, as the Series went the full seven games; the home team prevailed in each of the first six. In Game Seven in Baltimore, the Pirates' Steve Blass pitched a four-hit complete game for a 2–1 win over Mike Cuellar and the Orioles.

In his final World Series appearance, Roberto Clemente became the first Spanish-speaking ballplayer to earn World Series MVP honors. He hit safely in all seven games of the Series, duplicating a feat he had performed in 1960.

Twenty-one-year-old rookie Bruce Kison pitched 6⅓ scoreless innings and allowed just one hit in two appearances for the Pirates; he set a record of three hit batters in a World Series game (#4), which also tied the 1907 record for a World Series.

This was the first of three consecutive World Series, all seven games, in which the winning team scored fewer runs overall. The trend continued for the next seven-game series in 1975.

These two teams met again in the fall classic eight years later, with the same result, as the Pirates won the final three games to win in seven.

1973 American League Championship Series

The 1973 American League Championship Series took place between October 6 and 11, 1973. The Oakland Athletics defeated the Baltimore Orioles, three games to two. Games 1 and 2 were played in Memorial Stadium in Baltimore; Games 3–5 were played at the Oakland Coliseum. It was the second match-up between the two teams in the ALCS.

1973 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1973 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 44th midseason exhibition between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and the National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was played on July 24, 1973, at Royals Stadium in Kansas City, Missouri, home of the Kansas City Royals of the American League. The game resulted in a 7–1 victory for the NL.Royals Stadium had not even been open for four months when it hosted this, its first All-Star Game. The game had been hosted in Kansas City once before (1960) when the Kansas City Athletics had been the host team at Kansas City's Municipal Stadium. After this game was played, the Royals did not host another All-Star Game until they were awarded the 2012 All-Star Game.

Arrowhead Stadium, which shares the same parking lot as part of the Harry S. Truman Sports Complex, hosted the 1974 Pro Bowl about six months after this game.

This game marked the 40th anniversary year of the first All-Star Game in 1933. As a part of that recognition, some of the surviving stars from that first game, including Dick Bartell, Joe Cronin, Jimmie Dykes, Charlie Gehringer, Lefty Gomez, Lefty Grove, Bill Hallahan, and Carl Hubbell were in attendance.

1974 Cleveland Indians season

The 1974 Cleveland Indians season was the team's 74th season in Major League Baseball. It involved the Indians competing in the American League East, where they finished fourth with a record of 77–85.

1978 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1978 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 49th midseason exhibition between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and the National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was played on July 11, 1978, at San Diego Stadium in San Diego, home of the San Diego Padres of the National League. The game resulted in a 7-3 victory for the NL.

This was the first All-Star Game to be played in San Diego. It would return in 1992 to be played in the same stadium, though it was renamed Jack Murphy Stadium by that time.

The honorary captains were Brooks Robinson (for the AL) and Eddie Mathews (for the NL).

1999 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 1999 followed the system in use since 1995. The Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from recent major league players and elected three: George Brett, Nolan Ryan, and Robin Yount. The Veterans Committee met in closed sessions and selected four people from multiple classified ballots: Orlando Cepeda, Nestor Chylak, Frank Selee, and Joe Williams.

Brett, Ryan, and Yount—the BBWAA class of 1999—were all newly eligible, as they all played their last games in 1993. It was the first time the writers elected more than two first-ballot candidates since the inaugural class of 1936 (five).

Induction ceremonies in Cooperstown, New York, were held July 25 with George Grande as emcee.

1999 Major League Baseball season

The 1999 Major League Baseball season ended with the New York Yankees sweeping the Atlanta Braves in the World Series.

The previous record of most home runs hit in a season, set at 5,064 in 1998, was broken once again as the American League and National League combined to hit 5,528 home runs. Moreover, it was the first season in 49 years to feature a team that scored 1,000 runs in a season, as the Cleveland Indians led the Majors with 1,009 runs scored. Only 193 shutouts were recorded in 2,427 regular-season games.

Major League Baseball umpiring records

The following include various records set by umpires in Major League Baseball. Leagues are abbreviated as follows:

AA – American Association, 1882–1891

AL – American League, 1901–1999

FL – Federal League, 1914–1915

ML – Major League Baseball, 2000–present (AL and NL umpiring staffs were merged in 2000)

NL – National League, 1876–1999

PL – Players' League, 1890

Silver Star

The Silver Star Medal, unofficially the Silver Star, is the United States Armed Forces's third-highest personal decoration for valor in combat. The Silver Star Medal is awarded primarily to members of the United States Armed Forces for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United States.

Ten Cent Beer Night

Ten Cent Beer Night was a promotion held by Major League Baseball's Cleveland Indians during a game against the Texas Rangers at Cleveland Stadium on Tuesday, June 4, 1974.

The idea behind the promotion was to attract more fans to the game by offering 12 fluid ounce (355 ml) cups of 3.2% beer for just 10 cents each, a substantial discount on the regular price of 65 cents, with a limit of six beers per purchase but with no limit on the number of purchases made during the game. During the game, fans became heavily intoxicated, culminating in a riot in the ninth inning which caused the game to be forfeited due to the crowd's uncontrollable rowdiness and because the game could not be resumed in a timely manner.

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Ford C. Frick Award
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